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  1. CSR and the Debate on Business and Human Rights: Bridging the Great Divide.Florian Wettstein - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (4):739-770.
    Human rights have not played an overwhelmingly prominent role in CSR in the past. Similarly, CSR has had relatively little influence on what is now called the “business and human rights debate.” This contribution uncovers some of the reasons for the rather peculiar disconnect between these two debates and, based on it, presents some apparent synergies and complementarities between the two. A closer integration of the two debates, as it argues, would allow for the formulation of an expansive and demanding (...)
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  • Silence as Complicity: Elements of a Corporate Duty to Speak Out Against the Violation of Human Rights.Florian Wettstein - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (1):37-61.
    Increasingly, global businesses are confronted with the question of complicity in human rights violations committed by abusive host governments. This contribution specifically looks at silent complicity and the way it challenges conventional interpretations of corporate responsibility. Silent complicity impliesthat corporations have moral obligations that reach beyond the negative realm of doing no harm. Essentially, it implies that corporations have a moral responsibility to help protect human rights by putting pressure on perpetrating host governments involved in human rights abuses. This is (...)
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  • Introduction to the Special Issue: Globalization as a Challenge for Business Responsibilities.Andreas Georg Scherer, Guido Palazzo & Dirk Matten - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):327-347.
    This article assesses some of the implications of globalization for the scholarly debate on business ethics, CSR and related concepts. The argument is based, among other things, on the declining capacity of nation state institutions to regulate socially desirable corporate behavior as well as the growing corporate exposure to heterogeneous social, cultural and political values in societies globally. It is argued that these changes are shifting the corporate role towards a sphere of societal governance hitherto dominated by traditional political actors. (...)
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  • Post-Westphalia and Its Discontents: Business, Globalization, and Human Rights in Political and Moral Perspective.Michael A. Santoro - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):285-297.
    This article examines the presuppositions and theoretical frameworks of the “new-wave” “Post-Westphalian” approach to international business ethics and compares it to the more philosophically oriented moral theory approach that has predominated in the field. I contrast one author’s Post-Westphalian political approach to the human rights responsibilities of transnational corporations with my own “Fair Share” theory of moral responsibility for human rights. I suggest how the debate about the meaning of corporate human rights “complicity” might be informed by the fair share (...)
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  • Institutional Logics in the Study of Organizations: The Social Construction of the Relationship Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance.Marc Orlitzky - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (3):409-444.
    This study examines whether the empirical evidence on the relationship between corporate social performance and corporate financial performance differs depending on the publication outlet in which that evidence appears. This moderator meta-analysis, based on a total sample size of 33,878 observations, suggests that published CSP-CFP findings have been shaped by differences in institutional logics in different subdisciplines of organization studies. In economics, finance, and accounting journals, the average correlations were only about half the magnitude of the findings published in Social (...)
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  • Extant Social Contracts in Global Business Regulation: Outline of a Research Agenda.J. Oosterhout & Pursey Heugens - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S4):729-740.
    The notion of extant social contracts (ESC), which was the original contribution that Tom Dunfee provided to contractualist business ethics (CBE) and Integrated Social Contracts Theory (ISCT) more specifically, has commanded less research attention to date than one would expect based on its apparent empirical face validity and its disciplinary spanning potential. This article attempts to revive the ESC concept in both normative and positive research at the intersection of business, management, and ethics and law. After identifying three features that (...)
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  • Advancing the Business and Human Rights Agenda: Dialogue, Empowerment, and Constructive Engagement.Sébastien Mena, Marieke de Leede, Dorothée Baumann, Nicky Black, Sara Lindeman & Lindsay McShane - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1):161 - 188.
    As corporations are going global, they are increasingly confronted with human rights challenges. As such, new ways to deal with human rights challenges in corporate operations must be developed as traditional governance mechanisms are not always able to tackle them. This article presents five different views on innovative solutions for the relationships between business and human rights that all build on empowerment, dialogue and constructive engagement. The different approaches highlight an emerging trend toward a more active role for corporations in (...)
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  • CSR, Transparency and the Role of Intermediate Organisations.Wim Dubbink, Johan Graafland & Luc van Liedekerke - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):391 - 406.
    Transparency is a crucial condition to implement a CSR policy based on the reputation mechanism. The central question of this contribution is how a transparency policy ought to be organised in order to enhance the CSR behaviour of companies. Governments endorsing CSR as a new means of governance have different strategies to foster CSR transparency. In this paper we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of two conventional policy strategies: the facilitation policy and the command and control strategy. Using three criteria (...)
