Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Philosophical investigations into the essence of pediatric suffering.Tyler Tate - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (4):137-142.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Asia-Pacific Perspectives on the Medical Ethics.Darryl R. J. Macer - 2008 - UNESCO Bangkok.
    A compilation of 16 papers selected from two UNESCO Bangkok Bioethics Roundtables, with research and policy dialogues from different countries in the region. It includes papers on informed consent, ethics committees, communication, organ transplants, traditional medicines and sex selection.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Expert Testimony by Persons Trained in Ethical Reasoning: The Case of Andrew Sawatzky.Françoise Baylis - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):224-231.
    In February 1999, I received a call from a lawyer at Hill Abra Dewar stating that she had instructions to retain my services as an expert witness in the case of Sawatzky v. Riverview Health Centre. She was representing the Manitoba League of Persons with Disabilities which had intervenor status.In Canada the admission of expert testimony depends upon the application of four criteria outlined in R. v. Mohan by Justice Sopinka. These criteria are: relevance; necessity in assisting the trier of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Expert Testimony by Persons Trained in Ethical Reasoning: The Case of Andrew Sawatzky.Françoise Baylis - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):224-231.
    In February 1999, I received a call from a lawyer at Hill Abra Dewar stating that she had instructions to retain my services as an expert witness in the case of Sawatzky v. Riverview Health Centre. She was representing the Manitoba League of Persons with Disabilities which had intervenor status.In Canada the admission of expert testimony depends upon the application of four criteria outlined in R. v. Mohan by Justice Sopinka. These criteria are: relevance; necessity in assisting the trier of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Testing the Medical Covenant: Caring for Patients with Advanced Dementia.William F. May - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (1):45-50.
    End-of-life care, particularly for patients with advanced dementia, tests the medical covenant, both the integrity and aptness of what physicians have to offer and the fidelity with which they offer it. This article considers five ways of justifying the unilateral withholding of future treatment: (1) an affirmation of professional autonomy; (2) a defense of professional integrity; (3) a parentalist exercise of power on behalf of the patient and/or family; (4) a protection of the interests of third parties (footing the bill); (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Futility Clarified.Eric Chwang - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (3):487-495.
    Futility is easily defined as uselessness. The mistaken appearance that it cannot be defined is explained by difficulties applying it to particular cases. This latter problem is a major goal of clinical training and cannot be solved in a pithy statement.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Usage of Do-Not-Attempt-to-Resuscitate Orders in a Swedish Community Hospital – Patient Involvement, Documentation and Compliance.Emilie Bertilsson, Birgitta Semark, Kristina Schildmeijer, Anders Bremer & Jörg Carlsson - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-6.
    Background To characterize patients dying in a community hospital with or without attempting cardiopulmonary resuscitation and to describe patient involvement in, documentation of, and compliance with decisions on resuscitation. Methods All patients who died in Kalmar County Hospital during January 1, 2016 until December 31, 2016 were included. All information from the patients’ electronic chart was analysed. Results Of 660 patients female), 30 were pronounced dead in the emergency department after out-of-hospital CPR. Of the remaining 630 patients a DNAR order (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Practice: Philosophy Through a Wide-Angle Lens.Janet Malek - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (1):1-7.
    Philosophers who specialize in bioethics face a distinctive set of challenges in our work: to bring the theoretical insights of philosophical work and methodology to practical dilemmas affecting a diverse group of stakeholders every day. This article describes some of the key contributions that philosophy can make to the field of bioethics. It also identifies some of the pitfalls that can undermine the value of a philosophical approach when used to analyze questions arising in the real world. Recognition of the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Reasons Doctors Provide Futile Treatment at the End of Life: A Qualitative Study.Lindy Willmott, Benjamin White, Cindy Gallois, Malcolm Parker, Nicholas Graves, Sarah Winch, Leonie Kaye Callaway, Nicole Shepherd & Eliana Close - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (8):496-503.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • The Best Interests of Persistently Vegetative Patients: To Die Rather That to Live?Tak Kwong Chan & George Lim Tipoe - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):202-204.
