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  1. Doing Good, Feeling Good? Entrepreneurs’ Social Value Creation Beliefs and Work-Related Well-Being.Steven A. Brieger, Dirk De Clercq & Timo Meynhardt - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (4):707-725.
    Entrepreneurs with social goals face various challenges; insights into how these entrepreneurs experience and appreciate their work remain a black box though. Drawing on identity, conservation of resources, and person–organization fit theories, this study examines how entrepreneurs’ social value creation beliefs relate to their work-related well-being, as well as how this process might be influenced by social concerns with respect to the common good. Using data from the German Public Value Atlas 2015 and 2019 and the Swiss Public Value Atlas (...)
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  • Hybrid Forms of Business: The Logic of Gift in the Commercial World. [REVIEW]Wolfgang Grassl - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (S1):109-123.
    Benedict XVI in Caritas in Veritate advances a positive view of businesses that are hybrids between several traditional categories. He expects that the “logic of gift” that animates civil society infuses the market and the State with relations typical for it—reciprocity, gratuitousness, and solidarity. His theological rationale offers an answer to two questions that have largely remained open in the literature—why hybridization of business occurs and why it is desirable. A rational reconstruction of hybrid enterprise that goes beyond a simple (...)
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  • The Role of Compassion in Shaping Social Entrepreneurs’ Prosocial Opportunity Recognition.Ronit Yitshaki, Fredric Kropp & Benson Honig - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-31.
    Compassion is acknowledged as a key motivational source of prosocial opportunity recognition. This study examines the underlying processes of different types of compassion that lead to prosocial OR interventions designed to solve or ameliorate social problems. Self-compassion is associated with intimate personal experiences of suffering and encompasses a desire to alleviate the distress of others based on common humanity, mental distance and mindfulness. Other-regarding compassion is associated with value structures and social awareness and is based on a desire to help (...)
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  • How is Business Adapting to Climate Change Impacts Appropriately? Insight From the Commercial Port Sector.Changmin Jiang, Kevin Li, Zaili Yang, Tianni Wang & Adolf Ng - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (4):1029-1047.
    Adaptation to climate change impacts is a key research topic in business ethics that poses substantial implications on the good lives of human beings. The commercial port sector is a highly relevant study focus with its pivotal roles in supply chains and international trade. Hence, it is important to investigate whether the port planning system and practice is appropriate in tackling climate change impacts. But beforehand, we must thoroughly understand the attitude and behaviors of port planners and operators on ports’ (...)
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  • A Social Mission is Not Enough: Reflecting the Normative Foundations of Social Entrepreneurship.Ignas Bruder - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  • Social entrepreneurship and impact investment in rural–urban transformation: An orientation to systemic social innovation and symposium findings.Xiangping Jia & Geoffrey Desa - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (4):1217-1239.
    Migrations from rural to urban areas do not occur equitably. Food, economic, and health systems are strained by this global rural–urban transformation. Climate change exacerbates agricultural shifts and biodiversity loss. The fields of social entrepreneurship and social innovation address these systemic inequities by re-envisioning challenges as opportunities for positive change. Innovative finance models emerge in support of such initiatives. Despite this transformative potential, social innovators face significant challenges when mobilizing resources, and when moving beyond niche endeavors to scale impacts that (...)
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  • Social Entrepreneurship in Non-Munificent Institutional Environments and Implications for Institutional Work: Insights From China.Babita Bhatt, Israr Qureshi & Suhaib Riaz - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (3):605-630.
    We investigate the research question: Why are there very few social enterprises in China? Our findings unpack four types of institutional challenges to social entrepreneurship, as perceived by social entrepreneurs: norms of a strong role for government; misunderstood or unknown role for social enterprises; non-supportive rules and regulations; and lack of socio-cultural values and beliefs in support of social goals. We contribute to the literature on social enterprises by showing how an institutional environment may be “non-munificent,” i.e., non-supportive for the (...)
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  • Ethics, Technology and Organizational Innovation.Stefano Brusoni & Antonino Vaccaro - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (2):223-226.
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  • Social Enterprises, Venture Philanthropy and the Alleviation of Income Inequality.Francesco Di Lorenzo & Mariarosa Scarlata - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (2):307-323.