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  • Positive Economics and the Normativistic Fallacy: Bridging the Two Sides of CSR.Philipp Schreck, Dominik van Aaken & Thomas Donaldson - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (2):297-329.
    In response to criticism of empirical or “positive” approaches to corporate social responsibility, we defend the importance of these approaches for any CSR theory that seeks to have practical impact. Although we acknowledge limitations to positive approaches, we unpack the neglected but crucial relationships between positive knowledge on the one hand and normative knowledge on the other in the implementation of CSR principles. Using the structure of a practical syllogism, we construct a model that displays the key role of empirical (...)
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  • The Role of Corporations in Shaping the Global Rules of the Game: In Search of New Foundations.J. Van Oosterhout - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):253-264.
    Although a research focus on the increasing involvement of corporations in shaping and maintaining the global rules of the game points out promising avenues for future research, it simultaneously makes clear how little currently established, mostly managerialconceptual frameworks have to offer in making sense of these developments. It is argued that we need to expand the rather restricted perspectives that these frameworks provide, in order to explore new conceptual foundations that will not only enable us to travel theconfines of the (...)
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  • Conflicts of Interest in Financial Intermediation.Guido Palazzo & Lena Rethel - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):193-207.
    The last years have seen a surge of scandals in financial intermediation. This article argues that the agency structure inherent to most forms of financial intermediation gives rise to conflicts of interest. Though this does not excuse scandalous behavior it points out market imperfections. There are four types of conflicts of interest: personal-individual, personal-organizational, impersonal-individual, and finally, impersonal-organizational conflicts. Analyzing recent scandals we find that all four types of conflicts of interest prevail in financial intermediation.
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  • Seeking Legitimacy Through CSR: Institutional Pressures and Corporate Responses of Multinationals in Sri Lanka.Eshani Beddewela & Jenny Fairbrass - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (3):503-522.
    Arguably, the corporate social responsibility practices of multinational enterprises are influenced by a wide range of both internal and external factors. Perhaps, most critical among the exogenous forces operating on MNEs are those exerted by state and other key institutional actors in host countries. Crucially, academic research conducted to date offers little data about how MNEs use their CSR activities to strategically manage their relationship with those actors in order to gain legitimisation advantages in host countries. This paper addresses that (...)
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  • The Enduring Potential of Justified Hypernorms.Markus Scholz, Gastón de los Reyes & N. Craig Smith - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (3):317-342.
    ABSTRACT:The profound influence of Thomas Donaldson and Thomas Dunfee’s integrative social contracts theory on the field of business ethics has been challenged by Andreas Scherer and Guido Palazzo’s Habermasian approach, which has achieved prominence of late with articles that expressly question the defensibility of ISCT’s hypernorms. This article builds on recent efforts by Donaldson and Scherer to bridge their accounts by providing discursive foundations to the hypernorms at the heart of the ISCT framework. Extending prior literature, we propose an ISCT* (...)
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  • Can Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives Improve Global Supply Chains? Improving Deliberative Capacity with a Stakeholder Orientation.Vivek Soundararajan, Jill A. Brown & Andrew C. Wicks - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (3):385-412.
    ABSTRACT:Global multi-stakeholder initiatives are important instruments that have the potential to improve the social and environmental sustainability of global supply chains. However, they often fail to comprehensively address the needs and interests of various supply-chain participants. While voluntary in nature, MSIs have most often been implemented through coercive approaches, resulting in friction among their participants and in systemic problems with decoupling. Additionally, in those cases in which deliberation was constrained between and amongst participants, collaborative approaches have often failed to materialize. (...)
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  • Responsible Leadership in Global Business: A New Approach to Leadership and Its Multi-Level Outcomes. [REVIEW]Christian Voegtlin, Moritz Patzer & Andreas Georg Scherer - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):1-16.
    The article advances an understanding of responsible leadership in global business and offers an agenda for future research in this field. Our conceptualization of responsible leadership draws on deliberative practices and discursive conflict resolution, combining the macro-view of the business firm as a political actor with the micro-view of leadership. We discuss the concept in relation to existing research in leadership. Further, we propose a new model of responsible leadership that shows how such an understanding of leadership can address the (...)
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  • Corporations and NGOs: When Accountability Leads to Co-Optation. [REVIEW]Dorothea Baur & Hans Peter Schmitz - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (1):9-21.
