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  1. Speaking Truth to Power: Twitter Reactions to the Panama Papers.Dean Neu, Gregory Saxton, Jeffery Everett & Abu Rahaman Shiraz - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):473-485.
    The current study examines the micro-linguistic details of Twitter responses to the whistleblower-initiated publication of the Panama Papers. The leaked documents contained the micro-details of tax avoidance, tax evasion, and wealth accumulation schemes used by business elites, politicians, and government bureaucrats. The public release of the documents on April 4, 2016 resulted in a groundswell of Twitter and other social media activity throughout the world, including 161,036 Spanish-language tweets in the subsequent 5-month period. The findings illustrate that the responses were (...)
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  • Reexamining Corporate Social Responsibility and Shareholder Value: The Inverted-U-Shaped Relationship and the Moderation of Marketing Capability.Wenbin Sun, Shanji Yao & Rahul Govind - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (4):1001-1017.
    In the literature, CSR’s roles on firm performance are found to be positive, negative, or neutral. This inconclusive pattern suggests there may be a more complicated mechanism at work than the traditional focus on simple linear associations. We propose and test an inverted-U-shaped relationship between CSR and shareholder value, the fundamental measure of firm performance. Further, we incorporate a critical firm attribute, marketing capability, to moderate the nonlinear link between CSR and shareholder value, thereby exploring a previous understudied area involving (...)
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  • Is Doing Bad Always Punished? A Moderated Longitudinal Analysis on Corporate Social Irresponsibility and Firm Value.Zhihua Ding & Wenbin Sun - 2021 - Business and Society 60 (7):1811-1848.
    Theoretical evidence suggests that corporate social irresponsibility should produce long-lasting negative influences on firm performance. Yet, little empirical evidence exists in the literature to support this time-embedded research frame. This research was conducted by collecting a large set of firm data and by employing a series of vector autoregressive models to map out the longitudinal dynamic relationships between CSI and firm value under high versus low levels of two external factors, environmental dynamism and competition intensity, and one internal factor, firm (...)
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  • Positive and Negative Corporate Social Responsibility, Financial Leverage, and Idiosyncratic Risk.Saurabh Mishra & Sachin B. Modi - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (2):431-448.
    Existing research on the financial implications of corporate social responsibility (CSR) for firms has predominantly focused on positive aspects of CSR, overlooking that firms also undertake actions and initiatives that qualify as negative CSR. Moreover, studies in this area have not investigated how both positive and negative CSR affect the financial risk of firms. As such, in this research, the authors provide a framework linking both positive and negative CSR to idiosyncratic risk of firms. While investigating these relationships, the authors (...)
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  • Driven to Be Good: A Stakeholder Theory Perspective on the Drivers of Corporate Social Performance. [REVIEW]Jacob Brower & Vijay Mahajan - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (2):313-331.
    Despite growing evidence of the benefits to a firm of improving corporate social performance (CSP), many firms vary significantly in terms of their CSP activities. This research investigates how the characteristics of the stakeholder landscape influence a firm’s CSP breadth. Using stakeholder theory, we specifically propose that several factors increase the salience and impact of stakeholders’ demands on the firm and that, in response to these factors, a firm’s CSP will have greater breadth. A firm’s CSP breadth is operationalized as (...)
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  • Selection of Socially Responsible Portfolios Using Hedonic Prices.Amelia Bilbao-Terol, Mar Arenas-Parra, Verónica Cañal-Fernández & Celia Bilbao-Terol - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (3):515-529.
    This paper presents a novel framework for selecting socially responsible investment (SRI) portfolios. The Hedonic Price Method (HPM) is applied to obtain an evaluation of SRI criteria that is integrated into a multi-objective mathematical programming model. The HPM breaks away from the traditional view that goods are the direct object of utility; on the contrary, it assumes that utility is derived from the properties or characteristics of the goods themselves. As far as the investment decision is concerned, we assume that (...)