    Adults without the capacity to make their own medical decisions have their rights protected under the Mental Capacity Act in the UK. The underlying principle of the court's decisions is the best interests test, and the evaluation of best interests is a welfare appraisal. Although the House of Lords in the well-known case of Bland held that the decision to withhold treatment for patients in a persistent vegetative state should not be based on their best interests, judges in recent cases (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • At the Coalface--Medical Ethics in Practice. Futility and Death in Paediatric Medical Intensive Care.I. M. Balfour-Lynn & R. C. Tasker - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (5):279-281.
    We have conducted a retrospective study of deaths on a paediatric medical intensive care unit over a two-year period and reviewed similar series from outside the UK. There were 89 deaths out of 651 admission (13.7% mortality). In almost two-thirds of the cases death occurred with a decision to limit medical treatment or withdraw mechanical ventilation, implying that additional or further therapy was considered futile. We highlight this as a crucially important issue in the practice of intensive care. More comprehensive (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Resuscitation Decisions in the Elderly: A Discussion of Current Thinking.P. N. Bruce-Jones - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (5):286-291.
    Decisions about cardiopulmonary resuscitation may be based on medical prognosis, quality of life and patients' choices. Low survival rates indicate its overuse. Although the concept of medical futility has limitations, several strong predictors of non-survival have been identified and prognostic indices developed. Early results indicate that consideration of resuscitation in the elderly should be very selective, and support "opt-in" policies. In this minority of patients, quality of life is the principal issue. This is subjective and best assessed by the individual (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Medical Futility, Treatment Withdrawal and the Persistent Vegetative State.K. R. Mitchell, I. H. Kerridge & T. J. Lovat - 1993 - Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (2):71-76.
    Why do we persist in the relentless pursuit of artificial nourishment and other treatments to maintain a permanently unconscious existence? In facing the future, if not the present world-wide reality of a huge number of persistent vegetative state (PVS) patients, will they be treated because of our ethical commitment to their humanity, or because of an ethical paralysis in the face of biotechnical progress? The PVS patient is cut off from the normal patterns of human connection and communication, with a (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Deciding Not to Resuscitate in Dutch Hospitals.J. J. van Delden, P. J. van der Maas, L. Pijnenborg & C. W. Looman - 1993 - Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (4):200-205.
    The use of do not resuscitate (DNR) orders in Dutch hospitals was studied as part of a nationwide study on medical decisions concerning the end of life. DNR decisions are made in 6 per cent of all admissions, and 61 per cent of all in-hospital deaths were preceded by a DNR decision. We found that in only 14 per cent of the cases had the patients been involved in the DNR decision (32 per cent of competent patients). The concept of (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Medical Futility: A Conceptual Model.R. K. Mohindra - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (2):71-75.
    This paper introduces the medical factual matrix as a new and potentially valuable tool in medical ethical analysis. Using this tool it demonstrates the idea that a defined medical intervention can only be meaningfully declared futile in relation to a defined goal of treatment. It argues that a declaration of futility made solely in relation to a defined medical intervention is inchoate. It recasts the definition of goal futility as an intervention that cannot alter the probability of the existence of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Perceptions of Patients on the Utility or Futility of End-of-Life Treatment.K. L. Rodriguez - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (8):444-449.
    Background and objectives: Definitions of medical futility, offered by healthcare professionals, bioethicists and other experts, have been rigorously debated by many investigators, but the perceptions of patients of futility have been explored only by a few. Patients were allowed to discuss their concerns about end-of-life care, so that their ideas about treatment futility or utility could be extrapolated by us.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, in-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted with 30 elderly people who were receiving outpatient care in a large, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Should Patient Consent Be Required to Write a Do Not Resuscitate Order?P. Biegler - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (6):359-363.
    Consent ought to be required to withhold treatment that is in a patient’s best interests to receive. Do not resuscitate orders are examples of best interests assessments at the end of life. Such assessments represent value judgments that cannot be validly ascertained without patient input. If patient input results in that patient dissenting to the DNR order then individual physicians are not justified in overriding such dissent. To do so would give unjustifiable primacy to the values of the individual physician. (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Conditions and Consequences of Medical Futility--From a Literature Review to a Clinical Model.R. Lofmark - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):115-119.
    Objectives: To present an analysis of “futility” that is useful in the clinical setting.Design: Literature review.Material and methods: According to Medline more than 750 articles have been published about medical futility. Three criteria singled out 43 of them. The authors' opinions about futility were analysed using the scheme: “If certain conditions are satisfied, then a particular measure is futile” and “If a particular measure is futile, then certain moral consequences are implied”.Results: Regarding conditions, most authors stated that judgments about futility (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Futility has No Utility in Resuscitation Medicine.M. Ardagh - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (5):396-399.