    Interactions between corporations and nonprofits are on the rise, frequently driven by a corporate interest in establishing credentials for corporate social responsibility (CSR). In this article, we show how increasing demands for accountability directed at both businesses and NGOs can have the unintended effect of compromising the autonomy of nonprofits and fostering their co-optation. Greater scrutiny of NGO spending driven by self-appointed watchdogs of the nonprofit sector and a prevalence of strategic notions of CSR advanced by corporate actors weaken the (...)
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  • Development of a Scale Measuring Discursive Responsible Leadership.Christian Voegtlin - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (S1):57-73.
    The paper advances the conceptual understanding of responsible leadership and develops an empirical scale of discursive responsible leadership. The concept of responsible leadership presented here draws on deliberative practices and discursive conflict resolution, combining the macro-view of the business firm as a political actor with the micro-view of leadership. Ideal responsible leadership conduct thereby goes beyond the dyadic leader–follower interaction to include all stakeholders. The paper offers a definition and operationalization of responsible leadership. The studies that have been conducted to (...)
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  • Corporate Governance in a Risk Society.Anselm Schneider & Andreas Georg Scherer - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (2):1-15.
    Under conditions of growing interconnectedness of the global economy, more and more stakeholders are exposed to risks and costs resulting from business activities that are neither regulated nor compensated for by means of national governance. The changing distribution of risks poses a threat to the legitimacy of business firms that normally derive their legitimacy from operating in compliance with the legal rules of democratic nation states. However, during the process of globalization, the regulatory power of nation states has been weakened (...)
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  • Organizing Corporate Social Responsibility in Small and Large Firms: Size Matters. [REVIEW]Dorothée Baumann-Pauly, Christopher Wickert, Laura J. Spence & Andreas Georg Scherer - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):693-705.
    Based on the findings of a qualitative empirical study of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Swiss MNCs and SMEs, we suggest that smaller firms are not necessarily less advanced in organizing CSR than large firms. Results according to theoretically derived assessment frameworks illustrate the actual implementation status of CSR in organizational practices. We propose that small firms possess several organizational characteristics that are favorable for promoting the internal implementation of CSR-related practices in core business functions, but constrain external communication and (...)
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  • Trade Associations and Corporate Social Responsibility: Evidence From the UK Water and Film Industries.Anja Schaefer & Finola Kerrigan - 2008 - Business Ethics 17 (2):171–195.
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  • The Organizational Implementation of Corporate Citizenship: An Assessment Tool and its Application at UN Global Compact Participants. [REVIEW]Dorothée Baumann-Pauly & Andreas Georg Scherer - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):1-17.
    The corporate citizenship (CC) concept introduced by Dirk Matten and Andrew Crane has been well received. To this date, however, empirical studies based on this concept are lacking. In this article, we flesh out and operationalize the CC concept and develop an assessment tool for CC. Our tool focuses on the organizational level and assesses the embeddedness of CC in organizational structures and procedures. To illustrate the applicability of the tool, we assess five Swiss companies (ABB, Credit Suisse, Nestlé, Novartis, (...)
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  • Corporate Citizenship in Developing Countries: Conceptualisations of Human-Rights-Based Evaluative Benchmarks.Rudiger Hahn - 2012 - African Journal of Business Ethics 6 (1):30.
    This article builds upon on Crane, Matten and Moon's extended view of corporate citizenship to discuss the actual and potential role of private business with regard to specific human rights in developing countries. A set of analytical benchmarks will be proposed to assess corporate behaviour with regard to these rights. A number of empirical cases illustrate the applicability and constraints of these benchmarks and help to enhance corporate citizenship thinking and theory.
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  • Input and Output Legitimacy of Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives.Sébastien Mena & Guido Palazzo - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (3):527-556.
    In a globalizing world, governments are not always able or willing to regulate the social and environmental externalities of global business activities. Multi-stakeholder initiatives, defined as global institutions involving mainly corporations and civil society organizations, are one type of regulatory mechanism that tries to fill this gap by issuing soft law regulation. This conceptual paper examines the conditions of a legitimate transfer of regulatory power from traditional democratic nation-state processes to private regulatory schemes, such as MSIs. Democratic legitimacy is typically (...)
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  • Moral Commitments and the Societal Role of Business: An Ordonomic Approach to Corporate Citizenship.Ingo Pies, Stefan Hielscher & Markus Beckmann - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):375-401.