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  • Social Accountability, Ethics, and the Occupy Wall Street Protests.Dean Neu, Gregory D. Saxton & Abu S. Rahaman - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    This study examines the 3.5 m+ English-language original tweets that occurred during the 2011 Occupy Wall Street protests. Starting from previous research, we analyze how character terms such as “the banker,” “politician,” “the teaparty,” “GOP,” and “the corporation,” as well as concept terms such as “ethics,” “fairness,” “morals,” “justice,” and “democracy” were used by individual participants to respond to the Occupy Wall Street events. These character and concept terms not only allowed individuals to take an ethical stance but also accumulated (...)
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  • Do Non-Socially Responsible Companies Achieve Legitimacy Through Socially Responsible Actions? The Mediating Effect of Innovation.Belen Blanco, Encarna Guillamón-Saorín & Andrés Guiral - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):67-83.
    This study investigates the effects on organization’s financial performances of, first, the extent to which the organizations are involved in controversial business activities, and second, their level of social performance. These companies can be considered non-socially responsible given the harmful nature of the activities they are involved in. Managers of these companies may still have incentives to pursue socially responsible actions if they believe that engaging on those actions will help them to achieve legitimacy and improve investors’ perception about them. (...)
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  • The Future of Stakeholder Management Theory: A Temporal Perspective. [REVIEW]Alain Verbeke & Vincent Tung - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (3):529-543.
    We propose adding a temporal dimension to stakeholder management theory, and assess the implications thereof for firm-level competitive advantage. We argue that a firm’s competitive advantage fundamentally depends on its capacity for stakeholder management related, transformational adaptation over time. Our new temporal stakeholder management approach builds upon insights from both the resource-based view (RBV) in strategic management and institutional theory. Stakeholder agendas and their relative salience to the firm evolve over time, a phenomenon well understood in the literature, and requiring (...)
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  • Effects of Illegal Behavior on the Financial Performance of US Banking Institutions.Mohamad Jamal Zeidan - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):313-324.
    This study investigates whether financial performance is affected by corporate violations of laws and regulations. In a sample of 128 publicly traded banks that were subject to enforcement actions by US regulatory authorities over a 20-year period, we observed a significant negative market reaction pursuant to the violations. However, the market reaction did not vary meaningfully in accordance with the severity or repetitiveness of the violation. The results of this study are in conformity with previous research on industries other than (...)
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  • Alliance Network Centrality, Board Composition, and Corporate Social Performance.Craig D. Macaulay, Orlando C. Richard, Mike W. Peng & Maria Hasenhuttl - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (4):997-1008.
    What critical characteristics do firms have that determine the scale and scope of corporate social responsibility activities they undertake? This paper examines two disparate predictors of corporate social performance. First, using the lens of the resource-based view, we examine the role of alliance network centrality on corporate social performance. We find that centrality enhances corporate social performance. Second, we investigate how board composition affects corporate social performance. Specifically, drawing on stakeholder theory, we find that the percentage of female directors predicts (...)
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  • What Good Does Doing Good Do? The Effect of Bond Rating Analysts’ Corporate Bias on Investor Reactions to Changes in Social Responsibility.Oana Branzei, Jeff Frooman, Brent Mcknight & Charlene Zietsma - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (1):183-203.
    In this study, we explore how investors reconcile information on firms’ social responsibility with analysts’ assessments of future firm risk in the pricing of long-term bonds. We ask whether investors pay attention to small strides toward and/or small slips away from socially responsible behavior, arguing that analysts’ corporate bias toward gains and against losses influences investor reactions to corporate social responsibility. We hypothesize that analysts notice and reward improvements in social responsibility, yet excuse lapses. We find support for this hypothesis, (...)
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  • Employee Treatment and Contracting with Bank Lenders: An Instrumental Approach for Stakeholder Management.Haizhi Wang, Liuling Liu, Iftekhar Hasan & Bill Francis - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (4):1029-1046.
    Adopting an instrumental approach for stakeholder management, we focus on two primary stakeholder groups to investigate the relationship between employee treatment and loan contracts with banks. We find strong evidence that fair employee treatment reduces loan price and limits the use of financial covenants. In addition, we document that relationship bank lenders price both the levels and changes in the quality of employee treatment, whereas first-time bank lenders only care about the levels of fair employee treatment. Taking a contingency perspective, (...)
