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Daniel L. Schacter (1987). Implicit Memory: History and Current Status.

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  1.  2
    Intraoperative Awareness: Consciousness, Memory and Law.W. Glannon - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (10):663-664.
  2.  6
    Affective and Cognitive Reactions to Subliminal Flicker From Fluorescent Lighting.Igor Knez - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 26:97-104.
    This study renews the classical concept of subliminal perception by investigating the impact of subliminal flicker from fluorescent lighting on affect and cognitive performance. It was predicted that low compared to high frequency lighting would evoke larger changes in affective states and also impair cognitive performance. Subjects reported high rather than low frequency lighting to be more pleasant, which, in turn, enhanced their problem solving performance. This suggests that sensory processing can take place outside of conscious awareness resulting in conscious (...)
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  3.  29
    Bergson's Philosophy of Memory.Trevor Perri - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (12):837-847.
    Bergson identifies multiple forms of memory throughout his work. In Matter and Memory, Bergson considers memory from the perspectives of both psychology and metaphysics, and he describes what we might refer to as contraction memory, perception memory, habit memory, recollection memory, and pure memory. Further, in subsequent works, Bergson discusses at least two additional forms of memory – namely, a memory of the present and a non-intellectual memory of the will. However, it is often not clear how these different forms (...)
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  4.  11
    More Than Meets the Eye: Implicit Perception in Legally Blind Individuals.Alan S. Brown, Michael R. Best & David B. Mitchell - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):996-1002.
    Legally blind participants were able to identify a visual stimulus attribute in the absence of consciously identifying its presence. Specifically, participants—with their corrective lenses removed—correctly guessed the hour-hand position above chance on a clockface shown on a computer screen. This occurred both when presented in a 1-clockface display , as well as when shown a display containing 4 clockfaces , in which only 1 face contained a hand. Even more striking, hand identification accuracy in the 4-clockface condition was comparable whether (...)
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  5.  41
    The Cognitive Integration of E-Memory.Robert W. Clowes - 2013 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (1):107-133.
    If we are flexible, hybrid and unfinished creatures that tend to incorporate or at least employ technological artefacts in our cognitive lives, then the sort of technological regime we live under should shape the kinds of minds we possess and the sorts of beings we are. E-Memory consists in digital systems and services we use to record, store and access digital memory traces to augment, re-use or replace organismic systems of memory. I consider the various advantages of extended and embedded (...)
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  6. The Sense of Diachronic Personal Identity.Stan Klein - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):791-811.
    In this paper, I first consider a famous objection that the standard interpretation of the Lockean account of diachronicity (i.e., one’s sense of personal identity over time) via psychological connectedness falls prey to breaks in one’s personal narrative. I argue that recent case studies show that while this critique may hold with regard to some long-term autobiographical self-knowledge (e.g., episodic memory), it carries less warrant with respect to accounts based on trait-relevant, semantic self-knowledge. The second issue I address concerns the (...)
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  7.  43
    To Hear—to Say: The Mediating Presence of the Healing Witness. [REVIEW]Sheryl Brahnam - 2012 - AI and Society 27 (1):53-90.
    Illness and trauma challenge self-narratives. Traumatized individuals, unable to speak about their experiences, suffer in isolation. In this paper, I explore Kristeva’s theories of the speaking subject and signification, with its symbolic and semiotic modalities, to understand how a person comes to speak the unspeakable. In discussing the origin of the speaking subject, Kristeva employs Plato’s chora (related to choreo , “to make room for”). The chora reflects the mother’s preparation of the child’s entry into language and forms an interior (...)
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  8.  28
    Wherein is Human Cognition Systematic?Antoni Gomila, David Travieso & Lorena Lobo - 2012 - Minds and Machines 22 (2):101-115.
    The “systematicity argument” has been used to argue for a classical cognitive architecture (Fodor in The Language of Thought. Harvester Press, London, 1975, Why there still has to be a language of thought? In Psychosemantics, appendix. MIT Press, Cambridge, pp 135–154, 1987; Fodor and Pylyshyn in Cognition 28:3–71, 1988; Aizawa in The systematicity arguments. Kluwer Academic Press, Dordrecht, 2003). From the premises that cognition is systematic and that the best/only explanation of systematicity is compositional structure, it concludes that cognition is (...)
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  9.  33
    Looking for Arguments.Hugo Mercier - 2012 - Argumentation 26 (3):305-324.
