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  1. Do We Need to Talk to Each Other? How the Concept of Experience Can Contribute to an Understanding of Bildung and Democracy.Ninni Wahlström - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (3):293-309.
    In this article I argue that the contested concept of Bildung, with its roots in the late 18th century, remains of interest in the postmodern era, even if there is also certainly a debate about it having had its day. In the specific discussion about Bildung and democracy, I suggest that Dewey's reconstructed concept of experience has several points in common with a more recent understanding of Bildung, at the same time as it can provide insight into how democracy can (...)
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  • Canonizing Dewey: Naturalism, Logical Empiricism, and the Idea of American Philosophy*: Andrew Jewett.Andrew Jewett - 2011 - Modern Intellectual History 8 (1):91-125.
    Between World War I and World War II, the students of Columbia University's John Dewey and Frederick J. E. Woodbridge built up a school of philosophical naturalism sharply critical of claims to value-neutrality. In the 1930s and 1940s, the second-generation Columbia naturalists and their students who later joined the department reacted with dismay to the arrival on American shores of logical empiricism and other analytic modes of philosophy. These figures undermined their colleague Ernest Nagel's attempt to build an alliance with (...)
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  • How Ideas of Transformative Learning Can Inform Academic Blogging.Michael Hammond - 2016 - International Journal for Transformative Research 3 (1).
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  • Dewey and Hayek on Democratic Experimentalism.Shane J. Ralston - 2012 - Contemporary Pragmatism 9 (2):93-116.
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  • A Decade of Service-Learning: A Review of the Field Ten Years After JOBE’s Seminal Special Issue. [REVIEW]Amy L. Kenworthy-U’Ren - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):811 - 822.
    This article reviews developments in the field of service-learning, both in terms of general management education and business ethics specific courses, over the past 10 years. Using the 1996 Journal of Business Ethics special issue on service-learning as a benchmark, numerous accomplishments are presented and continued barriers are discussed. Finally, three issues are raised as next steps for service-learning authors and practitioners as we move forward into the next decade: (1) designing effective and sustainable university/community partnerships, (2) addressing problems stemming (...)
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  • Dewey on Naturalism, Realism and Science.Peter Godfrey-Smith - 2002 - Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2002 (3):S25-S35.
    An interpretation of John Dewey’s views about realism, science, and naturalistic philosophy is presented. Dewey should be seen as an unorthodox realist, with respect to both general metaphysical debates about realism and with respect to debates about the aims and achievements of science.
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  • Inquiry and Virtue: A Pragmatist-Liberal Argument for Civic Education.Phillip Deen - 2012 - Journal of Social Philosophy 43 (4):406-425.
  • Locating John Dewey.William Gaudelli - 2006 - Education and Culture 21 (1):4.
  • Left Out: Pragmatism, Exceptlonallsm and the Poverty of American Marxism.Edwin A. Roberts - 1999 - Historical Materialism 4 (1):262-281.
  • Beyond Liberal Democracy: Dewey's Renascent Liberalism.Barbara J. Thayer-Bacon - 2006 - Education and Culture 22 (2):19-30.
    : My project aims to develop a relational, pluralistic political theory that moves us beyond liberal democracy, and to consider how such a theory translates into our public school settings. In this essay I argue that Dewey offers us possibilities for moving beyond one key assumption of classical liberalism, individualism, with his theory of social transaction. I focus my discussion for this paper on Dewey's renascent liberal democracy. I move from a discussion of Dewey's liberal democratic theory to what a (...)
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  • Dewey's Dynamic Integration of Vygotsky and Piaget.Susan J. Mayer - 2008 - Education and Culture 24 (2):pp. 6-24.
    Contrary to the assumptions of those who pair Dewey and Piaget based on progressivism's recent history, Dewey shared broader concerns with Vygotsky (whose work he never read). Both Dewey and Vygotsky emphasized the role of cultural forms and meanings in perpetuating higher forms of human thought, whereas Piaget focused on the role played by logical and mathematical reasoning. On the other hand, with Piaget, Dewey emphasized the nurture of independent reasoning central to the liberal Protestant heritage the two men shared. (...)
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  • Transactional Economics: John Dewey's Ways of Knowing and the Radical Subjectivism of the Austrian School.Robert Mulligan - 2006 - Education and Culture 22 (2):61-82.
    The subjectivism of the Austrian school of economics is a special case of Dewey's transactional philosophy, also known as pragmatism or pragmatic epistemology. The Austrian economists Carl Friedrich Menger (1840-1921) and Ludwig von Mises (1881-1973) adopted an Aristotelian deductive approach to economic issues such as social behavior and exchange. Like Menger and Mises, Friedrich A. Hayek (1899-1992) viewed scientific knowledge, even in the social sciences, as asserting and aiming for objective certainty. Hayek was particularly critical of attempts to apply the (...)
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  • Dewey, Women, and Weirdoes: Or, the Potential Rewards for Scholars Who Dialogue Across Difference.Wilson Craig A. Cunningham David Granger Jane Fowler Morse Barbara Stengel Terri - 2007 - Education and Culture 23 (2):pp. 27-62.
