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  1. How Defining Clinical Practices May Influence Their Evaluation: The Case of Continuous Sedation at the End of Life.Kasper Raus & Sigrid Sterckx - 2016 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 22 (3):425-432.
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  • Moral Neutralization: Nurses’ Evolution in Unethical Climate Workplaces.Hamideh Hakimi, Soodabeh Joolaee, Mansoureh Ashghali Farahani, Patricia Rodney & Hadi Ranjbar - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-10.
    Introduction Good quality of care is dependent on nurses’ strong clinical skills and moral competencies, as well. While most nurses work with high moral standards, the moral performance of some nurses in some organizations shows a deterioration in their moral sensitivity and actions. The study reported in this paper aimed to explore the experiences of nurses regarding negative changes in their moral practice. Materials and methods This was a qualitative study utilizing an inductive thematic analysis approach, which was conducted from (...)
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  • Physicians’ Practices When Frustrating Patients’ Needs: A Comparative Study of Restrictiveness in Offering Abortion and Sedation Therapy: Table 1.Niels Lynøe - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (5):306-309.
    In this paper it is argued that physicians’ restrictive attitudes in offering abortions during 1946–1965 in Sweden were due to their private values. The values, however, were rarely presented openly. Instead physicians’ values influenced their assessment of the facts presented—that is, the women's’ trustworthiness. In this manner the physicians were able to conceal their private values and impede the women from getting what they wanted and needed. The practice was concealed from both patients and physicians and never publicly discussed. It (...)
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  • Palliative Sedation, Foregoing Life-Sustaining Treatment, and Aid-in-Dying: What is the Difference?Patrick Daly - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (3):197-213.
    After a review of terminology, I identify—in addition to Margaret Battin’s list of five primary arguments for and against aid-in-dying—the argument from functional equivalence as another primary argument. I introduce a novel way to approach this argument based on Bernard Lonergan’s generalized empirical method. Then I proceed on the basis of GEM to distinguish palliative sedation, palliative sedation to unconsciousness when prognosis is less than two weeks, and foregoing life-sustaining treatment from aid-in-dying. I conclude that aid-in-dying must be justified on (...)
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  • Der Leidensbegriff Im Medizinischen Kontext: Ein Problemaufriss Am Beispiel der Tiefen Palliativen Sedierung Am LebensendeThe Concept of Suffering in Medicine: An Investigation Using the Example of Deep Palliative Sedation at the End of Life.Claudia Bozzaro - 2015 - Ethik in der Medizin 27 (2):93-106.
    ZusammenfassungDas Lindern von Leiden ist eine zentrale Aufgabe der Medizin. Seit einigen Jahren ist eine verstärkte Inanspruchnahme des Leidensbegriffs im medizinischen Kontext zu beobachten. Eine Reflexion und Klärung dessen, was mit dem Begriff „Leiden“ und Begriffen wie „unerträgliches Leiden“ gemeint ist, bleibt aber weitgehend aus. Diese Tatsache wirft eine Reihe von theoretischen und praktischen Problemen auf, die im vorliegenden Beitrag identifiziert und diskutiert werden. Dazu werden zunächst die Schwierigkeiten bei der Anwendung des Leidensbegriffs in der medizinischen Praxis am Beispiel der (...)
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