    Abstract How do people find arguments while engaged in a discussion? Following an analogy with visual search, a mechanism that performs this task is described. It is a metarepresentational device that examines representations in a mostly serial manner until it finds a good enough argument supporting one’s position. It is argued that the mechanism described in dual process theories as ‘system 2’, or analytic reasoning fulfills these requirements. This provides support for the hypothesis that reasoning serves an argumentative function. Content (...)
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  10.  11
    Perceptually Specific and Perceptually Non-Specific Influences on Rereading Benefits for Spatially Transformed Text: Evidence From Eye Movements.Heather Sheridan & Eyal M. Reingold - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (4):1739-1747.
    The present study used eye tracking methodology to examine rereading benefits for spatially transformed text. Eye movements were monitored while participants read the same target word twice, in two different low-constraint sentence frames. The congruency of perceptual processing was manipulated by either applying the same type of transformation to the word during the first and second presentations , or employing two different types of transformations across the two presentations of the word . Perceptual specificity effects were demonstrated such that fixation (...)
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  11.  8
    Conscious and Unconscious Discriminations Between True and False Memories.Jerwen Jou - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):828-839.
    When subjects give higher confidence or memory ratings to a test word in a recognition test, do they simply raise their criterion without making better discrimination, or do they raise both criterion and true discrimination between the studied words and the lures? Given that previous studies found subjects’ false alarm responses to lures slower than to SW, and recognition latency inversely correlated with the confidence rating, can the latency difference between the lures and SW be accounted for by confidence or (...)
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  12.  83
    Conceptual Implicit Memory and Environmental Context.Neil W. Mulligan - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):737-744.
    Changes in environmental context between encoding and retrieval often affect explicit memory but research on implicit memory is equivocal. One proposal is that conceptual but not perceptual priming is influenced by context manipulations. However, findings with conceptual priming may be compromised by explicit contamination. The present study examined the effects of environmental context on conceptual explicit and implicit memory . Explicit recall was reduced by context change. The implicit test results depended on test awareness . Among test-unaware participants, priming was (...)
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  13.  29
    Das Leibgedächtnis. Ein Beitrag aus der Phänomenologie Husserls.Michela Summa - 2011 - Husserl Studies 27 (3):173-196.
  14.  25
    Inattentional Blindness for Ignored Words: Comparison of Explicit and Implicit Memory Tasks.Beverly C. Butler & Raymond Klein - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):811-819.
    Inattentional blindness is described as the failure to perceive a supra-threshold stimulus when attention is directed away from that stimulus. Based on performance on an explicit recognition memory test and concurrent functional imaging data Rees, Russell, Frith, and Driver [Rees, G., Russell, C., Frith, C. D., & Driver, J. . Inattentional blindness versus inattentional amnesia for fixated but ignored words. Science, 286, 2504–2507] reported inattentional blindness for word stimuli that were fixated but ignored. The present study examined both explicit and (...)
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  15.  27
    The Cost of Explicit Memory.Stephen E. Robbins - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (1):33-66.
    Within Piaget there is an implicit theory of the development of explicit memory. It rests in the dynamical trajectory underlying the development of causality, object, space and time – a complex (COST) supporting a symbolic relationship integral to the explicit. Cassirer noted the same dependency in the phenomena of aphasias, insisting that a symbolic function is being undermined in these deficits. This is particularly critical given the reassessment of Piaget’s stages as the natural bifurcations of a self-organizing dynamic system. The (...)
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  16.  17
    Experimental Dissociations Between Memory Measures: Influence of Retrieval Strategies.Sylvie Willems & Martial Van der Linden - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):39-55.
    The objective of this study was to explore the participants’ processing strategies on the mere exposure effect, object decision priming and explicit recognition. In Experiments 1, we observed that recognition and the mere exposure effect for unfamiliar three-dimensional objects were not dissociated by plane rotations in the same way as recognition and object decision priming. However, we showed that, under identical conditions, prompting analytic processing at testing produced a large plane rotation effect on recognition and the mere exposure effect similar (...)
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  17.  7
    Experimental Dissociations Between Memory Measures: Influence of Retrieval Strategies.Sylvie Willems & Martial Der Lindevann - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):39-55.
    The objective of this study was to explore the participants’ processing strategies on the mere exposure effect, object decision priming and explicit recognition. In Experiments 1, we observed that recognition and the mere exposure effect for unfamiliar three-dimensional objects were not dissociated by plane rotations in the same way as recognition and object decision priming. However, we showed that, under identical conditions, prompting analytic processing at testing produced a large plane rotation effect on recognition and the mere exposure effect similar (...)