    This symposium provides five case studies of the ways that John Dewey's philosophy and practice were influenced by women or "weirdoes" (our choices include F. M. Alexander, Albert Barnes, Helen Bradford Thompson, Elsie Ripley Clapp, and Jane Addams) and presents some conclusions about the value of dialoging across difference for philosophers and other scholars.
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  • “Critique” Immanent in “Practice”: New Frankfurt School and American Pragmatism. [REVIEW]Shijun Tong - 2006 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (2):295-316.
    As a result of a new understanding of the relation between theory and practice, the "New Frankfurt School," with Jürgen Habermas as its major representative, highly values the philosophical tradition of American pragmatism, in contrast to the first generation Critical Theorists represented by Max Horkheimer. In Habermas, the idea of"critique" is, both substantially and methodologically, closely connected with the idea of "praxis" in the following senses: communicative action, rational argumentation, public discussion and political culture. "Critique" is thus found to be (...)
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  • Five Classrooms: Different Forms of 'Democracies' and Their Relationship to Cultural Pluralism(S).Michael Glassman & Min Ju Kang - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (4):365-386.
    This paper explores the issue of democracy and the role of the democratic classroom in the development of society in general, and the way in which educators understand and deal with diversity in particular. The first part of the paper explores different meanings of democracy and how they can be manifested in the classroom. We argue that the idea of a ‘democratic classroom’ is far too broad a category; democracy is defined in action and can have realist or pragmatic characteristics, (...)
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  • Pragmatism and the Unlikely Influence of German Idealism on the Academy in the United States.Todd C. Ream - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (2):150–167.
    In this article I argue that the subject‐object distinction, operative in Continental Europe during the late‐1700s and early‐1800s, led to the religion‐secular distinction in higher education in the United States. Many scholars believe the origins of the shifting nature of the religion‐secular distinction resided with some form of influence that students from the United States encountered while they pursued advanced academic work in Germany. These scholars studied this influence at an institutional or organizational level. An intellectual approach to history would (...)
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  • Why Are We Fighting? A View of the “Great War” From Across the Ocean.Timofej Dmitriev - 2014 - Studies in East European Thought 66 (1-2):51-67.
    This article examines the dispute concerning the meaning of World War I among leading American intellectuals in the period 1915–1918. Taking center stage here are the views of one of the founding fathers of American pragmatism, John Dewey, on the causes of the “Great War,” its higher meaning and goals which led to America’s entry into the War and also its influence on the social reconstruction of American society and the post-War world order. The final section of the article is (...)
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  • Education, Not Democracy? The Apolitical Dewey.Philipp Gonon - 2000 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (1-2):141-157.
    In German-speaking countries, John Dewey came to be considered a school reformer, an advocate of the project method and as the propagator of a cognitivistic psychology of learning. His ideas on socio-political reform, on the other hand, were ignored, partly intentionally, partly due to a lack of familiarity with them in detail. His major pedagogical work,Democracy and Education received little attention. In what follows, this selective view of Dewey is discussed mainly on the basis of internal pedagogical theoretical positions.
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  • The Global Community, Religion, and Education: The Modernity of Dewey’s Social Philosophy. [REVIEW]Daniel Tröhler - 2000 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (1):159-186.
    As a starting point this paper takes Dewey's nowadays oftenstressed modernity and examines his social philosophy againstthe background of the current debates on republicanism andcommunitarianism. Particularly, the anaysis of Dewey's The Public and its Problem (1927) concludesthat the attention being paid to Dewey is problematic asspecific religious assumptions – explicitly developedin A Common Faith (1934) – lie in the backgroundof his social philosophy, and are hardly being recognized.However, as it shall be shown, without considering thereligious basis, neither Dewey's social philosophy (...)
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  • The Global Community, Religion, and Education: The Modernity of Dewey’s Social Philosophy.Daniel Tröhler - 2000 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (1-2):159-186.
    As a starting point this paper takes Dewey’s nowadays often stressed modernity and examines his social philosophy against the background of the current debates on republicanism and communitarianism. Particularly, the anaysis of Dewey’sThe Public and its Problem concludes that the attention being paid to Dewey is problematic as specific religious assumptions — explicitly developed inA Common Faith -lie in the background of his social philosophy, and are hardly being recognized. However, as it shall be shown, without considering the religious basis, (...)
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  • Education, Not Democracy? The Apolitical Dewey.Philipp Gonon - 2000 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (1):141-157.
    In German-speaking countries, John Dewey came tobe considered a school reformer, an advocate of theproject method and as the propagator of acognitivistic psychology of learning. His ideas onsocio-political reform, on the other hand, wereignored, partly intentionally, partly due to a lack offamiliarity with them in detail. His major pedagogicalwork, Democracy and Education received littleattention. In what follows, this selective view ofDewey is discussed mainly on the basis of internalpedagogical theoretical positions.
