Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Epistemic Logicism & Russell's Regressive Method.A. D. Irvine - 1989 - Philosophical Studies 55 (3):303 - 327.
  • Russell's Substitutional Theory.Peter Hylton - 1980 - Synthese 45 (1):1 - 31.
  • A Comparison of Dewey’s and Russell’s Influences on China.Ding Zijiang - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (2):149-165.
    John Dewey and Bertrand Russell visited China at around the same time in 1920. Both profoundly influenced China during the great transition period of this country. This article will focus on the differences between the two great figures that influenced China in the 1920s. This comparison will examine the following five aspects: 1. Deweyanization vs. Russellization; 2. Dewey’s “Populism” vs. Russell’s “Aristocraticism”; 3. Dewey’s “Syntheticalism” vs. Russell’s “Analyticalism”; 4. Dewey’s “Realism” vs. Russell’s “Romanticism”; 5. Dewey’s “Conservatism” vs. Russell’s “Radicalism”. This (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ende oder Wende der analytischen Philosophie und Wissenschaftstheorie?Dirk Koppelberg - 1981 - Zeitschrift Für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 12 (2):364-400.
    My concern in what follows is to give a comparative report on some important lectures held at the Hegel-Kongreß 1981 in Stuttgart. In discussing the views of Quine, Hacking, Davidson, Putnam and Habermas I want to confront them with some details of Rorty's recent critique of our philosophical tradition. At last I try to give a tentative answer whether there is an end or a turning-point for current analytical philosophy.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Concept Horse is a Concept.Ansten Klev - 2018 - Review of Symbolic Logic 11 (3):547-572.
    I offer an analysis of the sentence "the concept horse is a concept". It will be argued that the grammatical subject of this sentence, "the concept horse", indeed refers to a concept, and not to an object, as Frege once held. The argument is based on a criterion of proper-namehood according to which an expression is a proper name if it is so rendered in Frege's ideography. The predicate "is a concept", on the other hand, should not be thought of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Epistemic Diversity and the Question of Lingua Franca in Science and Philosophy.Federico Gobbo & Federica Russo - forthcoming - Foundations of Science:1-23.
    Epistemic diversity is the ability or possibility of producing diverse and rich epistemic apparati to make sense of the world around us. In this paper we discuss whether, and to what extent, different conceptions of knowledge—notably as ‘justified true belief’ and as ‘distributed and embodied cognition’—hinder or foster epistemic diversity. We then link this discussion to the widespread move in science and philosophy towards monolingual disciplinary environments. We argue that English, despite all appearance, is no Lingua Franca, and we give (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Our Cosmic Insignificance.Guy Kahane - unknown
    The universe that surrounds us is vast, and we are so very small. When we reflect on the vastness of the universe, our humdrum cosmic location, and the inevitable future demise of humanity, our lives can seem utterly insignificant. Many philosophers assume that such worries about our significance reflect a banal metaethical confusion. They dismiss the very idea of cosmic significance. This, I argue, is a mistake. Worries about cosmic insignificance do not express metaethical worries about objectivity or nihilism, and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Einstein’s 1905 ‘Annus Mirabilis’: Reconciliation of the Basic Research Traditions of Classical Physics.Rinat M. Nugayev - 2019 - Axiomathes 29 (3):207-235.
    To make out in what way Einstein’s manifold 1905 ‘annus mirabilis’ writings hang together one has to take into consideration Einstein’s strive for unity evinced in his persistent attempts to reconcile the basic research traditions of classical physics. Light quanta hypothesis and special theory of relativity turn out to be the contours of a more profound design, mere milestones of implementation of maxwellian electrodynamics, statistical mechanics and thermodynamics reconciliation programme. The conception of luminiferous ether was an insurmountable obstacle for Einstein’s (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Understanding Russell's Response to Newman.Thomas Pashby - unknown
    Russell's nonchalant response to Newman's apparently devastating critique of his structural realism presents a puzzle: if Russell conceded the point why did he not alter his theory or address the problem in print? I argue that Newman had merely pointed out an ambiguity in the formulation of Russell's theory in Analysis of Matter, and Russell already had the resources to avoid the problem through his contention that some relations are perceived. This concession gives his criterion of structural equivalence enough empirical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Revolution of Moore and Russell: A Very British Coup?: David Bell.David Bell - 1999 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 44:193-209.