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  18.  9
    Evidence That Nonconscious Processes Are Sufficient to Produce False Memories.S. Cotel, D. Gallo & J. Seamon - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):210-218.
    Are nonconscious processes sufficient to cause false memories of a nonstudied event? To investigate this issue, we controlled and measured conscious processing in the DRM task, in which studying associates causes false memories of nonstudied associates . During the study phase, subjects studied visually masked associates at extremely rapid rates, followed by immediate recall. After this initial phase, nonstudied test words were rapidly presented for perceptual identification, followed by recognition memory judgments. On the perceptual identification task, we found significant priming (...)
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  19.  4
    Perceptual Priming Enhances the Creation of New Episodic Memories.P. GagnePain, K. Lebreton, B. Desgranges & F. Eustache - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):276-287.
    In recent years, most studies of human memory systems have placed the emphasis on differences rather than on similarities. The present study sought to assess the impact of perceptual priming on the creation of new episodic memories. It was composed of three distinct experimental phases: an initial study phase, during which the number of repetitions of target words was manipulated; a perceptual priming test phase, involving both target and new control words, which constituted the incidental encoding phase of a subsequent (...)
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  20.  38
    What Antipriming Reveals About Priming.Chad J. Marsolek - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (5):176-181.
  21.  23
    Dissociating Perceptual and Representation-Based Contributions to Priming of Face Recognition☆.S. Boehm, E. KlostErmann, W. Sommer & K. Paller - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):163-174.
    Repetition priming of object identification refers to the phenomenon whereby experience with an object induces systematic changes in subsequent processing of that same object. This data-driven form of priming is distinct from conceptually-driven priming. To date, considerable controversy exists about whether data-driven priming reflects facilitation in perceptual processing or mediation by preexisting object representations. The present study concerned priming of recognizing familiar and unfamiliar faces and how this priming is influenced by face inversion, which interferes with perceptual face processing. Perceptual (...)
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  22.  31
    Change Blindness and Priming: When It Does and Does Not Occur.Michael E. Silverman & Arien Mack - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):409-422.
    In a series of three experiments, we explored the nature of implicit representations in change blindness . Using 3 × 3 letter arrays, we asked subjects to locate changes in paired arrays separated by 80 ms ISIs, in which one, two or three letters of a row in the second array changed. In one testing version, a tone followed the second array, signaling a row for partial report . In the other version, no PR was required. After Ss reported whether (...)
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  23.  19
    Subjective Measures of Unconscious Knowledge of Concepts.Eleni Ziori & Zoltán Dienes - 2006 - Mind and Society 5 (1):105-122.
    This paper considers different subjective measures of conscious and unconscious knowledge in a concept formation paradigm. In particular, free verbal reports are compared with two subjective measures, the zero-correlation and the guessing criteria, based on trial-by-trial confidence ratings (a type of on-line verbal report). Despite the fact that free verbal reports are frequently dismissed as being insensitive measures of conscious knowledge, a considerable bulk of research on implicit learning has traditionally relied on this measure of consciousness, because it is widely (...)
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  24.  3
    Does Priming with Awareness Reflect Explicit Contamination? An Approach with a Response-Time Measure in Word-Stem Completion.Séverine Fay, Michel Isingrini & Viviane Pouthas - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):459-473.
    The present experiment investigates the involvement of awareness in functional dissociations between explicit and implicit tests. In the explicit condition, participants attempted to recall lexically or semantically studied words using word stems. In the implicit condition, they were instructed to complete each stem with the first word which came to mind. Subjective awareness was subsequently measured on an item-by-item basis. As voluntary retrieval strategies are known to be time consuming, the time taken to complete each stem was recorded. In the (...)
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  25.  24
    Procedural Memory in Dissociative Identity Disorder: When Can Inter-Identity Amnesia Be Truly Established?☆.Rafaële J. C. Huntjens, Albert Postma, Liesbeth Woertman, Onno van Der Hart & Madelon L. Peters - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (2):377-389.
    In a serial reaction time task, procedural memory was examined in Dissociative Identity Disorder . Thirty-one DID patients were tested for inter-identity transfer of procedural learning and their memory performance was compared with 25 normal controls and 25 controls instructed to simulate DID. Results of patients seemed to indicate a pattern of inter-identity amnesia. Simulators, however, were able to mimic a pattern of inter-identity amnesia, rendering the results of patients impossible to interpret as either a pattern of amnesia or a (...)
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  26.  96
    Neurocognitive Mechanisms Underlying the Experience of Flow.A. Dietrich - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):746-761.