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  • Corporations, Stakeholders and Sustainable Development I: A Theoretical Exploration of Business–Society Relations.Reinhard Steurer, Markus E. Langer, Astrid Konrad & André Martinuzzi - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (3):263-281.
    Sustainable development (SD) – that is, “Development that meets the needs of current generations without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs and aspirations” – can be pursued in many different ways. Stakeholder relations management (SRM) is one such way, through which corporations are confronted with economic, social, and environmental stakeholder claims. This paper lays the groundwork for an empirical analysis of the question of how far SD can be achieved through SRM. It describes the so-called SD–SRM (...)
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  • Ethics and Law: Guiding the Invisible Hand to Correct Corporate Social Responsibility Externalities. [REVIEW]Paul K. Shum & Sharon L. Yam - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (4):549 - 571.
    Tokenistic short-term economic success is not good indicia of long-term success. Sustainable business success requires sustained existence in a corporation's political, economic, social, technological, legal and environmental contexts. Far beyond the traditional economic focus, consumers, governments and public interest groups alike increasingly expect the business sector to take on more social and environmental responsibilities. Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is the model in which economic, social and environmental responsibilities are fulfilled simultaneously. However, there is insufficient empirical evidence that demonstrates genuine widespread (...)
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  • Dynamics of Stakeholders' Implications in the Institutionalization of the CSR Field in France and in the United States.Emma Avetisyan & Michel Ferrary - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (1):115-133.
    This study supports the idea that fields form around issues, and describes the roles of various stakeholders in the structuring, shaping, and legitimating of the emerging field of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). A model of the institutional history of the CSR field is outlined, of which a key stage is the appearance of CSR rating agencies as the significant players and Institutional Entrepreneurs of the field. We show to which extent the creation and further development of CSR rating agencies, and (...)
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  • Stakeholder: Essentially Contested or Just Confused? [REVIEW]Samantha Miles - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (3):285-298.
    The concept of the ‘stakeholder’ has become central to business, yet there is no common consensus as to what the concept of a stakeholder means, with hundreds of different published definitions suggested. Whilst every concept is liable to be contested, for stakeholder research, this is problematic for both theoretical and empirical analysis. This article explores whether this lack of consensus is conceptual confusion, which would benefit from further debate to try to reach a higher degree of elucidation, or whether the (...)
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  • The Relationship Between Corporate Social Performance and Corporate Financial Performance in the Banking Sector.Maria-Gaia Soana - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (1):133-148.
    Since the 1970s, many Anglo-American studies have investigated the theme of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and its costs and benefits. Most studies have tried to test, largely in samples of multiple industries, the relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance (CFP). These analyses, however, have produced conflicting results and any attempt to give a generalized and coherent conclusion has proved inadequate. This article examines the ways CSP can be proxied and investigates the possible relationship between CSP (measured (...)
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  • The Moderating Effects From Corporate Governance Characteristics on the Relationship Between Available Slack and Community-Based Firm Performance.Jeffrey S. Harrison & Joseph E. Coombs - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (4):409-422.
    Recent perspectives on community investments suggest that they are opportunities for firms to create value for shareholders and other stakeholders. However, many corporate managers are still influenced by a widely held belief that such investments erode profits and are therefore unjustifiable from an agency perspective. In this paper, we refine and test theory regarding countervailing forces that influence community-based firm performance. We hypothesize that high levels of available slack will be associated with higher community-based performance, but that this relationship will (...)
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  • Collusion, Reputation Damage and Interest in Codes of Conduct: The Case of a Dutch Construction Company.Johan J. Graafland - 2004 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 13 (2-3):127-142.
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  • Political Connections and Corporate Social Responsibility: Political Incentives in China.Shan Xu & Duchi Liu - 2020 - Business Ethics: A European Review 29 (4):664-693.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
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  • Impact of Corporate Environmental Responsibility on Operating Income: Moderating Role of Regional Disparities in China.Yanhong Tang, Shuang Cui, Xin Miao & Christina Wong - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (2):363-382.