    This article introduces an “ordonomic” approach to corporate citizenship. We believe that ordonomics offers a conceptual framework for analyzing both the social structure and the semantics of moral commitments. We claim that such an analysis can provide theoretical guidance for the changing role of business in society, especially in regard to the expectation and trend that businesses take a political role and act as corporate citizens. The systematic raison d’être of corporate citizenship is that business firms can and—judged by the (...)
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  • Regulation of Sharing Economy Platforms Through Partial Meta-Organizing.Heloise Berkowitz & Antoine Souchaud - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-16.
    Can platforms close the governance gap in the sharing economy, and if so, how? Through an in-depth qualitative case study, we analyze the process by which new regulation and self-regulation emerge in one sector of the sharing economy, crowdfunding, through the actions of a meta-organization. We focus on the principal French sectoral meta-organization, Financement Participatif France. We show that this multi-stakeholder meta-organization not only closed the governance gap through collective legal, ethical, and utilitarian work but also preceded and shaped the (...)
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  • Private Security Companies and Institutional Legitimacy: Corporate and Stakeholder Responsibility.Heather Elms & Robert A. Phillips - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):403-432.
    The private provision of security services has attracted a great deal of recent attention, both professional and popular. Much of that attention suggests the questioned moral legitimacy of the private vs. public provision of security. Linking the literature on moral legitimacy and responsibility from new institutional and stakeholder theories, we examine the relationship between moral legitimacy and responsible behavior by both private security companies and their stakeholders. We ask what the moral-legitimacy-enhancing responsibilities of both might be, and contribute to both (...)
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  • Corporations as Political Actors – A Report on the First Swiss Master Class in Corporate Social Responsibility.Andreas Rasche, Dorothea Baur, Mariëtte Huijstee, Stephen Ladek, Jayanthi Naidu & Cecilia Perla - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):151-173.
    This paper presents a report on the first Swiss Master Class in Corporate Social Responsibility, which was held between the 8th and 9th December 2006 at HEC Lausanne in Switzerland. The first section of the report introduces the topic of the master class - 'Corporations as Political Actors - Facing the Postnational Challenge' - as well as the concept of the master class. The second section gives an overview of papers written by nine young scholars that were selected to present (...)
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  • In Defense of a Regulated Market Economy.Jukka Mäkinen & Eero Kasanen - 2015 - Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):99-109.
    The dominant understanding of political corporate social responsibility suggests new, broader political roles for businesses in the globalized economy, challenging the classical liberal social order. In this paper, we show how the major framing of the political CSR discussion not only challenges the classical liberal social order but also goes against the more general political economic perspective of the regulated market economy. We argue that this latter tendency of the political CSR discussion is its main weakness. We introduce a Rawlsian (...)
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  • On the Duties of Commission in Commercial Life. A Kantian Criticism of Moral Institutionalism.Wim Dubbink & Bert van de Ven - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (2):221 - 238.
    In latter-day discussions on corporate morality, duties of commission are fiercely debated. Moral institutionalists argue that duties of commission—such as a duty of assistance—overstep the boundaries of moral duty owed by economic agents. " Moral institutionalism" is a newly coined term for a familiar position on market morality. It maintains that market morality ought to be restricted, excluding all duties of commission. Neo-Classical thinkers such as Baumol and Homann defend it most eloquently. They underpin their position with concerns that go (...)
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  • Accountable to Whom? Rethinking the Role of Corporations in Political CSR.Waheed Hussain & Jeffrey Moriarty - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (3):519-534.
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  • Corporations as Political Actors – a Report on the First Swiss Master Class in Corporate Social Responsibility.Andreas Rasche, Dorothea Baur, Mariëtte van Huijstee, Stephen Ladek, Jayanthi Naidu, Cecilia Perla, Esther Schouten, Michael Valente & Mingrui Zhang - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):151 - 173.
    This paper presents a report on the first Swiss Master Class in Corporate Social Responsibility, which was held between the 8th and 9th December 2006 at HEC Lausanne in Switzerland. The first section of the report introduces the topic of the master class – ‚Corporations as Political Actors – Facing the Postnational Challenge’ – as well as the concept of the master class. The second section gives an overview of papers written by nine young scholars that were selected to present (...)
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  • Wage Exploitation and the Nonworseness Claim: Allowing the Wrong, To Do More Good.David Faraci - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (2):169-188.
    Many believe that employment can be wrongfully exploitative, even if it is consensual and mutually beneficial. At the same time, it may seem third parties should not do anything to preclude or eliminate such arrangements, given these same considerations of consent and benefit. I argue that there are perfectly sensible, intuitive ethical positions that vindicate this ‘Reasonable View’. The view requires such defense because the literature often suggests that there is no theoretical space for it. I respond to arguments for (...)