    Recent theoretical and empirical work in cognitive science and neuroscience is brought into contact with the concept of the flow experience. After a brief exposition of brain function, the explicit–implicit distinction is applied to the effortless information processing that is so characteristic of the flow state. The explicit system is associated with the higher cognitive functions of the frontal lobe and medial temporal lobe structures and has evolved to increase cognitive flexibility. In contrast, the implicit system is associated with the (...)
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  27.  54
    Availability, Accessibility, and Subliminal Perception.John F. Kihlstrom - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):92-100.
  28.  74
    Developmental Aspects of Consciousness: How Much Theory of Mind Do You Need to Be Consciously Aware?Josef Perner & Zoltán Dienes - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (1):63-82.
    When do children become consciously aware of events in the world? Five possible strategies are considered for their usefulness in determining the age in question. Three of these strategies ask when children show signs of engaging in activities for which conscious awareness seems necessary in adults , and two of the strategies consider when children have the ability to have the minimal form of higher-order thought necessary for access consciousness and phenomenal consciousness, respectively. The tentative answer to the guiding question (...)
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  29.  86
    Implicit Memory: Intention and Awareness Revisited.Laurie T. Butler & Dianne C. Berry - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (5):192-197.
  30.  57
    From Implicit Skills to Explicit Knowledge: A Bottom‐Up Model of Skill Learning.Edward Merrillb & Todd Petersonb - 2001 - Cognitive Science 25 (2):203-244.
  31.  27
    Simulating Consciousness in a Bilateral Neural Network: ''Nuclear'' and ''Fringe'' Awareness.N. D. Cook - 1999 - Consciousness and Cognition 8 (1):62-93.
    A technique for the bilateral activation of neural nets that leads to a functional asymmetry of two simulated ''cerebral hemispheres'' is described. The simulation is designed to perform object recognition, while exhibiting characteristics typical of human consciousness-specifically, the unitary nature of conscious attention, together with a dual awareness corresponding to the ''nucleus'' and ''fringe'' described by William James (1890). Sensory neural nets self-organize on the basis of five sensory features. The system is then taught arbitrary symbolic labels for a small (...)
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  32.  31
    Accounting for the Computational Basis of Consciousness: A Connectionist Approach.Ron Sun - 1999 - Consciousness and Cognition 8 (4):529-565.
    This paper argues for an explanation of the mechanistic (computational) basis of consciousness that is based on the distinction between localist (symbolic) representation and distributed representation, the ideas of which have been put forth in the connectionist literature. A model is developed to substantiate and test this approach. The paper also explores the issue of the functional roles of consciousness, in relation to the proposed mechanistic explanation of consciousness. The model, embodying the representational difference, is able to account for the (...)
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  33. Implicit Learning: News From the Front.Axel Cleeremans, Arnaud Destrebecqz & Maud Boyer - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (10):406-416.
    69 Thompson-Schill, S.L. _et al. _(1997) Role of left inferior prefrontal cortex 59 Buckner, R.L. _et al. _(1996) Functional anatomic studies of memory in retrieval of semantic knowledge: a re-evaluation _Proc. Natl. Acad._ retrieval for auditory words and pictures _J. Neurosci. _16, 6219–6235 _Sci. U. S. A. _94, 14792–14797 60 Buckner, R.L. _et al. _(1995) Functional anatomical studies of explicit and 70 Baddeley, A. (1992) Working memory: the interface between memory implicit memory retrieval tasks _J. Neurosci. _15, 12–29 and cognition (...)
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  34.  4
    An Electrophysiological Measure of Priming of Visual Word-Form.K. A. Paller, M. Kutas & H. K. McIsaac - 1998 - Consciousness and Cognition 7 (1):54-66.
    Priming and recollection are expressions of human memory mediated by different brain events. These brain events were monitored while people discriminated words from nonwords. Mean response latencies were shorter for words that appeared in an earlier study phase than for new words. This priming effect was reduced when the letters of words in study-phase presentations were presented individually in succession as opposed to together as complete words. Based on this outcome, visual word-form priming was linked to a brain potential recorded (...)
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  35.  22
    Implicit Short-Lived Motor Representations of Space in Brain Damaged and Healthy Subjects.Y. Rossetti - 1998 - Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):520-558.
    This article reviews experimental evidence for a specific sensorimotor function which can be dissociated from higher level representations of space. It attempts to delineate this function on the basis of results obtained by psychophysical experiments performed with brain damaged and healthy subjects. Eye and hand movement control exhibit automatic features, such that they are incompatible with conscious control. In addition, they rely on a reference frame different from the one used by conscious perception. Neuropsychological cases provide a strong support for (...)