    Although the same environmental regulations apply to all regions in China, legal enforcement can be different due to local economic development priorities. There is still a lack of knowledge about how regional disparities affect the operating performance results of the implementation of corporate environmental management practices, thus providing little information for foreign companies when they invest and develop their production base in China. To fill this research gap, this paper collects data from the Fortune 500 Chinese firms to investigate the (...)
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  • How Does the Market Value Corporate Sustainability Performance?Isabel Costa Lourenço, Manuel Castelo Branco, José Dias Curto & Teresa Eugénio - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (4):417 - 428.
    This study provides empirical evidence on how corporate sustainability performance (CSP), as proxied by membership of the Dow Jones sustainability index, is reflected in the market value of equity. Using a theoretical framework combining institutional perspectives, stake-holder theory, and resource-based perspectives, we develop a set of hypotheses that relate the market value of equity to CSP. For a sample of North American firms, our preliminary results show that CSP has significant explanatory power for stock prices over the traditional summary accounting (...)
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  • Corporate Social and Financial Performance Re-Examined: Industry Effects in a Linear Mixed Model Analysis. [REVIEW]Philip L. Baird, Pinar Celikkol Geylani & Jeffrey A. Roberts - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (3):367-388.
    In this research, we shed new light on the empirical link between corporate social performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance (CFP) via the application of empirical models and methods new to the CSP–CFP literature. Applying advanced financial models to a uniquely constructed panel dataset, we demonstrate that a significant overall CSP–CFP relationship exists and that this relationship is, in part, conditioned on firms’ industry-specific context. To accommodate the estimation of time-invariant industry and industry-interaction effects, we estimate linear mixed models in (...)
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  • When Ethics Are Compromised by Ideology: The Global Competitiveness Report. [REVIEW]Harald Bergsteiner & Gayle C. Avery - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):391-410.
    The Global Competitiveness Report raises ethical issues on multiple levels. The traditional high ranking accorded the US is largely attributable to fallacies, poor science and ideology. The ideological bias finds expression in two ways: the inclusion of indices that do not provide competitive advantage, but that fit the Anglo/US ideology; and the exclusion of indices that are known to offer competitive advantage, but that do not fit the Anglo/US ideology. This flaw is compounded by methodological problems that raise further doubt (...)
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  • An Empirical Study of the World Price of Sustainability.Yuchao Xiao, Robert Faff, Philip Gharghori & Darren Lee - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):297-310.
    The core goal of this study is to empirically investigate whether there is a “world price” of corporate sustainability. This is assessed in the context of standard asset pricing models—in particular, by asking whether a risk premium attaches to a sustainability factor after controlling for the Fama–French factors. Both time-series and cross-sectional tests are formulated and applied. The results show that (1) global Fama–French factors have strong power to explain global equity returns and (2) sustainability investments have no significant impact (...)
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  • Do Investors Value a Firm’s Commitment to Social Activities?Waymond Rodgers, Hiu Lam Choy & Andrés Guiral - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (4):607-623.
    Previous empirical research has found mixed results for the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) investments on corporate financial performance (CFP). This paper contributes to the literature by exploring in a two stage investor decision-making model the relationship between a firm’s innovation effort, CSR, and financial performance. We simultaneously examine the impact of CSR on both accounting-based (financial health) and market-based (Tobin’s Q) financial performance measures. From a sample of top corporate citizens, we find that: (1) a firm’s social responsibility (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility and Firm Productivity: Evidence From the Chemical Industry in the United States.Li Sun & Marty Stuebs - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):251-263.
    Prior research suggests that participating in corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities can lead to higher future productivity. However, the empirical evidence is still scarce. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between CSR and future firm productivity in the U.S. chemical industry. Specifically, this study examines the relationship between CSR in year t and firm productivity in year (t + 1), (t + 2), and (t + 3). We use Data Envelopment Analysis, a non-parametric method, to measure (...)
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  • The Moral Floor: A Philosophical Examination of the Connection Between Ethics and Business.Brian K. Burton & Michael G. Goldsby - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (1):145-154.
