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  1. Organ Donation After Assisted Death: Is It More or Less Ethically-Problematic Than Donation After Circulatory Death?Jeffrey Kirby - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (4):629-635.
    A provocative question has emerged since the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision on assisted dying: Should Canadians who request, and are granted, an assisted death be considered a legitimate source of transplantable organs? A related question is addressed in this paper: is controlled organ donation after assisted death more or less ethically-problematic than standard, controlled organ donation after circulatory determination of death? Controversial, ethics-related dimensions of cDCD that are of relevance to this research question are explored, and morally-relevant distinctions between (...)
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  • Palliative Sedation and Medical Assistance in Dying: Distinctly Different or Simply Semantics?Reanne Booker & Anne Bruce - 2020 - Nursing Inquiry 27 (1).
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  • Morally-Relevant Similarities and Differences Between Assisted Dying Practices in Paradigm and Non-Paradigm Circumstances: Could They Inform Regulatory Decisions?Jeffrey Kirby - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (4):475-483.
    There has been contentious debate over the years about whether there are morally relevant similarities and differences between the three practices of continuous deep sedation until death, physician-assisted suicide, and voluntary euthanasia. Surprisingly little academic attention has been paid to a comparison of the uses of these practices in the two types of circumstances in which they are typically performed. A comparative domains of ethics analysis methodological approach is used in the paper to compare 1) the use of the three (...)
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  • Signposts in a Familiar Land?: A Second Look at Lingering Bioethical Concerns.Michael A. Ashby & Leigh E. Rich - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):119-124.
  • Der Leidensbegriff Im Medizinischen Kontext: Ein Problemaufriss Am Beispiel der Tiefen Palliativen Sedierung Am LebensendeThe Concept of Suffering in Medicine: An Investigation Using the Example of Deep Palliative Sedation at the End of Life.Claudia Bozzaro - 2015 - Ethik in der Medizin 27 (2):93-106.
    ZusammenfassungDas Lindern von Leiden ist eine zentrale Aufgabe der Medizin. Seit einigen Jahren ist eine verstärkte Inanspruchnahme des Leidensbegriffs im medizinischen Kontext zu beobachten. Eine Reflexion und Klärung dessen, was mit dem Begriff „Leiden“ und Begriffen wie „unerträgliches Leiden“ gemeint ist, bleibt aber weitgehend aus. Diese Tatsache wirft eine Reihe von theoretischen und praktischen Problemen auf, die im vorliegenden Beitrag identifiziert und diskutiert werden. Dazu werden zunächst die Schwierigkeiten bei der Anwendung des Leidensbegriffs in der medizinischen Praxis am Beispiel der (...)
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  • Addressing the Concerns Surrounding Continuous Deep Sedation in Singapore and Southeast Asia: A Palliative Care Approach.Lalit Kumar Radha Krishna - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (3):461-475.
    The application of continuous deep sedation in the treatment of intractable suffering at the end of life continues to be tied to a number of concerns that have negated its use in palliative care. Part of the resistance towards use of this treatment option of last resort has been the continued association of CDS with physician-associated suicide and/or euthanasia, which is compounded by a lack clinical guidelines and a failure to cite this treatment under the aegis of a palliative care (...)
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