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  1. Knowing Me, Knowing You: Emotion Differentiation in Oneself is Associated with Recognition of Others’ Emotions.Jacob Israelashvili, Suzanne Oosterwijk, Disa Sauter & Agneta Fischer - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (7):1461-1471.
    ABSTRACTPrevious research has found that individuals vary greatly in emotion differentiation, that is, the extent to which they distinguish between different emotions when reporting on their own fe...
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  • fNIRS Evidence for Recognizably Different Positive Emotions.Xin Hu, Chu Zhuang, Fei Wang, Yong-Jin Liu, Chang-Hwan Im & Dan Zhang - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  • Jumping for Joy: The Importance of the Body and of Dynamics in the Expression and Recognition of Positive Emotions.Marcello Mortillaro & Daniel Dukes - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • The Affective Core of Emotion: Linking Pleasure, Subjective Well-Being, and Optimal Metastability in the Brain.Morten L. Kringelbach & Kent C. Berridge - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (3):191-199.
    Arguably, emotion is always valenced—either pleasant or unpleasant—and dependent on the pleasure system. This system serves adaptive evolutionary functions; relying on separable wanting, liking, and learning neural mechanisms mediated by mesocorticolimbic networks driving pleasure cycles with appetitive, consummatory, and satiation phases. Liking is generated in a small set of discrete hedonic hotspots and coldspots, while wanting is linked to dopamine and to larger distributed brain networks. Breakdown of the pleasure system can lead to anhedonia and other features of affective disorders. (...)
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  • Comment: Frameworks for Theory and Research on Positive Emotions.Ira J. Roseman - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (3):238-244.
    Contributions to this special section on positive emotions are summarized and integrated within a framework for organizing theory and research on particular emotions. Emotions are conceptualized as evolved strategies for coping with crises and opportunities, elicited by situational and appraisal antecedents–with phenomenological, physiological, expressive, behavioral, and emotivational goal components. Within this framework, theories are compared, inconsistencies and gaps in knowledge are identified, and issues in emotion theory are discussed.
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  • Self-Transcendent Emotions and Their Social Functions: Compassion, Gratitude, and Awe Bind Us to Others Through Prosociality.Jennifer E. Stellar, Amie M. Gordon, Paul K. Piff, Daniel Cordaro, Craig L. Anderson, Yang Bai, Laura A. Maruskin & Dacher Keltner - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (3):200-207.
    In this article we review the emerging literature on the self-transcendent emotions. We discuss how the self-transcendent emotions differ from other positive emotions and outline the defining features of this category. We then provide an analysis of three specific self-transcendent emotions—compassion, gratitude, and awe—detailing what has been learned about their expressive behavior, physiology, and likely evolutionary origins. We propose that these emotions emerged to help humans solve unique problems related to caretaking, cooperation, and group coordination in social interactions. In our (...)
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  • Understudied Negative Emotions: What They Can Tell Us About the Nature of Emotions.Christine R. Harris - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (4):269-271.
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  • Comment: The Science of Positive Emotion: You’Ve Come a Long Way, Baby/There’s Still a Long Way to Go.Michelle N. Shiota - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (3):235-237.
    After decades of neglect, positive emotion is now the focus of a rich, diverse, and rapidly growing field. Basic research has advanced understanding of positive emotions’ neural mechanisms, nonverbal expression, and implications for cognition and motivation, with increasing appreciation of positive emotion differentiation, as well as cultural and contextual moderators of positive emotions’ effects. Much research has also addressed ways positive emotions can be leveraged to improve the human condition, and the mechanisms by which interventions have beneficial effects. As always, (...)
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  • Science Is Awe-Some: The Emotional Antecedents of Science Learning.Piercarlo Valdesolo, Andrew Shtulman & Andrew S. Baron - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (3):215-221.
    Scientists from Einstein to Sagan have linked emotions like awe with the motivation for scientific inquiry, but no research has tested this possibility. Theoretical and empirical work from affective science, however, suggests that awe might be unique in motivating explanation and exploration of the physical world. We synthesize theories of awe with theories of the cognitive mechanisms related to learning, and offer a generative theoretical framework that can be used to test the effect of this emotion on early science learning.
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