    This paper examines the philosophical basis for the argument that there is a connection between ethical behavior and profitability. Both sides of this argument – that good ethics is good business and that bad ethics is bad business – are explored. The possibility of a moral floor above which ethical behavior is not rewarded is considered, and an economic experiment testing such a proposition is discussed. Johnson & Johnson suffers a potentially devastating blow when some cyanide-laced Tylenol capsules cause several (...)
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  • Labor-Friendly Corporate Practices: Is What is Good for Employees Good for Shareholders? [REVIEW]Olubunmi Faleye & Emery A. Trahan - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (1):1 - 27.
    As corporate managers interact with nonshareholder stakeholders, potential tradeoffs emerge and questions arise as to how these interactions impact shareholder value. We argue that this shareholder—stakeholder debate is an important issue within the overall corporate governance and corporate policy domain and examine one such stakeholder group - employees - by studying labor-friendly corporate practices. We find that announcements of labor-friendly policies are associated with positive abnormal stock returns. Labor-friendly firms also outperform otherwise similar firms, both in terms of long-run stock (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility, Investor Behaviors, and Stock Market Returns: Evidence From a Natural Experiment in China. [REVIEW]Maobin Wang, Chun Qiu & Dongmin Kong - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (1):127 - 141.
    This article studies how financial investors respond to firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance in terms of their investing behaviors, and how such behaviors change contingent on an event that provokes their attention and concerns to CSR. Using the melamine contamination incident in China as a natural experiment, it is found that neither the individual investors' nor the institutional investors' behaviors are influenced by firms' CSR performance before the incident. Nevertheless, in the post-event period, institutional investors' behaviors are significantly influenced (...)
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  • Does Corporate Social Responsibility Influence Firm Performance of Indian Companies?Supriti Mishra & Damodar Suar - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):571 - 601.
    This study examines whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) towards primary stakeholders influences the financial and the non-financial performance (NFP) of Indian firms. Perceptual data on CSR and NFP were collected from 150 senior-level Indian managers including CEOs through questionnaire survey.Hard data on financial performance (FP) of the companies were obtained from secondary sources. A questionnaire for assessing CSR was developed with respect to six stakeholder groups - employees, customers, investors, community, natural environment, and suppliers. A composite measure of CSR was (...)
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  • Measuring Corporate Social Performance in France: A Critical and Empirical Analysis of ARESE Data.Jacques Igalens & Jean-Pascal Gond - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (2):131-148.
    This article studies the idea of Corporate Social Performance (CSP) from a critical perspective using empirical elements derived from analysis of year 2000 ARESE data. ARESE is the French first mover social rating agency providing quantified data about the Social Performance of French companies. The paper starts out by reviewing leading CSP models and discussing problems inherent to the measurement of this construct before going on to present and analyse ARESE data - whose suitability for existing models will be discussed.
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  • What Corporate Social Responsibility Activities Are Valued by the Market?Ron Bird, Anthony D. Hall, Francesco Momentè & Francesco Reggiani - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (2):189-206.
    Corporate management is torn between either focusing solely on the interests of stockholders or taking into account the interests of a wide spectrum of stakeholders. Of course, there need be no conflict where taking the wider view is also consistent with maximising stockholder wealth. In this paper, we examine the extent to which a conflict actually exists by examining the relationship between a company's positive and negative corporate social responsibility activities and equity performance. In general, we find little evidence to (...)
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  • Reviewing the Business Case for Corporate Social Responsibility: New Evidence and Analysis. [REVIEW]Philipp Schreck - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (2):167-188.
    This study complements previous empirical research on the business case for corporate social responsibility (CSR) by employing hitherto unused data on corporate social performance (CSP) and proposing statistical analyses to account for bi-directional causality between social and financial performance. By allowing for differences in the importance of single components of CSP between industries, the data in this study overcome certain limitations of the databases used in earlier studies. The econometrics employed offer a rigorous way of addressing the problem of endogeneity (...)
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  • Ethical Commitment, Financial Performance, and Valuation: An Empirical Investigation of Korean Companies.Tae Hee Choi & Jinchul Jung - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):447-463.