    Building on the literature on hybrid organizations, this manuscript explores the relationship between the organizational activity of social enterprises backed by venture philanthropy investors and income inequality. Using Ashoka’s portfolio of Indian social enterprises as empirical context of Western venture philanthropy investing activity, our results suggest that Indian municipalities with social enterprises that have received venture philanthropy investments experience a decrease in income inequality level and when these social enterprises are dominated by a collectivistic organizational identity orientation the effect is (...)
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  • Managing Value Tensions in Collective Social Entrepreneurship: The Role of Temporal, Structural, and Collaborative Compromise.Björn C. Mitzinneck & Marya L. Besharov - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (2):381-400.
    Social entrepreneurship increasingly involves collective, voluntary organizing efforts where success depends on generating and sustaining members’ participation. To investigate how such participatory social ventures achieve member engagement in pluralistic institutional settings, we conducted a qualitative, inductive study of German Renewable Energy Source Cooperatives. Our findings show how value tensions emerge from differences in RESCoop members’ relative prioritization of community, environmental, and commercial logics, and how cooperative leaders manage these tensions and sustain member participation through temporal, structural, and collaborative compromise strategies. (...)
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  • Made in Carcere: Integral Human Development in Extreme Conditions.Luca Mongelli, Pietro Versari, Francesco Rullani & Antonino Vaccaro - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (4):977-995.
    This paper analyzes the case of Made in Carcere, an innovative social enterprise providing jobs to one of the most marginalized groups in society: convicted women. Relying on an extensive database that covers 8 years of activity, we propose a micro-level analysis of the processes adopted by Made in Carcere to foster the integral human development of convicted women, its target stakeholders. We show that this complex effort has successfully unfolded through two macro-processes: creating a safe space for experimentation and (...)
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  • Valuing Value in Innovation Ecosystems: How Cross-Sector Actors Overcome Tensions in Collaborative Sustainable Business Model Development.Ard-Pieter de Man, Bart Bossink & Inge Oskam - 2021 - Business and Society 60 (5):1059-1091.
    This article aims to uncover the processes of developing sustainable business models in innovation ecosystems. Innovation ecosystems with sustainability goals often consist of cross-sector partners and need to manage three tensions: the tension of value creation versus value capture, the tension of mutual value versus individual value, and the tension of gaining value versus losing value. The fact that these tensions affect all actors differently makes the process of developing a sustainable business model challenging. Based on a study of four (...)
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  • Commons Organizing: Embedding Common Good and Institutions for Collective Action. Insights from Ethics and Economics.Laura Albareda & Alejo Jose G. Sison - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 166 (4):727-743.
    In recent years, business ethics and economic scholars have been paying greater attention to the development of commons organizing. The latter refers to the processes by which communities of people work in common in the pursuit of the common good. In turn, this promotes commons organizational designs based on collective forms of common goods production, distribution, management and ownership. In this paper, we build on two main literature streams: the ethical approach based on the theory of the common good of (...)
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  • Ethical Judgments About Social Entrepreneurship in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Influence of Spatio-Cultural Meanings.Maria Margarida De Avillez, Andrew Greenman & Susan Marlow - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (4):877-892.
    Within this paper, we adopt a qualitative process approach to explore how ethical judgments are influenced by spatio-cultural meanings applied to social entrepreneurship in the context of Mozambique. We analyse how such ethical judgments emerged using data gathered over a 4 year period in Maputo. Our findings illustrate three modes used to inform ethical judgments: embracing, rejecting and integrating. These describe how ethical judgments transpire as participants evaluate social entrepreneurship drawing upon related global normative meanings and those embedded within the (...)
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  • What’s in a Name: An Analysis of Impact Investing Understandings by Academics and Practitioners.Anna Katharina Höchstädter & Barbara Scheck - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (2):449-475.
    Recently, there has been much talk of impact investing. Around the world, specialized intermediaries have appeared, mainstream financial players and governments have become involved, renowned universities have included impact investing courses in their curriculum, and a myriad of practitioner contributions have been published. Despite all this activity, conceptual clarity remains an issue: The absence of a uniform definition, the interchangeable use of alternative terms and unclear boundaries to related concepts such as socially responsible investment are being criticized. This article aims (...)