    “Futility” is a word which means the absence of benefit. It has been used to describe an absence of utility in resuscitation endeavours but it fails to do this. Futility does not consider the harms of resuscitation and we should consider the balance of benefit and harm that results from our resuscitation endeavours. If a resuscitation is futile then any harm that ensues will bring about an unfavourable benefit/harm balance. However, even if the endeavour is not futile, by any definition, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Evaluating a Patient's Request for Life-Prolonging Treatment: An Ethical Framework.Eva C. Winkler, Wolfgang Hiddemann & Georg Marckmann - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (11):647-651.
    Contrary to the widespread concern about over-treatment at the end of life, today, patient preferences for palliative care at the end of life are frequently respected. However, ethically challenging situations in the current healthcare climate are, instead, situations in which a competent patient requests active treatment with the goal of life-prolongation while the physician suggests best supportive care only. The argument of futility has often been used to justify unilateral decisions made by physicians to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatment. However, (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Medical Futility at the End of Life: The Perspectives of Intensive Care and Palliative Care Clinicians.Ralf J. Jox, Andreas Schaider, Georg Marckmann & Gian Domenico Borasio - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (9):540-545.
    Objectives Medical futility at the end of life is a growing challenge to medicine. The goals of the authors were to elucidate how clinicians define futility, when they perceive life-sustaining treatment (LST) to be futile, how they communicate this situation and why LST is sometimes continued despite being recognised as futile. Methods The authors reviewed ethics case consultation protocols and conducted semi-structured interviews with 18 physicians and 11 nurses from adult intensive and palliative care units at a tertiary hospital in (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • A Randomized Trial of Ethics Education for Medical House Officers.D. P. Sulmasy, G. Geller, D. M. Levine & R. R. Faden - 1993 - Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (3):157-163.
    We report the results of a randomized trial to assess the impact of an innovative ethics curriculum on the knowledge and confidence of 85 medical house officers in a university hospital programme, as well as their responses to a simulated clinical case. Twenty-five per cent of the house officers received a lecture series, 25 per cent received lectures and case conferences, with an ethicist in attendance, and 50 per cent served as controls. A post-intervention questionnaire was administered. Knowledge scores did (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Balancing Legitimate Critical-Care Interests: Setting Defensible Care Limits Through Policy Development.Jeffrey Kirby - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (1):38-47.
    Critical-care decision making is highly complex, given the need for health care providers and organizations to consider, and constructively respond to, the diverse interests and perspectives of a variety of legitimate stakeholders. Insights derived from an identified set of ethics-related considerations have the potential to meaningfully inform inclusive and deliberative policy development that aims to optimally balance the competing obligations that arise in this challenging, clinical decision-making domain. A potential, constructive outcome of such policy engagement is the collaborative development of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • No Last Resort: Pitting the Right to Die Against the Right to Medical Self-Determination.Michael Cholbi - 2015 - The Journal of Ethics 19 (2):143-157.
    Many participants in debates about the morality of assisted dying maintain that individuals may only turn to assisted dying as a ‘last resort’, i.e., that a patient ought to be eligible for assisted dying only after she has exhausted certain treatment or care options. Here I argue that this last resort condition is unjustified, that it is in fact wrong to require patients to exhaust a prescribed slate of treatment or care options before being eligible for assisted dying. The last (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Same Coin-Different Sides? Futility and Patient Refusal of Treatment.Eleanor Milligan - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):141-143.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Futility Determination as a Process: Problems with Medical Sovereignty, Legal Issues and the Strengths and Weakness of the Procedural Approach. [REVIEW]Cameron Stewart - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):155-163.
    Futility is not a purely medical concept. Its subjective nature requires a balanced procedural approach where competing views can be aired and in which disputes can be resolved with procedural fairness. Law should play an important role in this process. Pure medical models of futility are based on a false claim of medical sovereignty. Procedural approaches avoid the problems of such claims. This paper examines the arguments for and against the adoption of a procedural approach to futility determination.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Medical Futility and the Death of a Child.Nancy S. Jecker - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):133-139.