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  • For Better or For Worse: Corporate Responsibility Beyond “Do No Harm”.Florian Wettstein - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):275-283.
    Do corporations have a duty to promote just institutions? Agreeing with Hsieh’s recent contribution, this article argues that they do. However, contrary to Hsieh, it holds that such a claim cannot be advanced convincingly only by reference to the negative duty to do no harm. Instead, such a duty necessarily must be grounded in positive obligation. In the search of a foundation for a positive duty for corporations to further just institutions, Stephen Kobrin’s notion of “private political authority” offers a (...)
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  • Exploitation and Sweatshop Labor: Perspectives and Issues.Jeremy Snyder - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):187-213.
    In this review, I survey theoretical accounts of exploitation in business, chiefly through the example of low wage or sweatshop labor. This labor is associated with wages that fall below a living wage standard and include long working hours. Labor of this kind is often described as self-evidently exploitative and immoral (Van Natta 1995). But for those who defend sweatshop labor as the first rung on a ladder toward greater economic development, the charge that sweatshop labor is self-evidently exploitative fails (...)
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  • Talk Ain’T Cheap: Political CSR and the Challenges of Corporate Deliberation.Cameron Sabadoz & Abraham Singer - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (2):183-211.
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  • Is Competition Law an Impediment to CSR?Wim Dubbink & Frans Paul van der Putten - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):381 - 395.
    This paper provides an empirical case study of the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the new competition regulation in the Netherlands. The leading question in this case study is whether the new institutional arrangement has allowed for the possibility that reasonable exceptions can be made to the principle that inter-firm cooperation is prohibited. That is to say: does the new institutional arrangement allow for the possibility of 'well organized but not 'perfect' markets'? The investigation focuses on the Netherlands, (...)
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  • The Role of Precontractual Signals in Creating Sustainable Global Supply Chains.Robert C. Bird & Vivek Soundararajan - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-14.
    Global supply chains enhance value, but are subject to governance problems and encourage evasive practices that deter sustainability, especially in developing countries. This article proposes that the precontractual environment, where parties are interested in trade but have not yet negotiated formal terms, can enable a unique process for building long-term sustainable relations. We argue that precontractual signals based on relation-specific investments, promises of repeated exchange, and reassuring cheap talk can be leveraged in precontract by the power of framing. We show (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosures, Traditionalism and Politics: A Story From a Traditional Setting.Shahzad Uddin, Javed Siddiqui & Muhammad Azizul Islam - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (2):409-428.
    This paper demonstrates the political perspective of corporate social responsibility disclosures and, drawing on Weber’s notion of traditionalism, seeks to explain what motivates companies to make such disclosures in a traditional setting. Annual reports of 23 banking companies in Bangladesh are analysed over the period 2009–2012. This is supplemented by a review of documentary evidence on the political and social activities of corporations and reports published in national and international newspapers. We found that, in the banking companies over the period (...)
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  • Business and the Polis: What Does It Mean to See Corporations as Political Actors? [REVIEW]Pierre-Yves Néron - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (3):333-352.
    This article addresses the recent call in business ethics literature for a better understanding of corporations as political actors or entities. It first gives an overview of recent attempts to examine classical issues in business ethics through a political lens. It examines different ways in which theorists with an interest in the normative analysis of business practices and institutions could find it desirable and fruitful to use a political lens. This article presents a distinction among four views of the relations (...)
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  • Liberal Thought in Reasoning on CSR.Ulf Henning Richter - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (4):625 - 649.
    In this article, I argue that conventional reasoning on corporate social responsibility (CSR) is based on the assumption of a liberal market economy in the context of a nation state. I build on the study of Scherer and Palazzo (Acad Manage Rev 32(4):1096-1120, 2007), developing a number of criteria to identify elements of liberal philosophy in the ongoing CSR debate. I discuss their occurrence in the CSR literature in detail and reflect on the implications, taking into account the emerging political (...)
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  • Beyond Voluntariness, Beyond CSR: Making a Case for Human Rights and Justice.Florian Wettstein - 2009 - Business and Society Review 114 (1):125-152.
  • The Normative Justification of Integrative Stakeholder Engagement: A Habermasian View on Responsible Leadership.Moritz Patzer, Christian Voegtlin & Andreas Georg Scherer - 2018 - Business Ethics Quarterly 28 (3):325-354.