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  • Measuring the Integration of Social and Environmental Missions in Hybrid Organizations.Edward N. Gamble, Simon C. Parker & Peter W. Moroz - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 167 (2):271-284.
    This paper introduces a new typology and associated measure of social and environmental mission integration by conceptually framing a feature of hybrid organizations—the degree of integration of their revenue model and social–environmental mission. The SEMI measure is illustrated using a hand-collected sample of 256 North American Certified B Corporations. We explore the heterogeneity of SEMI scores by identifying external-facing correlates and demonstrate non-congruence with Certified B Corporation’s audit results. Overall, our findings advance existing knowledge of these hybrid organizations and how (...)
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  • Prosociality in Business: A Human Empowerment Framework.Steven A. Brieger, Siri A. Terjesen, Diana M. Hechavarría & Christian Welzel - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (2):361-380.
    This study introduces a human empowerment framework to better understand why some businesses are more socially oriented than others in their policies and activities. Building on Welzel’s theory of emancipation, we argue that human empowerment—comprised of four components: action resources, emancipative values, social movement activity, and civic entitlements—enables, motivates, and entitles individuals to pursue social goals for their businesses. Using a sample of over 15,000 entrepreneurs from 43 countries, we report strong empirical evidence for two ecological effects of the framework (...)
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  • Mapping the Intellectual Structure of Social Entrepreneurship Research: A Citation/Co-Citation Analysis.Pradeep Kumar Hota, Balaji Subramanian & Gopalakrishnan Narayanamurthy - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 166 (1):89-114.
    In this paper, we employ bibliometric analysis to empirically analyse the research on social entrepreneurship published between 1996 and 2017. By employing methods of citation analysis, document co-citation analysis, and social network analysis, we analyse 1296 papers containing 74,237 cited references and uncover the structure, or intellectual base, of research on social entrepreneurship. We identify nine distinct clusters of social entrepreneurship research that depict the intellectual structure of the field. The results provide an overall perspective of the social entrepreneurship field, (...)
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  • How to Make Social Entrepreneurship Sustainable? A Diagnosis and a Few Elements of a Response.Erwan Lamy - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (3):645-662.
    Social entrepreneurship is a precarious activity that must always strike a delicate balance between commercial principles and social concerns. There is no shortage of discussion concerning the possible solutions that could help to maintain this balance, and social entrepreneurs are striving to reconcile conflicting aims on a daily basis, but the economic roots of this precariousness remain. Based on an analysis of these root causes, we propose a new radical approach to this precariousness, “radical” in the etymological sense of the (...)
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  • An Examination of Tensions in a Hybrid Collaboration: A Longitudinal Study of an Empty Homes Project.Alex Gillett, Kim Loader, Bob Doherty & Jonathan M. Scott - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (4):949-967.
    We analyse the tensions in a hybrid collaboration and how these are mitigated using boundary-spanning community impact, leading to compatibility between distinctive institutional logics. Our qualitative longitudinal study undertaken during 2011–2016 involved reviewing literature and archival data, key informant interviews, workshop and focus groups. We analysed common themes within the data, relating to our two research questions concerning how and why hybrids collaborate, and how resulting tensions are mitigated. The findings suggest a viable model of service delivery termed hybridized collaboration (...)
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  • Emprendimiento Social, ¿Alternativa o Continuidad a Las Consecuencias Del Sistema Neoliberal Al Que Busca Responder?Luis Portales - 2018 - Recerca.Revista de Pensament I Anàlisi 23:43-66.
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  • Achieving Shared Triple Bottom Line (TBL) Value Creation: Toward a Social Resource-Based View (SRBV) of the Firm.Wendy L. Tate & Lydia Bals - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (3):803-826.
    While the economic and environmental dimensions of the triple bottom line have been covered extensively by management theory and practice, the social dimension remains largely underrepresented. The resource-based view of the firm and the natural resource-based view of the firm are revisited to lay the theoretical foundation for exploring how the social dimension might be addressed. Social capabilities are then explored by looking at the social entrepreneurship literature and illustrative cases with the purpose of elaborating RBV toward a social resource-based (...)