    Our response to death may differ depending on the patient’s age. We may feel that death is a sad, but acceptable event in an elderly patient, yet feel that death in a very young patient is somehow unfair. This paper explores whether there is any ethical basis for our different responses. It examines in particular whether a patient’s age should be relevant to the determination that an intervention is medically futile. It also considers the responsibilities of health professionals and the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Problem with Rescue Medicine.N. S. Jecker - 2013 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (1):64-81.
    Is there a rational and ethical basis for efforts to rescue individuals in dire straits? When does rescue have ethical support, and when does it reflect an irrational impulse? This paper defines a Rule of Rescue and shows its intuitive appeal. It then proceeds to argue that this rule lacks support from standard principles of justice and from ethical principles more broadly, and should be rejected in many situations. I distinguish between agent-relative and agent-neutral reasons, and argue that the Rule (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • A New Approach to the Issue of Medical Futility: Reframing the Debate.Sophie Kasimow - unknown
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Lethal.Tracy K. Koogler & Benjamin S. Wilfond - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Ethics of Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Howard J. Curzer - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (5):533 – 562.
    In this article I rebut conservative objections to five phases of embryonic stem cell research. I argue that researchers using existing embryonic stem cell lines are not complicit in the past destruction of embryos because beneficiaries of immoral acts are not necessary morally tainted. Second, such researchers do not encourage the destruction of additional embryos because fertility clinics presently destroy more spare embryos than researchers need. Third, actually harvesting stem cells from slated-to-be-discarded embryos is not wrong. The embryos are not (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Everything I Really Needed to Know to Be a Clinical Ethicist, I Learned From Elisabeth Kübler-Ross.Mark G. Kuczewski - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (12):13-18.
    I analyze the insights present in Elisabeth Kübler-Ross’s seminal work, On Death and Dying that have laid the foundation for contemporary clinical bioethics as it is practiced by clinical ethics co...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • “Erring on the Side of Life” Is Sometimes an Error: Physicians Have the Primary Responsibility to Correct This.Arthur R. Derse - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (2):39-41.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Seeking Context for the Duty to Rescue: Contractualism and Trust in Research Institutions.Karen M. Meagher - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (2):18-20.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Rethinking Rescue Medicine.Nancy S. Jecker - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (2):12-18.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Rationing: A “Decent Minimum” or a “Consumer Driven” Health Care System?John J. Paris - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (7):16 - 18.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 7, Page 16-18, July 2011.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Futility and Fairness: A Defense of the Texas Advance Directive Law.Nancy S. Jecker - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (8):43-46.
  • The Texas Advance Directives Act Is Not About Professional Integrity.Tom Tomlinson - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (8):46-48.
  • The Texas Advanced Directive Law: Unfinished Business.Michael Kapottos & Stuart Youngner - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (8):34-38.
    The Texas Advance Directive Act allows physicians and hospitals to overrule patient or family requests for futile care. Purposefully not defining futility, the law leaves its determination in specific cases to an institutional process. While the law has received several criticisms, it does seem to work constructively in the cases that come to the review process. We introduce a new criticism: While the law has been justified by an appeal to professional values such as avoiding harm to patients, avoiding the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Experts' Attitudes Towards Medical Futility: An Empirical Survey From Japan. [REVIEW]Alireza Bagheri, Atsushi Asai & Ryuichi Ida - 2006 - BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundThe current debate about medical futility is mostly driven by theoretical and personal perspectives and there is a lack of empirical data to document experts and public attitudes towards medical futility.MethodsTo examine the attitudes of the Japanese experts in the fields relevant to medical futility a questionnaire survey was conducted among the members of the Japan Association for Bioethics. A total number of 108 questionnaires returned filled in, giving a response rate of 50.9%. Among the respondents 62% were healthcare professionals (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Evaluating PAD Requests in Psychiatry: The Importance of Involving Others.Guy Widdershoven, Yolande Voskes, Gerben Meynen & Suzanne Metselaar - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):63-65.
    Volume 19, Issue 10, October 2019, Page 63-65.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Physician Aid-in-Dying for Individuals With Serious Mental Illness: Clarifying Decision-Making Capacity and Psychiatric Futility.Dominic A. Sisti, Maria A. Oquendo, Yingcheng Xu & Rocksheng Zhong - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):61-63.
