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  1. Currents in Contemporary Ethics.Mary R. Anderlik & Mark A. Rothstein - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (3):450-454.
    In financial disputes involving research, the parties are traditionally individual researchers and their institutions, biotech and pharmaceutical companies, and other entities engaged in the commercial development of biomedical research. Occasionally, research subjects claim that researchers have misled them or misappropriated their biological materials to derive financial gain. The best known example is the case of Moore v. Regents of the University of California, decided in 1990.With new developments in genomics, large-scale repositories of tissue and other biological specimens are increasingly important. (...)
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  • Balancing Health Worker Well-Being and Duty to Care: An Ethical Approach to Staff Safety in COVID-19 and Beyond.Rosalind J. McDougall, Lynn Gillam, Danielle Ko, Isabella Holmes & Clare Delany - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (5):318-323.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the risks that can be involved in healthcare work. In this paper, we explore the issue of staff safety in clinical work using the example of personal protective equipment in the COVID-19 crisis. We articulate some of the specific ethical challenges around PPE currently being faced by front-line clinicians, and develop an approach to staff safety that involves balancing duty to care and personal well-being. We describe each of these values, and present a decision-making framework (...)
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  • Intensivpflege in Zeiten der COVID-19 Pandemie: Zur Frage des Verhältnisses von Fürsorge und Selbstsorge.Eva Kuhn & Anna-Henrikje Seidlein - 2021 - Ethik in der Medizin 33 (1):51-70.
    Die COVID-19 Pandemie stellt eine beträchtliche Herausforderung für die Kapazität und Funktionalität der Intensivversorgung dar. Dies betrifft nicht nur Ressourcen, sondern vor allem auch die körperlichen und psychischen Grenzen von Pflegefachpersonen. Der Frage, wie sich Fürsorge und Selbstsorge von Pflegefachpersonen auf Intensivstationen im Rahmen der COVID-19 Pandemie zueinander verhalten, wurde bislang im öffentlichen und wissenschaftlichen Diskurs keine Aufmerksamkeit geschenkt. Der vorliegende Beitrag reflektiert dieses Verhältnis mit Hilfe des Ethikkodex des International Council of Nurses, unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Prinzipienethik und der (...)
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  • Intensivpflege in Zeiten der COVID-19 Pandemie: Zur Frage des Verhältnisses von Fürsorge und SelbstsorgeBetween care for others and self-care: intensive care nursing in times of the COVID-19 pandemic. [REVIEW]Eva Kuhn & Anna-Henrikje Seidlein - 2021 - Ethik in der Medizin 33 (1):51-70.
    ZusammenfassungDie COVID-19 Pandemie stellt eine beträchtliche Herausforderung für die Kapazität und Funktionalität der Intensivversorgung dar. Dies betrifft nicht nur Ressourcen, sondern vor allem auch die körperlichen und psychischen Grenzen von Pflegefachpersonen. Der Frage, wie sich Fürsorge und Selbstsorge von Pflegefachpersonen auf Intensivstationen im Rahmen der COVID-19 Pandemie zueinander verhalten, wurde bislang im öffentlichen und wissenschaftlichen Diskurs keine Aufmerksamkeit geschenkt. Der vorliegende Beitrag reflektiert dieses Verhältnis mit Hilfe des Ethikkodex des International Council of Nurses, unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Prinzipienethik und der (...)
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  • Currents in Contemporary Ethics.Mark A. Rothstein - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):412-419.
    The 2009 pandemic of influenza A was relatively mild, but a subsequent outbreak of pandemic influenza could be much worse. According to projections from the Department of Health and Human Services, the potential health consequences of a severe influenza pandemic in the United States could be literally overwhelming: up to 1.9 million deaths; 90 million people sick; 45 million people needing outpatient care; 9.9 million people hospitalized, of whom 1.485 million would need treatment in an intensive care unit ; and (...)
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  • Doctors During the COVID-19 Pandemic: What Are Their Duties and What is Owed to Them?Stephanie B. Johnson & Frances Butcher - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (1):12-15.
    Doctors form an essential part of an effective response to the COVID-19 pandemic. We argue they have a duty to participate in pandemic response due to their special skills, but these skills vary between different doctors, and their duties are constrained by other competing rights. We conclude that while doctors should be encouraged to meet the demand for medical aid in the pandemic, those who make the sacrifices and increased efforts are owed reciprocal obligations in return. When reciprocal obligations are (...)