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  • How is Business Adapting to Climate Change Impacts Appropriately? Insight From the Commercial Port Sector.Adolf K. Y. Ng, Tianni Wang, Zaili Yang, Kevin X. Li & Changmin Jiang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (4):1029-1047.
    Adaptation to climate change impacts is a key research topic in business ethics that poses substantial implications on the good lives of human beings. The commercial port sector is a highly relevant study focus with its pivotal roles in supply chains and international trade. Hence, it is important to investigate whether the port planning system and practice is appropriate in tackling climate change impacts. But beforehand, we must thoroughly understand the attitude and behaviors of port planners and operators on ports’ (...)
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  • Sustainable Entrepreneurship: The Role of Perceived Barriers and Risk.Brigitte Hoogendoorn, Peter van der Zwan & Roy Thurik - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (4):1133-1154.
    Entrepreneurs who start a business to serve both self-interests and collective interests by addressing unmet social and environmental needs are usually referred to as sustainable entrepreneurs. Compared with regular entrepreneurs, we argue that sustainable entrepreneurs face specific challenges when establishing their businesses owing to the discrepancy between the creation and appropriation of private value and social value. We hypothesize that when starting a business, sustainable entrepreneurs feel more hampered by perceived barriers, such as the institutional environment and have a different (...)
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  • The Bright Side of Hybridity: Exploring How Social Enterprises Manage and Leverage Their Hybrid Nature.Tomislav Rimac, Tommaso Ramus, Francesco Rullani & Luca Mongelli - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (2):301-305.
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  • Toward A Positive Theory of Social Entrepreneurship. On Maximizing Versus Satisficing Value Capture.Alejandro Agafonow - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (4):1-5.
    In a recent issue of the Journal of Business Ethics, Filipe M. Santos posits that social entrepreneurs maximize not on value capture, but on value creation, only satisficing on value capture to fuel operations, reinvesting in growth, whatever the specific combination of institutional means is deemed appropriate. No doubt the analytical framework of value creation and value capture casts new light on the phenomenon of social entrepreneurship, but we think Santos is asking too much by advocating a shift in focus (...)
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  • The Ethics of Entrepreneurial Shared Value.Patricio Osorio-Vega - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (4):981-995.
    In the business ethics literature, the growing interest in social entrepreneurship has remained limited to the assumption that pursuing a social mission will clash against the pursuit of associated economic achievements. This ignores recent developments in the social entrepreneurship literature which show that social missions and economic achievement can also have a mutually constitutive relation. We address this gap adopting the notion of shared value for an ethical inquiry of social entrepreneurship. Using a sensemaking framework, we assume that the emergence (...)
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  • Visionaries and Wayfinders: Deliberate and Emergent Pathways to Vision in Social Entrepreneurship.Sandra Waddock & Erica Steckler - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (4):719-734.
    This study explores the pathways from the aspiration to make a difference in the world to vision and action of social entrepreneurs. Based on the qualitative analysis of interviews with 23 individuals who have pioneered institutions and initiatives around corporate responsibility, we find two predominant pathways to vision. The deliberate path starts with aspiration and moves through purpose toward a relatively intentional vision that ultimately leads to, and is subsequently informed by, action. The emergent path also begins with aspiration then (...)
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  • Beyond the Moral Portrayal of Social Entrepreneurs: An Empirical Approach to Who They Are and What Drives Them.Sophie Bacq, Chantal Hartog & Brigitte Hoogendoorn - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (4):703-718.
    This paper questions the taken-for-granted moral portrayal depicted in the extant literature and popular media of the devoted social entrepreneurial hero with a priori good ethical and moral credentials. We confront this somewhat ‘idealistic’ and biased portrayal with insights from unique large-scale data from the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor 2009 survey on social entrepreneurship covering Belgium and The Netherlands. Binary and multinomial logistic regressions indicate that the intention and dominance of perceived social value creation over economic value creation is indeed what (...)
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  • Managing Relational Conflict in Korean Social Enterprises: The Role of Participatory HRM Practices, Diversity Climate, and Perceived Social Impact.Jeong Won Lee, Long Zhang, Matt Dallas & Hyun Chin - 2019 - Business Ethics: A European Review 28 (1):19-35.
