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  1. Alchemy, Magic and Moralism in the Thought of Robert Boyle.Michael Hunter - 1990 - British Journal for the History of Science 23 (4):387-410.
    At some point during the last two years of his life, Robert Boyle dictated to his friend, Gilbert Burnet, Bishop of Salisbury, some notes on major events and themes in his career. Some of the information he divulged in these memoranda has become quite widely known because Burnet used it in the funeral sermon for Boyle that he delivered a month after his death, at St Martin's in the Fields on 7 January 1692. In addition, these notes were cited several (...)
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  • Philosophy and Memory Traces: Descartes to Connectionism.John Sutton - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophy and Memory Traces defends two theories of autobiographical memory. One is a bewildering historical view of memories as dynamic patterns in fleeting animal spirits, nervous fluids which rummaged through the pores of brain and body. The other is new connectionism, in which memories are 'stored' only superpositionally, and reconstructed rather than reproduced. Both models, argues John Sutton, depart from static archival metaphors by employing distributed representation, which brings interference and confusion between memory traces. Both raise urgent issues about control (...)
  • The 'Physical Prophet' and the Powers of the Imagination. Part I: A Case-Study on Prophecy, Vapours and the Imagination (1685–1710). [REVIEW]Koen Vermeir - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 35 (4):561-591.
    I argue that the imagination was a crucial concept for the understanding of marvellous phenomena, divination and magic in general. Exploring a debate on prophecy at the turn of the seventeenth century, I show that four explanatory categories were consistently evoked and I elucidate the role of the imagination in each of them. I introduce the term ‘floating concept’ to conceptualise the different ways in which the imagination and the related ‘animal spirits’ were understood in diverse discourses. My argument is (...)
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  • Locke's Ideology of ‘Common Sense’.Michael Ben-Chaim - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 31 (3):473-501.
    Recent studies of the social and political meanings of English science in the 17th century have often included only a cursory inspection of Locke's work. Conversely, detailed studies of Locke's theory of knowledge have tended to refrain from taking into serious consideration the social context of English science in that period. The paper explores the contribution of Locke's conception of experience to the rise of experimental philosophy as a new social force. It shows that Locke elaborated a doctrine that rendered (...)
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  • Mechanical and “Organical” Models in Seventeenth-Century Explanations of Biological Reproduction.Daniel C. Fouke - 1989 - Science in Context 3 (2):365-381.
  • Graphic Understanding: Instruments and Interpretation in Robert Hooke's Micrographia.Michael Aaron Dennis - 1989 - Science in Context 3 (2):309-364.
  • “The Mind Is Its Own Place”: Science and Solitude in Seventeenth-Century England.Steven Shapin - 1991 - Science in Context 4 (1):191-218.
  • De-Centring the ‘Big Picture’: The Origins of Modern Science and the Modern Origins of Science.Andrew Cunningham & Perry Williams - 1993 - British Journal for the History of Science 26 (4):407-432.
    Like it or not, a big picture of the history of science is something which we cannot avoid. Big pictures are, of course, thoroughly out of fashion at the moment; those committed to specialist research find them simplistic and insufficiently complex and nuanced, while postmodernists regard them as simply impossible. But however specialist we may be in our research, however scornful of the immaturity of grand narratives, it is not so easy to escape from dependence – acknowledged or not – (...)
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  • ‘A Treasure of Hidden Vertues’: The Attraction of Magnetic Marketing.Patricia Fara - 1995 - British Journal for the History of Science 28 (1):5-35.
    When customers like Samuel Pepys visited the shop of Thomas Tuttell, instrument maker to the king, they could purchase a pack of mathematical playing-cards. The seven of spades, reproduced as Figure 1, depicted the diverse connotations of magnets, or loadstones. These cards cost a shilling, and were too expensive for many of the surveyors, navigators and other practitioners shown using Tuttell's instruments. They provide an early example of the products promising both diversion and improvement which were increasingly marketed to polite (...)
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  • The Natural History Files.Palmira Fontes da Costa - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (3):583-587.
  • The Natural History Files.Palmira Fontes da Costa - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 32 (3):583-587.
  • Drebbel's Living Instruments, Hartmann's Microcosm, and Libavius's Thelesmos: Epistemic Machines Before Descartes.Vera Keller - 2010 - History of Science 48 (1):39.
  • Mechanism and Activity in the Scientific Revolution: The Case of Robert Hooke.Mark E. Ehrlich - 1995 - Annals of Science 52 (2):127-151.
    Recent ‘revisionist’ studies of the Scientific Revolution have utilized Robert Hooke as an example of a mechanical philosopher who incorporated active principles in his world system. This paper carefully examines Hooke's natural philosophy in order to determine the extent to which he employed active agents in his work. Thorough investigation reveals that although Hooke sometimes refrained from offering causal explanations of the phenomena he studied, there is no solid evidence that he believed active principles were at work in nature. Rather, (...)
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  • Stars, Spirits, Signs: Towards a History of Astrology 1100–1800.Lauren Kassell - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (2):67-69.
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  • Boyle on Seminal Principles.Peter R. Anstey - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 33 (4):597-630.
    This paper presents a comprehensive study of Robert Boyle’s writings on seminal principles or seeds. It examines the role of seeds in Boyle’s account of creation, the generation of plants and animals, spontaneous generation, the generation of minerals and disease. By an examination of all of Boyle’s major extant discussions of seeds it is argued that there were discernible changes in Boyle’s views over time. As the years progressed Boyle became more sceptical about the role of seminal principles in the (...)
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  • The ‘Physical Prophet’ and the Powers of the Imagination. Part I: A Case-Study on Prophecy, Vapours and the Imagination.Koen Vermeir - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (4):561-591.
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