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  36.  21
    The Mere Exposure Effect is Differentially Sensitive to Different Judgment Tasks.J. G. Seamon, P. A. McKenna & N. Binder - 1998 - Consciousness and Cognition 7 (1):85-102.
    The mere exposure effect is the increase in positive affect that results from the repeated exposure to previously novel stimuli. We sought to determine if judgments other than affective preference could reliably produce a mere exposure effect for two-dimensional random shapes. In two experiments, we found that brighter and darker judgments did not differentiate target from distracter shapes, liking judgments led to target selection greater than chance, and disliking judgments led to distracter selection greater than chance. These results for brighter, (...)
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  37.  10
    False Categories in Cognition: The Not-The-Liver Fallacy.Felice L. Bedford - 1997 - Cognition 64 (3):231-248.
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  38.  34
    Une théorie réflexive du souvenir épisodique.Jérôme Dokic - 1997 - Dialogue 36 (03):527-554.
    Cet article porte sur une distinction familière entre deux formes de souvenirs: les souvenirs factuels ('Je me souviens que p', où 'p' est une proposition) et les souvenirs épisodiques ('Je me souviens de x', où x est une entité particulière). Les souvenirs épisodiques ont, contrairement aux souvenirs factuels, un rapport immédiat et interne à une expérience particulière que le sujet a eue dans le passé. Les souvenirs épisodique et factuel sont des souvenirs explicites au sens de la psychologie cognitive. J'esquisse (...)
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  39.  33
    Cognitive Theism: Sources of Accommodation Between Secularism and Religion.Robert B. Glassman - 1996 - Zygon 31 (2):157-207.
  40.  6
    Constraints on Perceptual Learning: Objects and Dimensions.Felice L. Bedford - 1995 - Cognition 54 (3):253-297.
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  41.  79
    Self or No-Self? Converging Perspectives From Neuropsychology and Mysticism.Brian L. Lancaster - 1993 - Zygon 28 (4):507-526.
  42.  5
    The Selective Perception and Recognition of Single Words From Competing Dichotic Stimulus Pairs.G. Bonanno - 1992 - Consciousness and Cognition 1 (3):241-264.
    Five experiments are reported that concern selective perception and representation following dichotic presentations of competing word pairs differing only in their initial consonants . Only one word from each pair tended to be subjectively perceived, even when participants were encouraged to guess two words. Robust selective perception effects were evidenced as a function of stimulus affective valence. Control tasks showed that these effects could not be attributed to report biases or to the acoustic properties of the stimuli. The unreported words (...)
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  43.  9
    Memory Under Anesthesia: Evidence for Response Suppression.Alan S. Brown, Michael R. Best, David B. Mitchell & Lloyd C. Haggard - 1992 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (3):244-246.
  44.  6
    Dissociation and Dissociations: A Comment on Consciousness and Cognition.J. Kihlstrom - 1992 - Consciousness and Cognition 1 (1):47-53.
  45.  1
    Degree of Elaborative Processing in Two Implicit and Two Explicit Memory Tasks.Alfonso Pitarque, Salvador Algarabel & Enrique Meseguer - 1992 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (3):217-220.
  46.  2
    Evolution, Consciousness, and All That: A Reply to Baars and to Parker.A. Reber - 1992 - Consciousness and Cognition 1 (2):143-147.
  47.  61
    The Cognitive Unconscious: An Evolutionary Perspective.Arthur S. Reber - 1992 - Consciousness and Cognition 1 (2):93-133.
    In recent decades it has become increasingly clear that a substantial amount of cognitive work goes on independent of consciousness. The research has been carried out largely under two rubrics, implicit learning and implicit memory. The former has been concerned primarily with the acquisition of knowledge independent of awareness and the latter with the manner in which memories not readily available to conscious recall or recognition play a role in behavior; collectively these operations comprise the essential functions of the cognitive (...)
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  48.  3
    Setting Boundary Conditions on the Part-Set Cuing Effect.Barbara H. Basden, David R. Basden, Barbara A. Church & Pat Beaupre - 1991 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (2):213-216.
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  49.  4
    Facilitating Word-Fragment Completion with Hidden Primes.Stephen Madigan, Joan McDowd & Dana Murphy - 1991 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (2):189-191.
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    Implicit Memory, the Serial Position Effect, and Test Awareness.John M. Rybash & Joyce L. Osborne - 1991 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (4):327-330.
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