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  • From Caring Entrepreneur to Caring Enterprise: Addressing the Ethical Challenges of Scaling Up Social Enterprises.Kevin André & Anne-Claire Pache - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (4):659-675.
    This paper advances the conception of social entrepreneurs as caring entrepreneurs. We argue that the care ethics of social entrepreneurs, implying the pursuit of caring goals through caring processes, can be challenged when they engage in the process of scaling up their ventures. We propose that social entrepreneurs can sustain their care ethics as the essential dimension of their venture only if they are able to build a caring enterprise. Organizational care designates the set of organizing principles that facilitate the (...)
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  • A Fair Trade-Off? Paradoxes in the Governance of Fair-Trade Social Enterprises.Chris Mason & Bob Doherty - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (3):451-469.
    This paper explores how fair trade social enterprises manage paradoxes in stakeholder-oriented governance models. We use narrative accounts from board members, at governance events and board documents to report an exploratory study of paradoxes in three FTSEs which are partly farmer-owned. Having synthesized the key social enterprise governance literature and framed it alongside the broader paradox theory, we used narratives to explore how tensions are articulated, how they can be applied within an adapted paradox framework, and how governance actors seek (...)
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  • The Impact of Moral Intensity and Desire for Control on Scaling Decisions in Social Entrepreneurship.Brett R. Smith, Geoffrey M. Kistruck & Benedetto Cannatelli - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (4):677-689.
    While research has focused on why certain entrepreneurs elect to create innovative solutions to social problems, very little is known about why some social entrepreneurs choose to scale their solutions while others do not. Research on scaling has generally focused on organizational characteristics often overlooking factors at the individual level that may affect scaling decisions. Drawing on the multidimensional construct of moral intensity, we propose a theoretical model of ethical decision making to explain why a social entrepreneur’s perception of moral (...)
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  • A Resource-Based View of Social Entrepreneurship: How Stewardship Culture Benefits Scale of Social Impact.Sophie Bacq & Kimberly A. Eddleston - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (3):589-611.
    Despite efforts to address societal ills, social enterprises face challenges in increasing their impact. Drawing from the RBV, we argue that a social enterprise’s scale of social impact depends on its capabilities to engage stakeholders, attract government support, and generate earned-income. We test our hypotheses on a sample of 171 US-based social enterprises and find support for the hypothesized relationships between these organizational capabilities and scale of social impact. Further, we find that these relationships are contingent upon stewardship culture. Specifically, (...)
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  • Ingredients Matter: How the Human Capital of Philanthropic and Traditional Venture Capital Differs.Mariarosa Scarlata, Jennifer Walske & Andrew Zacharakis - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (3):623-635.
    Philanthropic venture capital, like traditional venture capital, provides funding and value-added services to a portfolio of entrepreneurial firms. However, TVC differs from PhVC, as the primary goal of TVC is to maximize the economic return of its investments. In contrast, PhVC firms expect their portfolio companies to perform well in terms of both social and economic returns. Using both American and European firms, this paper explores and compares the human capital in PhVC and TVC firm founders. Our results show that (...)
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  • Social or Commercial? Innovation Strategies in Social Enterprises at Times of Turbulence.Tommaso Ramus, Barbara La Cara, Antonino Vaccaro & Stefano Brusoni - 2018 - Business Ethics Quarterly 28 (4):463-492.
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  • Stakeholder Judgments of Value.Leena Lankoski, N. Craig Smith & Luk Van Wassenhove - 2016 - Business Ethics Quarterly 26 (2):227-256.
  • Are Farmers in Alternative Food Networks Social Entrepreneurs? Evidence From a Behavioral Approach.Giuseppina Migliore, Giorgio Schifani, Pietro Romeo, Shadi Hashem & Luigi Cembalo - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (5):885-902.
    Social entrepreneurship, individual activities with a social objective, is used in this study as a conceptual tool for empirically examining farmers’ participation in alternative food networks. This study verifies whether their participation is driven by the social entrepreneurship dimension to satisfy social and environmental needs. We develop a more inclusive view of how social entrepreneurship is present among farmers participating in AFNs by using a behavioural approach based on three main psychological constructs: attitude, objective, and behaviour. The empirical results show (...)
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