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  • Introduction.Jürgen Oelkers & Heinz Rhyn - 2000 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (1):1-2.
  • Zonder Kwesties Geen Publiek.Noortje Marres - 2006 - Krisis 7 (2):36-43.
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  • John Dewey and Albert C. Barnes: A Deep and Mutually Rewarding Friendship.E. Hein George - 2017 - Dewey Studies 1 (1):44-78.
    Albert C. Barnes and John Dewey were close friends for more than three decades. Each influenced the other: Barnes’s educational activities were based to a large extent on Dewey’s educational writings, while Dewey’s conception of aesthetics was strongly influenced by Barnes. Dewey’s Art as Experience is not only dedicated to Barnes, but also includes numerous references to Barnes’s analysis of paintings. Their voluminous correspondence as well as their published work confirms both the intellectual context of their relationship and the pleasure (...)
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  • Capitalism in the Classical and High Liberal Traditions.Samuel Freeman - 2011 - Social Philosophy and Policy 28 (2):19-55.
    Liberalism generally holds that legitimate political power is limited and is to be impartially exercised, only for the public good. Liberals accordingly assign political priority to maintaining certain basic liberties and equality of opportunities; they advocate an essential role for markets in economic activity, and they recognize government's crucial role in correcting market breakdowns and providing public goods. Classical liberalism and what I call “the high liberal tradition” are two main branches of liberalism. Classical liberalism evolved from the works of (...)
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  • Character, Civic Renewal and Service Learning for Democratic Citizenship in Higher Education.John Annette - 2005 - British Journal of Educational Studies 53 (3):326-340.
    This article explores the civic republican conception of citizenship underlying the Labour government's programme of civil renewal and the introduction of education for democratic citizenship. It considers the importance of the cultivation of civic virtue through political participation for such developments and it reviews the research into how service learning linked to character education can lead to the civic virtue of duty or social responsibility.
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  • Dewey and the Question of Realism.Peter Godfrey-Smith - 2013 - Noûs 47 (4):73-89.
    An interpretation is given of John Dewey's views about “realism” in metaphysics, and of how these views relate to contemporary debates. Dewey rejected standard formulations of realism as a general metaphysical position, and interpreters have often been taken him to be sympathetic to some form of verificationism or constructivism. I argue that these interpretations are mistaken, as Dewey's unease with standard formulations of realism comes from his philosophical emphasis on intelligent control of events, by means of ordinary action. Because of (...)
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  • Is Thoreau More Cosmopolitan Than Dewey? Saito - 2012 - The Pluralist 7 (3):71-85.
    In 1921 John Dewey published an article on "mutual national understanding" based upon his real experience of encountering foreign cultures in Japan and China ("Creative Democracy" 228). The article echoes his democratic spirit of learning from difference beyond national and cultural boundaries. The vitality of his American philosophy and its potency in a global context are still evident today. Some of the recent research on Dewey is plain enough evidence of this (Hickman; Hansen). Neither fixed within national ground nor appealing (...)
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  • Hegel's Theory of Freedom.Craig Matarrese - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (2):170–186.
    Hegel’s theory of freedom is complex and sweeping, and while most interpreters of Hegel will readily agree that it is the centerpiece of his political philosophy, perhaps also of his social philosophy and philosophy of history, they will just as readily disagree about what exactly the theory claims. Such interpretive disagreements have fueled, in large part, the resurgence of interest in Hegelian philosophy over the last few decades.
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  • John Dewey, Gothic and Modern.James S. Kaminsky - 2010 - British Journal of Educational Studies 58 (3):249-266.
    It is argued here that understanding John Dewey's thought as that of a prodigal liberal or a fellow traveller does not capture the complexity of his work. It is also important to recognise the portion of his work that is historie morale. In the very best sense it is epic, encapsulating the hopes and dreams of a history of the American people in the early 1900s. It is a work that simultaneously pursues modernity and the past — for the sake (...)
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  • Dewey on Naturalism, Realism and Science.Peter Godfrey‐Smith - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 69 (S3):S25-S35.
    An interpretation of John Dewey’s views about realism, science, and naturalistic philosophy is presented. Dewey should be seen as an unorthodox realist, with respect to both general metaphysical debates about realism and with respect to debates about the aims and achievements of science.
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  • A Decade of Service-Learning: A Review of the Field Ten Years After JOBE’s Seminal Special Issue. [REVIEW]Amy L. Kenworthy-U’Ren - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):811-822.
    This article reviews developments in the field of service-learning, both in terms of general management education and business ethics specific courses, over the past 10 years. Using the 1996 Journal of Business Ethics special issue on service-learning as a benchmark, numerous accomplishments are presented and continued barriers are discussed. Finally, three issues are raised as next steps for service-learning authors and practitioners as we move forward into the next decade: designing effective and sustainable university/community partnerships, addressing problems stemming from the (...)
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  • Pragmatist Conception of Participatory Democracy1.Emil Višňovský - 2008 - Human Affairs 18 (1).
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