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  • Resuscitation During the Pandemic: Optional Obligation? Or Supererogation?Jonathan Perkins, Mark Hamilton, Charlotte Canniff, Craig Gannon, Marianne Illsley, Paul Murray, Kate Scribbins, Martin Stockwell, Justin Wilson & Ann Gallagher - forthcoming - Sage Publications: Clinical Ethics.
    Clinical Ethics, Ahead of Print. This paper is a response to a recent BMJ Blog: ‘The duty to treat: where do the limits lie?’ Members of the Surrey Heartlands Integrated Care Service Clinical Ethics Group reflected on arguments in the Blog in relation to resuscitation during the COVID-19 pandemic.Clinicians have had to contend with ever-changing and conflicting guidance from the Resuscitation Council UK and Public Health England regarding personal protective equipment requirements in resuscitation situations. St John Ambulance had different guidance (...)
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  • Relational Ethical Approaches to the COVID-19 Pandemic.David Ian Jeffrey - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (8):495-498.
    Key ethical challenges for healthcare workers arising from the COVID-19 pandemic are identified: isolation and social distancing, duty of care and fair access to treatment. The paper argues for a relational approach to ethics which includes solidarity, relational autonomy, duty, equity, trust and reciprocity as core values. The needs of the poor and socially disadvantaged are highlighted. Relational autonomy and solidarity are explored in relation to isolation and social distancing. Reciprocity is discussed with reference to healthcare workers’ duty of care (...)
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  • Refusal to Care.Rebecca F. Cady - 2008 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 10 (2):42-45.
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  • Research Ethics and International Epidemic Response: The Case of Ebola and Marburg Hemorrhagic Fevers.Philippe Calain, Nathalie Fiore, Marc Poncin & Samia A. Hurst - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (1):7-29.
    Institute for Biomedical Ethics, Geneva University Medical School * Corresponding author: Médecins Sans Frontières (OCG), rue de Lausanne 78, CH-1211 Geneva 21, Switzerland. Tel.: +41 (0)22 849 89 29; Fax: +41 (0)22 849 84 88; Email: philippe_calain{at}hotmail.com ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract Outbreaks of filovirus (Ebola and Marburg) hemorrhagic fevers in Africa are typically the theater of rescue activities involving international experts and agencies tasked with reinforcing national authorities in clinical management, biological diagnosis, sanitation, (...)
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  • In Defense of (Some) Altered Standards of Care for Ebola Infections in Developed Countries.Philip M. Rosoff - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (1):1-9.
    The current outbreak of Ebola virus infection in West Africa continues to spread. Several patients have now been treated in the United States and preparations are being made for more. Because of the strict isolation required for their care, questions have been raised about what diagnostic and therapeutic interventions should be available. I discuss the ethical challenges associated with caring for patients in strict isolation and personnel wearing bulky protective gear with reduced dexterity and flexibility, the limitations this may place (...)
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  • Non-Professional Healthcare Workers and Ethical Obligations to Work During Pandemic Influenza.H. Draper, T. Sorell, J. Ives, S. Damery, S. Greenfield, J. Parry, J. Petts & S. Wilson - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (1):23-34.
    Most academic papers on ethics in pandemics concentrate on the duties of healthcare professionals. This paper will consider non-professional healthcare workers: do they have a moral obligation to work during an influenza pandemic? If so, is this an obligation that outweighs others they might have, e.g., as parents, and should such an obligation be backed up by the coercive power of law? This paper considers whether non-professional healthcare workers—porters, domestic service workers, catering staff, clerks, IT support workers, etc.—have an obligation (...)
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  • Pandemic Influenza Preparedness: An Ethical Framework to Guide Decision-Making. [REVIEW]Alison Thompson, Karen Faith, Jennifer Gibson & Ross Upshur - 2006 - BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):1-11.
    Background Planning for the next pandemic influenza outbreak is underway in hospitals across the world. The global SARS experience has taught us that ethical frameworks to guide decision-making may help to reduce collateral damage and increase trust and solidarity within and between health care organisations. Good pandemic planning requires reflection on values because science alone cannot tell us how to prepare for a public health crisis. Discussion In this paper, we present an ethical framework for pandemic influenza planning. The ethical (...)
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  • Ethics-Sensitivity of the Ghana National Integrated Strategic Response Plan for Pandemic Influenza.Amos Laar & Debra DeBruin - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):30.
