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Alan G. Sanfey, George Loewenstein, Samuel M. McClure & Jonathan D. Cohen (2006). Neuroeconomics: Cross-Currents in Research on Decision-Making.

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  1.  6
    The Influence of Emotion on Fairness-Related Decision Making: A Critical Review of Theories and Evidence.Ya Zheng, Zhong Yang, Chunlan Jin, Yue Qi & Xun Liu - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  2.  95
    Model-Based Theorizing in Cognitive Neuroscience.Elizabeth Irvine - 2016 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 67 (1):143-168.
    Weisberg and Godfrey-Smith distinguish between two forms of theorizing: data-driven ‘abstract direct representation’ and modelling. The key difference is that when using a data-driven approach, theories are intended to represent specific phenomena and so directly represent them, while models may not be intended to represent anything and so represent targets indirectly, if at all. The aim here is to compare and analyse these practices, in order to outline an account of model-based theorizing that involves direct representational relationships. This is based (...)
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  3. How is Willpower Possible? The Puzzle of Synchronic Self‐Control and the Divided Mind.Chandra Sekhar Sripada - 2014 - Noûs 48 (1):41-74.
  4.  8
    Neural Activity in Relation to Temporal Distance: Differences in Past and Future Temporal Discounting.J. M. He, X. T. Huang, H. Yuan & Y. G. Chen - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (4):1662-1672.
    This study investigated the differences between past and future temporal discounting in terms of neural activity in relation to temporal distance. Results show that brain regions are engaged differently in past and future temporal discounting. This is likely because past temporal discounting requires memory reconstruction, whereas future temporal discounting requires the processing of uncertainty about the future. In past temporal discounting, neural activity differed only when preferences were made between rewards received one hour prior and rewards received further in the (...)
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  5.  42
    What's on Your Mind? A Brain Scan Won't Tell.Yakir Levin & Itzhak Aharon - 2011 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (4):699-722.
    Reverse Inference ( RI ) is an imaging-based type of inference from brain states to mental states, which has become highly widespread in neuroscience, most especially in neuroeconomics. Recent critical studies of RI may be taken to show that, if cautiously used, RI can help achieve research goals that may be difficult to achieve by way of behavior-based procedures alone. But can RI exceed the limits of these procedures and achieve research goals that are impossible for them to achieve alone? (...)
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  6.  82
    Minds, Brains, and Norms.Dennis Patterson - 2011 - Neuroethics 4 (3):179-190.
    Arguments for the importance of neuroscience reach across many disciplines. Advocates of neuroscience have made wide-ranging claims for neuroscience in the realms of ethics, value, and law. In law, for example, many scholars have argued for an increased role for neuroscientific evidence in the assessment of criminal responsibility. In this article, we take up claims for the explanatory role of neuroscience in matters of morals and law. Drawing on our previous work together, we assess the cogency of neuroscientific explanations of (...)
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  7. Do Neurobiological Data Help Us to Understand Economic Decisions Better?Alessandro Antonietti - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (2):207-218.
    The contribution that neurobiological data provide us to comprehend the psychological aspects of economic decision-making is critically examined. First, different kinds of correspondences between neural events and mental activities are identified. On the basis of the distinctions made, some recent studies are selected, each of which focuses on a different stage of decision-making and employs a different set of neurobiological data. The thorough analysis of each study suggests that neuro-mental correspondences do not have an evidentiary function but rather a heuristic (...)
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  8.  59
    Is Neuroeconomics Doomed by the Reverse Inference Fallacy?Sacha Bourgeois-Gironde - 2010 - Mind and Society 9 (2):229-249.
    Neuroeconomic studies are liable to fall into the reverse inference fallacy, a form of affirmation of the consequent. More generally neuroeconomics relies on two problematic steps, namely the inference from brain activities to the engagement of cognitive processes in experimental tasks, and the presupposition that such inferred cognitive processes are relevant to economic theorizing. The first step only constitutes the reverse inference fallacy proper and ways to correct it include a better sense of the neural response selectivity of the targeted (...)
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  9. Philosophical Issues in Neuroimaging.Colin Klein - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (2):186-198.
    Functional neuroimaging (NI) technologies like Positron Emission Tomography and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) have revolutionized neuroscience, and provide crucial tools to link cognitive psychology and traditional neuroscientific models. A growing discipline of 'neurophilosophy' brings fMRI evidence to bear on traditional philosophical issues such as weakness of will, moral psychology, rational choice, social interaction, free will, and consciousness. NI has also attracted critical attention from psychologists and from philosophers of science. I review debates over the evidential status of fMRI, including (...)
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  10.  13
    When Economics Meets Neuroscience: Hype and Hope.Uskali Mäki - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (2):107-117.
    This is a paper on interdisciplinarity and rhetoric. Neuroeconomics is hype, but this does not rule out entertaining hopes about its capacity to produce some desirable consequences. Its "disciplinary conventions" are characterized as those of a young interdisciplinary field. Its rhetorical advantages are identified, and its rhetorical excesses are put in perspective and conditionally excused. Its evidential roles are emphasized, and they are shown to be limited in alleviating the under-constraint issue due to the difficulty of using fMRI properly.