    Volume 19, Issue 10, October 2019, Page 61-63.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Honesty in Shared Decision Making When Last-Ditch Efforts Fail.Alexander A. Kon & Mary Devereaux - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (1):12-14.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Convergent Expert Views on Decision-Making for Decompressive Craniectomy in Malignant MCA Syndrome.Daniel Mendelsohn, Charles S. Haw & Judy Illes - 2014 - Neuroethics 7 (3):365-372.
    Background and PurposeThe decision to perform decompressive craniectomy for patients with malignant MCA syndrome can be ethically complex. We investigated factors that clinicians consider in this decision-making process.MethodsA survey including clinical vignettes and attitudes questions surrounding the use of hemicraniectomy in malignant MCA syndrome was distributed to 203 neurosurgeons, neurologists, staff and residents, and nurses and allied health members specializing in the care of neurological patients. These were practicing health care providers situated in an urban setting in Canada where access (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ethical Problems in Intensive Care Unit Admission and Discharge Decisions: A Qualitative Study Among Physicians and Nurses in the Netherlands.Anke J. M. Oerlemans, Nelleke van Sluisveld, Eric S. J. van Leeuwen, Hub Wollersheim, Wim J. M. Dekkers & Marieke Zegers - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):9.
    There have been few empirical studies into what non-medical factors influence physicians and nurses when deciding about admission and discharge of ICU patients. Information about the attitudes of healthcare professionals about this process can be used to improve decision-making about resource allocation in intensive care. To provide insight into ethical problems that influence the ICU admission and discharge process, we aimed to identify and explore ethical dilemmas healthcare professionals are faced with.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Defining Medical Futility and Improving Medical Care.Lawrence J. Schneiderman - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):123-131.
    It probably should not be surprising, in this time of soaring medical costs and proliferating technology, that an intense debate has arisen over the concept of medical futility. Should doctors be doing all the things they are doing? In particular, should they be attempting treatments that have little likelihood of achieving the goals of medicine? What are the goals of medicine? Can we agree when medical treatment fails to achieve such goals? What should the physician do and not do under (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Buddhism and Medical Futility.Tuck Wai Chan & Desley Hegney - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (4):433-438.
    Religious faith and medicine combine harmoniously in Buddhist views, each in its own way helping Buddhists enjoy a more fruitful existence. Health care providers need to understand the spiritual needs of patients in order to provide better care, especially for the terminally ill. Using a recently reported case to guide the reader, this paper examines the issue of medical futility from a Buddhist perspective. Important concepts discussed include compassion, suffering, and the significance of the mind. Compassion from a health professional (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Restricting Access to ART on the Basis of Criminal Record: An Ethical Analysis of a State-Enforced “Presumption Against Treatment” With Regard to Assisted Reproductive Technologies.Kara Thompson & Rosalind McDougall - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (3):511-520.
    As assisted reproductive technologies become increasingly popular, debate has intensified over the ethical justification for restricting access to ART based on various medical and non-medical factors. In 2010, the Australian state of Victoria enacted world-first legislation that denies access to ART for all patients with certain criminal or child protection histories. Patients and their partners are identified via a compulsory police and child protection check prior to commencing ART and, if found to have a previous relevant conviction or child protection (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Institutional Futility Policies Are Inherently Unfair.Philip M. Rosoff - 2013 - HEC Forum 25 (3):191-209.
    For many years a debate has raged over what constitutes futile medical care, if patients have a right to demand what doctors label as futile, and whether physicians should be obliged to provide treatments that they think are inappropriate. More recently, the argument has shifted away from the difficult project of definitions, to outlining institutional policies and procedures that take a measured and patient-by-patient approach to deciding if an existing or desired intervention is futile. The prototype is the Texas Advance (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Placebogenic Potential is No Reason to Favour Pharmaceutical Advertising.Paul Biegler - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (1):1-11.
    Advertisements for pharmaceuticals may promote placebo responses by generating an expectation of therapeutic success. Some cite this as reason to favour Direct to Consumer Advertising of Prescription Pharmaceuticals (DTCA). Against this, I show placebo responses to emanate from beliefs rendered unjustified by the influence of a conditioning process. I argue that drug safety and efficacy are material properties and that unjustified beliefs in these domains entail costs to autonomy that outweigh any prudential gains attending a placebo response. I conclude that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation