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  1. Increasing Use of DNR Orders in the Elderly Worldwide: Whose Choice is It?E. P. Cherniack - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):303-307.
    Most elderly patients die with an order in place that they not be given cardiopulmonary resuscitation . Surveys have shown that many elderly in different parts of the world want to be resuscitated, but may lack knowledge about the specifics of cardiopulmonary resuscitation . Data from countries other than the US is limited, but differences in physician and patient opinions by nationality regarding CPR do exist. Physicians’ own preferences for CPR may predominate in the DNR decision making process for their (...)
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  • Code Status Discussions and Goals of Care Among Hospitalised Adults.L. C. Kaldjian, Z. D. Erekson, T. H. Haberle, A. E. Curtis, L. A. Shinkunas, K. T. Cannon & V. L. Forman-Hoffman - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):338-342.
    Background and objective: Code status discussions may fail to address patients’ treatment-related goals and their knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This study aimed to investigate patients’ resuscitation preferences, knowledge of CPR and goals of care. Design, setting, patients and measurements: 135 adults were interviewed within 48 h of admission to a general medical service in an academic medical centre, querying code status preferences, knowledge about CPR and its outcome probabilities and goals of care. Medical records were reviewed for clinical information (...)
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  • The Substituted Judgment Standard. Studies on the Ethics of Surrogate Decision Making.Linus Broström - unknown
    Patients who are incompetent need a surrogate decision maker to make treatment decisons on their behalf. One of the main ethical questions that arise in this context is what standard ought to govern such decision making. According to the Substituted Judgment Standard, a surrogate ought to make the decision that the patient would have made, had he or she been competent. Although this standard has sometimes been criticized on the grounds of being difficult to apply, it has found wide appeal, (...)
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  • Talking About Tubes : Attitudes of Health Care Professionals.Gail Frances Poole - unknown
    Many individuals with chronic or degenerative diseases in Canada are in receipt of long-term artificial nutrition and hydration. Once an individual has been transferred to a chronic care facility, is the feeding tube viewed as a medical treatment, and subject to the same evaluations and discussions as other medical treatments, or does the feeding tube become an unquestioned permanent part of the life of the resident? How do clinicians who care for these residents view the ethical issues involved in long-term (...)
     
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  • Turning Failures Into Successes: A Methodological Shortcoming in Empirical Research on Surrogate Accuracy.Mats Johansson & Linus Broström - 2008 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (1):17-26.
    Decision making for incompetent patients is a much-discussed topic in bioethics. According to one influential decision making standard, the substituted judgment standard, a surrogate decision maker ought to make the decision that the incompetent patient would have made, had he or she been competent. Empirical research has been conducted in order to find out whether surrogate decision makers are sufficiently good at doing their job, as this is defined by the substituted judgment standard. This research investigates to what extent surrogates (...)
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  • Should Healthcare Institutions Have at Least One Medically Indigent Member on the Institution's HEC? Yes.Kathryn L. Moseley - 1995 - HEC Forum 7 (6):370-373.
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  • Ethical Issues in Patients with Leukemia: Practice Points and Educational Topics for the Clinical Oncologist and Trainees.Jeffery S. Farroni, Phillp A. Thompson, Daud Arif, Jorge E. Cortes & Colleen M. Gallagher - 2017 - Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 8 (5).
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  • Do Physicians' Own Preferences for Life-Sustaining Treatment Influence Their Perceptions of Patients' Preferences? A Second Look.Lawrence J. Schneiderman, Robert M. Kaplan, Esther Rosenberg & Holly Teetzel - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (2):131-.
    Previous studies have documented the fallibility of attempts by surrogates and physicians to act in a substituted judgment capacity and predict end-of-life treatment decisions on behalf of patients. We previously reported that physicians misperceive their patients' preferences and substitute their own preferences for those of their patients with respect to four treatments: cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the event of cardiac arrest, ventilator for an indefinite period of time, medical nutrition and hydration for an indefinite period of time, and hospitalization in the (...)
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