    A variety of stakeholders including investors, corporate managers, customers, suppliers, employees, researchers, and government policy makers have long been interested in the relationship between the financial performance of a corporation and its commitment to business ethics. As a subject of research, the relations between business ethics and corporate valuation has yet to be thoroughly quantified and investigated. This article is an effort to amend this inadequacy by demonstrating a statistically significant association between ethical commitment and corporate valuation measures. Consistent with (...)
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  • Corporate Political Strategy: An Examination of the Relation Between Political Expenditures, Environmental Performance, and Environmental Disclosure.Charles H. Cho, Dennis M. Patten & Robin W. Roberts - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 67 (2):139-154.
    Two fundamental business ethics issues that repeatedly surface in the academic literature relate to business's role in the development of public policy [Suarez, S. L.: 2000, Does Business Learn? (The University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, MI); Roberts, R. W. and D. D. Bobek: 2004, Accounting, Organizations and Society 29(5-6), 565-590] and its role in responsibly managing the natural environment [Newton, L.: 2005, Business Ethics and the Natural Environment (Blackwell Publishing, Oxford)]. When studied together, researchers often examine if, and how, (...)
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  • Investing in Socially Responsible Companies is a Must for Public Pension Funds – Because There is No Better Alternative.S. Prakash Sethi - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (2):99 - 129.
    >With assets of over US$1.0 trillion and growing, public pension funds in the United States have become a major force in the private sector through their holding of equity positions in large publicly traded corporations. More recently, these funds have been expanding their investment strategy by considering a corporations long-term risks on issues such as environmental protection, sustainability, and good corporate citizenship, and how these factors impact a companys long-term performance. Conventional wisdom argues that the fiduciary responsibility of the pension (...)
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  • A Framework for Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility Programs as a Continuum: An Exploratory Study.Julie Pirsch, Shruti Gupta & Stacy Landreth Grau - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (2):125-140.
    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programs are increasingly popular corporate marketing strategies. This paper argues that CSR programs can fall along a continuum between two endpoints: Institutionalized programs and Promotional programs. This classification is based on an exploratory study examining the variance of four responses from the consumer stakeholder group toward these two categories of CSR. Institutionalized CSR programs are argued to be most effective at increasing customer loyalty, enhancing attitude toward the company, and decreasing consumer skepticism. Promotional CSR programs are (...)
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  • The Stakeholder Model: The Influence of the Ownership and Governance Structures.E. Jansson - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (1):1-13.
    This paper addresses the possibilities to introduce the stakeholder model in the firm, especially the possibility to give property or decision rights to stakeholders. This paper argues that it is not practical to give full property rights to more than one group of stakeholders. Decision rights to employees and creditors are already in place in some countries, but the possibility to introduce them more generally to other stakeholder groups depends very much on the governance and ownership structure of the firm (...)
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  • Drivers of Environmental Disclosure and Stakeholder Expectation: Evidence From Taiwan. [REVIEW]Cheng-Li Huang & Fan-Hua Kung - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):435 - 451.
    This article investigates stakeholder expectations associated with corporate environmental disclosure. Several articles have studied the effect that stakeholder pressure has on environmental disclosing strategies. In this article, we extend previous research to an examination of the influence of external, internal, and intermediary stakeholder groups or constituencies in turn to clarify the demands of multiple stakeholders as to firms' disclosure of sufficient and adequate environmental information. The sample comprised Taiwanese firms listed on the Taiwan Stock Exchange. Our results show that the (...)
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  • The Worth of Values – a Literature Review on the Relation Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance.Pieter van Beurden & Tobias Gössling - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):407-424.
    One of the older questions in the debate about Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is whether it is worthwhile for organizations to pay attention to societal demands. This debate was emotionally, normatively, and ideologically loaded. Up to the present, this question has been an important trigger for empirical research in CSR. However, the answer to the question has apparently not been found yet, at least that is what many researchers state. This apparent ambivalence in CSR consequences invites a literature study that (...)
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  • Addressing the Advertising of Controversial Products in China: An Empirical Approach. [REVIEW]Kim-Shyan Fam, David S. Waller & Zhilin Yang - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S1):43 - 58.