    The question I shall attempt to address in what follows is an essentially historical one, namely: Why did analytic philosophy emerge first in Cambridge, in the hands of G. E. Moore and Bertrand Russell, and as a direct consequence of their revolutionary rejection of the philosophical tenets that form the basis of British Idealism? And the answer that I shall try to defend is: it didn't. That is to say, the ‘analytic’ doctrines and methods which Moore and Russell embraced in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Accommodating the Informal Notion of Class Within the Framework of Lesaniewski's Ontology.Czestaw Lejewski - 1985 - Dialectica 39 (3):217-241.
    SummaryInterpreted distributively the sentence‘Indiana is a member of the class of American federal states’means the same as‘Indiana is an American federal state’. In accordance with the collective sense of class expressions the sentence can be understood as implying that Indiana is a part of the country whose capital city is Washington. Neither interpretation appears to accommodate all the intuitions connected with the informal notion of class. A closer accommodation can be achieved, it seems, if class expressions are interpreted as verb‐like (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Idealism and the Ontological Argument.William J. Mander - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (5):993-1014.
    The ontological proof became something of a signature argument for the British Idealist movement and this paper examines how and why that was so. Beginning with an account of Hegel's understanding of the argument, it looks at how the thesis was picked up, developed and criticized by the Cairds, Bradley, Pringle-Pattison and others. The importance of Bradley's reading in particular is stressed. Lastly, consideration is given to Collingwood's lifelong interest in the proof and it is argued that his attention is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On Russell's Vulnerability to Russell's Paradox.James Levine - 2001 - History and Philosophy of Logic 22 (4):207-231.
    Influenced by G. E. Moore, Russell broke with Idealism towards the end of 1898; but in later years he characterized his meeting Peano in August 1900 as ?the most important event? in ?the most important year in my intellectual life?. While Russell discovered his paradox during his post-Peano period, the question arises whether he was already committed, during his pre-Peano Moorean period, to assumptions from which his paradox may be derived. Peter Hylton has argued that the pre-Peano Russell was thus (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • L'indétermination de la Logique. À Propos de La Norme du Vrai de Pascal Engel.Michel Seymour - 1992 - Dialogue 31 (1):87-.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Analytical Critiques of Whitehead's Metaphysics.Leemon B. Mchenry & George W. Shields - 2016 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 2 (3):483-503.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Identity, Variables, and Impredicative Definitions.K. Jaakko & J. Hintikka - 1956 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 21 (3):225-245.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • The Aim of Russell's Early Logicism: A Reinterpretation.Anders Kraal - 2014 - Synthese 191 (7):1-18.
    I argue that three main interpretations of the aim of Russell’s early logicism in The Principles of Mathematics (1903) are mistaken, and propose a new interpretation. According to this new interpretation, the aim of Russell’s logicism is to show, in opposition to Kant, that mathematical propositions have a certain sort of complete generality which entails that their truth is independent of space and time. I argue that on this interpretation two often-heard objections to Russell’s logicism, deriving from Gödel’s incompleteness theorem (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Scott Soames: The Analytic Tradition in Philosophy, Volume 1: Founding Giants.Charles R. Pigden - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (6):1671-1680.
    The Analytic Tradition in Philosophy is an excellent successor to an excellent book : It is a fine an example of the necromantic style in the history of philosophy where the object of the exercise is to resurrect the mighty dead in order to get into an argument with them, either because we think them importantly right or instructively wrong. However what was a pardonable a simplification and a reasonable omission in the earlier book has now metamorphosed into a sin (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Logic and Ontology.A. B. du Toit - 1974 - Philosophical Papers 3 (1):17-45.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark