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  1. ‘Equal Play, Equal Pay’: Moral Grounds for Equal Pay in Football.Alfred Archer & Martine Prange - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (3):416-436.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, we investigate three different ways of defending the claim that national football associations ought to pay their men’s and women’s football teams the same amount. First, we...
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  • Challenging Sex Segregation: A Philosophical Evaluation of the Football Association’s Rules on Mixed Football.Lisa Edwards, Paul Davis & Alison Forbes - 2015 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 9 (4):389-400.
    The Football Association has been under pressure to allow girls to play in mixed teams since 1978, following 12-year old Theresa Bennett’s application to play with boys in a local league. In 1991, over a decade after Bennett’s legal challenge, the FA agreed to remove its ban on mixed football and introduced Rule C4 in order to permit males and females to play together in competitive matches under the age of 11. More recently, following a campaign by parents, coaches, local (...)
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  • Transwomen in Elite Sport: Scientific and Ethical Considerations.Taryn Knox, Lynley C. Anderson & Alison Heather - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):395-403.
    The inclusion of elite transwomen athletes in sport is controversial. The recent International Olympic Committee guidelines allow transwomen to compete in the women’s division if their testosterone is held below 10 nmol/L. This is significantly higher than that of cis-women. Science demonstrates that high testosterone and other male physiology provides a performance advantage in sport suggesting that transwomen retain some of that advantage. To determine whether the advantage is unfair necessitates an ethical analysis of the principles of inclusion and fairness. (...)
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  • Is It Defensible for Women to Play Fewer Sets Than Men in Grand Slam Tennis?Paul Davis & Lisa Edwards - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):388-407.
    Lacking in the philosophy of sport is discussion of the gendered numbers of sets played in Grand Slam tennis. We argue that the practice is indefensible. It can be upheld only through false beliefs about women or repressive femininity ideals. It treats male tennis players unfairly in forcing them to play more sets because of their sex. Its ideological consequences are pernicious, since it reinforces the respective identifications of the female and male with physical limitation and heroism. Both sexes have (...)
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  • Beyond Fairness: The Ethics of Inclusion for Transgender and Intersex Athletes.John Gleaves & Tim Lehrbach - 2016 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 43 (2):311-326.
    Sporting communities remain entangled in debate over whether and how to include transgender and intersex athletes in competition with cisgender athletes. Of particular concern is that transgender and intersex athletes may have unfair physiological advantages over their cisgender opponents. Arguments for inclusion of transgender and intersex athletes in sport attempt to demonstrate that such inclusion does not threaten the presumed physiological equivalence among competitors and is therefore fair to all. This article argues that the physiological equivalency rationale has significant limitations, (...)
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  • Not Forgetting Sex: Simon on Gender Equality.Pam R. Sailors - 2016 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 43 (1):75-82.
  • Sport and the Obligation of Solidarity.Wivi Andersen & Sigmund Loland - 2015 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 9 (3):243-256.
    The paper departs from an analysis of the case of Michelle Dumaresq, a transgender female downhill mountain biker who experienced marginalization within her sport. The analysis is based on Axel Honneth’s theory of recognition. The Dumaresq case is particularly relevant to Honneth’s ideas of solidarity, which provide insight into the dynamics of social integration. Honneth’s theory of recognition also provides a conceptual framework and a methodology that gives new perspectives on the ethical significance of sport. In the paper, an analysis (...)
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  • Racers, Pacers, Gender and Records: On the Meaning of Sport Competition and Competitors.Danny Rosenberg & Pam Sailors - 2014 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (2):172-190.
    This paper examines footraces that are paced and unpaced, and runners who are pre-arranged, designated pacers and those who are not. Although pacesetting is commonplace in footraces today, the practice challenges our conception of sport competition, the nature of competitors and the meaning of records. For example, Bale calls paced races as ‘staged experiments’ to set world records and argues that pacers were crucial in the running career of Roger Bannister. In 2011, the International Association of Athletics Federation banned women’s (...)
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