    China is a country that has undertaken a great transformation since the late 1970' s, and among these changes, has seen a massive growth in the advertising industry with the influx of foreign advertisers, and the development of regional and global media, such as satellite television and the Internet. This has resulted in the Chinese people of all ages having a greater opportunity of exposure to different types of advertising, including the advertising of potentially controversial products, which could clash with (...)
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  • Corporate Charitable Contributions: A Corporate Social Performance or Legitimacy Strategy?Jennifer C. Chen, Dennis M. Patten & Robin W. Roberts - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):131-144.
    This study examines the relation between firms' corporate philanthropic giving and their performance in three other social domains - employee relations, environmental issues, and product safety. Based on a sample of 384 U.S. companies and using data pooled from 1998 through 2000, we find that worse performers in the other social areas are both more likely to make charitable contributions and that the extent of their giving is larger than for better performers. Analyses of each separate area of social performance, (...)
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  • Corporate Environmental Responsibility and Firm Performance in the Financial Services Sector.Hoje Jo, Hakkon Kim & Kwangwoo Park - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (2):257-284.
    In this study, we examine whether corporate environmental responsibility plays a role in enhancing operating performance in the financial services sector. Because achieving success with CER investing is often a long-term process, we maintain that by effectively investing in CER, executives can decrease their firms’ environmental costs, thereby enhancing operating performance. By employing a unique environmental dataset covering 29 countries, we find that the reducing of environmental costs takes at least 1 or 2 years before enhancing return on assets. We (...)
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  • Does the Business Case Matter? The Effect of a Perceived Business Case on Small Firms’ Social Engagement.Rajat Panwar, Erlend Nybakk, Eric Hansen & Jonatan Pinkse - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (3):597-608.
    The business case for social responsibility is one of the most widely studied topics in the business and society literature that focuses on large firms. This attention is understandable because large firms have an obligation to shareholders who, as commonly assumed, seek to maximize returns on their investments, in turn, pressing corporate managers to show that firms’ expenditures in social engagement would pay off. Small firms, on the other hand, rarely face such pressures, yet the BCSR logic is increasingly applied (...)
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  • When Does It Pay to Be Good? Moderators and Mediators in the Corporate Sustainability–Corporate Financial Performance Relationship: A Critical Review.Sylvia Grewatsch & Ingo Kleindienst - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (2):383-416.
    In this paper, we review the literature on moderators and mediators in the corporate sustainability –corporate financial performance relationship. We provide some clarity on what has been learned so far by taking a contingency perspective on this much-researched relationship. Overall, we find that this research has made some progress in the past. However, we also find this research stream to be characterized by three major shortcomings, namely low degree of novelty, missing investment in theory building, and a lack of research (...)
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  • Rethinking the Corporate Financial-Social Performance Relationship: Examining the Complex, Multistakeholder Notion of Corporate Social Performance.James Weber & Jeffrey Gladstone - 2014 - Business and Society Review 119 (3):297-336.
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility: Review and Roadmap of Theoretical Perspectives.Jędrzej George Frynas & Camila Yamahaki - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (3):258-285.
    Based on a survey and content analysis of 462 peer-reviewed academic articles over the period 1990–2014, this article reviews theories related to the external drivers of corporate social responsibility and the internal drivers of CSR that have been utilized to explain CSR. The article discusses the main tenets of the principal theoretical perspectives and their application in CSR research. Going beyond previous reviews that have largely failed to investigate theory applications in CSR scholarship, this article stresses the importance of theory-driven (...)
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  • The Effect of CEOs’ Turnover on the Corporate Sustainability Performance of French Firms.Yohan Bernard, Laurence Godard & Mohamed Zouaoui - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (4):1049-1069.
    This paper examines the relationship between turnover among chief executive officers and corporate sustainability performance by identifying the influence of two major types of succession to the top job and the reasons for change. Our model also integrates the firm’s past prioritization of CSP and the impact of a company’s participation in the Global Reporting Initiative. Upper echelons theory and agency theory frameworks are adopted to understand CSP. Using an analysis of panel data for 88 public companies across 13 years (...)
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