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  1. Thinking in and About Time: A Dual Systems Perspective on Temporal Cognition.Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormack - forthcoming - Behavioral and Brain Sciences (e244):1-77.
    We outline a dual systems approach to temporal cognition, which distinguishes between two cognitive systems for dealing with how things unfold over time – a temporal updating system and a temporal reasoning system – of which the former is both phylogenetically and ontogenetically more primitive than the latter, and which are at work alongside each other in adult human cognition. We describe the main features of each of the two systems, the types of behavior the more primitive temporal updating system (...)
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  • Concepts of Animal Welfare in Relation to Positions in Animal Ethics.Kirsten Schmidt - 2011 - Acta Biotheoretica 59 (2):153-171.
    When animal ethicists deal with welfare they seem to face a dilemma: On the one hand, they recognize the necessity of welfare concepts for their ethical approaches. On the other hand, many animal ethicists do not want to be considered reformist welfarists. Moreover, animal welfare scientists may feel pressed by moral demands for a fundamental change in our attitude towards animals. The analysis of this conflict from the perspective of animal ethics shows that animal welfare science and animal ethics highly (...)
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  • Future-Oriented Objects.Brandon W. Goulding & Ori Friedman - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    Hoerl & McCormack suggest that saving tools does not require temporal reasoning. However, we identify a class of objects that are only possessed in anticipation of future needs. We propose that investigating these future-oriented objects may help identify temporal reasoning in populations where this ability is uncertain.
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  • Let Us Be Fair to 5-Year-Olds: Priority for the Young in the Allocation of Scarce Health Resources.Kelsey Gipe & Samuel J. Kerstein - 2018 - Public Health Ethics 11 (3):325-335.
    Life-saving health resources like organs for transplant and experimental medications are persistently scarce. How ought we, morally speaking, to ration these resources? Many hold that, in any morally acceptable allocation scheme, the young should to some extent be prioritized over the old. Govind Persad, Alan Wertheimer and Ezekiel Emanuel propose a multi-principle allocation scheme called the Complete Lives System, according to which persons roughly between 15 and 40 years old get priority over younger children and older adults, other things being (...)
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  • How Do Episodic and Semantic Memory Contribute to Episodic Foresight in Young Children?Gema Martin-Ordas, Cristina M. Atance & Julian S. Caza - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Retro- and Prospection for Mental Time Travel: Emergence of Episodic Remembering and Mental Rotation in 5 to 8 Year Old Children. [REVIEW]Josef Perner, Daniela Kloo & Michael Rohwer - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (3):802-815.
    We investigate the common development of children’s ability to “look back in time” and to “look into the future” . Experiment 1 with 59 children 5 to 8.5 years old showed mental rotation, as a measure of prospection, explaining specific variance of free recall, as a measure of episodic remembering when controlled for cued recall. Experiment 2 with 31 children from 5 to 6.5 years measured episodic remembering with recall of visually experienced events when controlling for recall of indirectly conveyed (...)
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  • Is Episodic Memory Uniquely Human? Evaluating the Episodic-Like Memory Research Program.Sarah Malanowski - 2016 - Synthese 193 (5):1433-1455.
    Recently, a research program has emerged that aims to show that animals have a memory capacity that is similar to the human episodic memory capacity. Researchers within this program argue that nonhuman animals have episodic-like memory of personally experienced past events. In this paper, I specify and evaluate the goals of this research program and the progress it has made in achieving them. I will examine some of the data that the research program has produced, as well as the operational (...)
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