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  • Uncommitted Deliberation? Discussing Regulatory Gaps by Comparing GRI 3.1 to GRI 4.0 in a Political CSR Perspective.Rea Wagner & Peter Seele - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (2):333-351.
    In this paper, we compare the two Global Reporting Initiative reporting standards, G3.1, and the most current version G4.0. We do this through the lens of political corporate social responsibility theory, which describes the broadened understanding of corporate responsibility in a globalized world building on Habermas’ notion of deliberative democracy and ethical discourse. As the regulatory power of nation states is fading, regulatory gaps occur as side effects of transnational business. As a result, corporations are also understood to play a (...)
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  • Business Responses to Climate Change Regulation in Canada and Germany: Lessons for MNCs From Emerging Economies.Burkard Eberlein & Dirk Matten - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (S2):241 - 255.
    This article proposes a novel mapping of the complex relationship between business ethics and regulation, by suggesting five distinct ways in which business ethics and regulation may intersect. The framework is applied to a comparative case study of business responses to climate change regulation in Canada and Germany, both signatories to the Kyoto Protocol. Both countries represent distinctly different approaches which yield significant lessons for emerging economies. We also analyze the specific role of large multinational corporations in this process.
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  • Transnational Norm-Building Networks and the Legitimacy of Corporate Social Responsibility Standards.Ulrich Mueckenberger & Sarah Jastram - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):223-239.
    In the following article, we propose an analytical framework for the analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Standards based on the paradigmatic nexus of voice and entitlement. We follow the theory of decentration and present the concept of Transnational Norm-Building Networks (TNNs), which — as we argue — comprise a new nexus of voice and entitlement beyond the nation—state level. Furthermore, we apply the analytical framework to the ISO 26000 initiative and the Global Compact. We conclude the article with remarks (...)
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  • The Cosmopolitical Corporation.Thomas Maak - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (S3):361 - 372.
    In light of recent attempts to determine the political role and status of corporations I discuss the normative implications of considering multinational corporations (MNCs) as political actors. I posit that corporations do indeed have a new political role in a connected world, in particular with respect to matters of human rights, social and environmental justice. We thus find a growing need for ethical and political knowledge to inform and guide the emerging political co-responsibility of MNCs. I draw on the rich (...)
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  • Sector-Based Corporate Citizenship.Laura Timonen & Vilma Luoma-aho - 2010 - Business Ethics 19 (1):1-13.
    This paper approaches the much-debated issue of corporate citizenship (CC). Many models depict the development process of CC, and yet attempts to find one extensive definition remain in progress. We argue that more than one type of citizenship may be needed to fully describe the concept. So far, social factors have dominated the definitions of CC, but citizenship functions can also be found in other areas. In fact, for maximum benefit, the type of citizenship should be tied to the sector (...)
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  • The Duty to Protect: Corporate Complicity, Political Responsibility, and Human Rights Advocacy. [REVIEW]Florian Wettstein - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (1):33 - 47.
    Recent years have heralded increasing attention to the role of multinational corporations in regard to human rights violations. The concept of complicity has been of particular interest in this regard. This article explores the conceptual differences between silent complicity in particular and other, more "conventional" forms of complicity. Despite their far-reaching normative implications, these differences are often overlooked.Rather than being connected to specific actions as is the case for other forms of complicity, the concept of silent complicity is tied to (...)
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  • Business and Peace: Sketching the Terrain.Jennifer Oetzel, Michelle Westermann-Behaylo, Charles Koerber, Timothy L. Fort & Jorge Rivera - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S4):351-373.
    Our goals in this article are to summarize the existing literature on the role business can play in creating sustainable peace and to discuss important avenues for extending this research. As part of our discussion, we review the ethical arguments and related research made to date, including the rationale and motivation for businesses to engage in conflict resolution and peace building, and discuss how scholars are extending research in this area. We also focus on specific ways companies can actively engage (...)
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  • How to Overcome Structural Injustice? Social Connectedness and the Tenet of Subsidiarity.Michael S. Aßländer - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-14.
    Referring to the phenomenon of structural injustice resulting from unintended consequences of the combination of the actions of many people, Iris Marion Young claims for a new understanding of responsibility. She proposes what she calls a social connection model of responsibility which assigns responsibility to individuals also for participating in ongoing structural and social processes. To remedy structural injustice Young claims for collective action of various actors in society and assigns different degrees of responsibility depending on the agent’s position within (...)
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