    Many commentators call for a more ethical approach to planning for influenza pandemics. In the developed world, some pandemic preparedness plans have already been examined from an ethical viewpoint. This paper assesses the attention given to ethics issues by the Ghana National Integrated Strategic Plan for Pandemic Influenza.
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  • What Does the Patient Say? Levinas and Medical Ethics.Lawrence Burns - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (2):214-235.
    The patient–physician relationship is of primary importance for medical ethics, but it also teaches broader lessons about ethics generally. This is particularly true for the philosopher Emmanuel Levinas whose ethics is grounded in the other who “faces” the subject and whose suffering provokes responsibility. Given the pragmatic, situational character of Levinasian ethics, the “face of the other” may be elucidated by an analogy with the “face of the patient.” To do so, I draw on examples from Martin Winckler’s fictional physician (...)
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  • Ethics, Pandemics, and the Duty to Treat.Heidi Malm, Thomas May, Leslie P. Francis, Saad B. Omer, Daniel A. Salmon & Robert Hood - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):4 – 19.
    Numerous grounds have been offered for the view that healthcare workers have a duty to treat, including expressed consent, implied consent, special training, reciprocity (also called the social contract view), and professional oaths and codes. Quite often, however, these grounds are simply asserted without being adequately defended or without the defenses being critically evaluated. This essay aims to help remedy that problem by providing a critical examination of the strengths and weaknesses of each of these five grounds for asserting that (...)
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  • Can Healthcare Workers Reasonably Question the Duty to Care Whilst Healthcare Institutions Take a Reactive Approach to Infectious Disease Risks?Michael Millar & Desmond T. S. Hsu - 2019 - Public Health Ethics 12 (1):94-98.
    Healthcare workers carry a substantial risk of harm from infectious disease, particularly, but not exclusively, during outbreaks. More can be done by healthcare institutions to identify risks, quantify the current burden of preventable infectious disease amongst HCWs and identify opportunities for prevention. We suggest that institutional obligations should be clarified with respect to the mitigation of infectious disease risks to staff, and question the duty of HCWs to care while healthcare institutions persist with a reactive rather than proactive attitude to (...)
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  • Avian Flu Pandemic – Flight of the Healthcare Worker?Robert B. Shabanowitz & Judith E. Reardon - 2009 - HEC Forum 21 (4):365-385.
    Avian Flu Pandemic – Flight of the Healthcare Worker? Content Type Journal Article Pages 365-385 DOI 10.1007/s10730-009-9114-9 Authors Robert B. Shabanowitz, Geisinger Medical Center, Dept. of OB/GYN 100 North Academy Avenue Danville PA 17822-2920 USA Judith E. Reardon, Geisinger Medical Center Center for Health Research 100 North Academy Avenue Danville PA 17822-3003 USA Journal HEC Forum Online ISSN 1572-8498 Print ISSN 0956-2737 Journal Volume Volume 21 Journal Issue Volume 21, Number 4.
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  • The Overlapping Spheres of Medical Professionalism and Medical Ethics: A Conceptual Inquiry.Claudia W. Ruitenberg - 2016 - Ethics and Education 11 (1):79-90.
    This essay examines the concepts of ‘professionalism’ and ‘ethics’ as they are used in health professions education and, in particular, medical education. It proposes that, in order to make sense of the construct of ‘professional ethics,’ it would be helpful to conceive of professionalism and ethics as overlapping but not identical spheres. By allowing for areas of professionalism that are not directly pertinent to ethics, and areas of ethics that are not directly pertinent to the professional sphere, ‘professional ethics’ as (...)
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  • Ethics and Public Health Emergencies: Encouraging Responsibility.Matthew K. Wynia - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):1 – 4.
    The three primary ethical challenges in preparing for public health emergencies - addressing questions of rationing, restrictions and responsibilities - all entail confronting uncertainty. But the third, considering whether people and institutions will live up to their responsibilities in a crisis, is perhaps the hardest to predict and therefore plan for. The quintessential example of a responsibility during a public health emergency is that of health care professionals' obligation to continue caring for patients during epidemics. Historically, this 'duty to treat' (...)
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  • A Duty to Treat During a Pandemic? The Time for Talk is Now.Tracey M. Bailey, Rhonda J. Rosychuk, Olive Yonge & Thomas J. Marrie - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):29 – 31.
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  • Duty to Care: Acknowledging Complexity and Uncertainty.Ross Upshur & Sioban Nelson - 2008 - Nursing Inquiry 15 (4):261-262.
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