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  11. Philosophical Questions About the Nature of Willpower.Chandra Sekhar Sripada - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (9):793–805.
    In this article, I survey four key questions about willpower: How is willpower possible? Why does willpower fail? How does willpower relate to other self-regulatory processes? and What are the connections between willpower and weakness of will? Empirical research into willpower is growing rapidly and yielding some fascinating new findings. This survey emphasizes areas in which empirical progress in understanding willpower helps to advance traditional philosophical debates.
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  12.  14
    On the Surprising Finding That Expected Utility is Literally Computed in the Brain.Jack Vromen - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (1):17-36.
    Advocates of neuroeconomics sometimes argue that one of the most surprising findings in neuroeconomic studies is that expected utilities are literally computed in the brain. This claim is scrutinized closely in the paper. Not surprisingly, the tenability of the claim is shown to depend critically on what is meant by ?literal computation? and ?surprising?. It is argued that the findings do not show that expected utilities are literally computed, if by ?literal computation? we mean a particular kind of mental activity (...)
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  13.  30
    A Descriptive Multi-Attribute Utility Model for Everyday Decisions.Jie W. Weiss, David J. Weiss & Ward Edwards - 2010 - Theory and Decision 68 (1-2):101-114.
    We propose a descriptive version of the classical multi-attribute utility model; to that end, we add a new parameter, momentary salience, to the customary formulation. The addition of this parameter allows the theory to accommodate changes in the decision maker’s mood and circumstances, as the saliencies of anticipated consequences are driven by concerns of the moment. By allowing for the number of consequences given attention at the moment of decision to vary, the new model mutes the criticism that SEU models (...)
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  14.  23
    Special Issue on “Cognition and Emotion in Economic Decision Making”.Nicolao Bonini, Rob Ranyard & Luigi Mittone - 2009 - Mind and Society 8 (1):1-6.
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  15.  36
    Expectations and Social Decision-Making: Biasing Effects of Prior Knowledge on Ultimatum Responses. [REVIEW]Alan G. Sanfey - 2009 - Mind and Society 8 (1):93-107.
    Psychological studies have long demonstrated effects of expectations on judgment, whereby the provision of information, either implicitly or explicitly, prior to an experience or decision can exert a substantial influence on the observed behavior. This study extended these expectation effects to the domain of interactive economic decision-making. Prior to playing a commonly-used bargaining task, the Ultimatum Game, participants were primed to expect offers that would be either relatively fair or unfair. A third group played the Game without receiving any prior (...)
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  16.  19
    A Unified Framework for Addiction: Vulnerabilities in the Decision Process.Adam Johnson A. David Redish, Steve Jensen - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):415.
    The understanding of decision-making systems has come together in recent years to form a unified theory of decision-making in the mammalian brain as arising from multiple, interacting systems (a planning system, a habit system, and a situation-recognition system). This unified decision-making system has multiple potential access points through which it can be driven to make maladaptive choices, particularly choices that entail seeking of certain drugs or behaviors. We identify 10 key vulnerabilities in the system: (1) moving away from homeostasis, (2) (...)
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  17.  37
    How Actions Create – Not Just Reveal – Preferences.Dan Ariely & Michael I. Norton - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):13-16.
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  18.  81
    The Role of Social Cognition in Emotion.Andreas Olsson & Kevin N. Ochsner - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):65-71.
  19.  39
    A Unified Framework for Addiction: Vulnerabilities in the Decision Process.A. David Redish, Steve Jensen & Adam Johnson - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):415-437.
    The understanding of decision-making systems has come together in recent years to form a unified theory of decision-making in the mammalian brain as arising from multiple, interacting systems (a planning system, a habit system, and a situation-recognition system). This unified decision-making system has multiple potential access points through which it can be driven to make maladaptive choices, particularly choices that entail seeking of certain drugs or behaviors. We identify 10 key vulnerabilities in the system: (1) moving away from homeostasis, (2) (...)
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  20.  47
    Brain, Emotion and Decision Making: The Paradigmatic Example of Regret.Giorgio Coricelli, Raymond J. Dolan & Angela Sirigu - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (6):258-265.
  21.  81
    Social Neuroeconomics: The Neural Circuitry of Social Preferences.Ernst Fehr & Colin F. Camerer - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (10):419-427.
  22.  19
    Base-Rate Respect Meets Affect Neglect.Paul Whitney, John M. Hinson & Allison L. Matthews - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):285-286.
    While improving the theoretical account of base-rate neglect, Barbey & Sloman's (B&S's) target article suffers from affect neglect by failing to consider the fundamental role of emotional processes in decisions. We illustrate how affective influences are fundamental to decision making, and discuss how the dual process model can be a useful framework for understanding hot and cold cognition in reasoning.
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