Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Absential Suspension: Malebranche and Locke on Human Freedom.Julie Walsh & Thomas M. Lennon - 2019 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 1 (1):1-17.
    This paper treats a heretofore-unnoticed concept in the history of the philosophical discussion of human freedom, a kind of freedom that is not defined solely in terms of the causal power of the agent. Instead, the exercise of freedom essentially involves the non-occurrence of something. That being free involves the non-occurrence, that is, the absence, of an act may seem counterintuitive. With the exception of those specifically treated in this paper, philosophers tend to think of freedom as intimately involved with (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Emotional Sensations and the Moral Imagination in Malebranche.Jordan Taylor - 2013 - In H. Martyn Lloyd (ed.), The Discourse of Sensibility: The Knowing Body in the Enlightenment. Springer.
    This paper explores the details of Malebranche‘s philosophy of mind, paying particular attention to the mind-body relationship and the roles of the imagination and the passions. I demonstrate that Malebranche has available an alternative to his deontological ethical system: the alternative I expose is based around his account of the embodied aspects of the mind and the sensations experienced in perception. I briefly argue that Hume, a philosopher already indebted to Malebranche for much inspiration, read Malebranche in the positive way (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Consciousness as Inner Sensation: Crusius and Kant.Jonas Jervell Indregard - 2018 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 5.
    What is it that makes a mental state conscious? Recent commentators have proposed that for Kant, consciousness results from differentiation: A mental state is conscious insofar as it is distinguished, by means of our conceptual capacities, from other states and/or things. I argue instead that Kant’s conception of state consciousness is sensory: A mental state is conscious insofar as it is accompanied by an inner sensation. Interpreting state consciousness as inner sensation reveals an underappreciated influence of Crusius on Kant’s view, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Malebranche and the Riddle of Sensation.Walter Ott - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (3):689-712.
    Like their contemporary counterparts, early modern philosophers find themselves in a predicament. On one hand, there are strong reasons to deny that sensations are representations. For there seems to be nothing in the world for them to represent. On the other hand, some sensory representations seem to be required for us to experience bodies. How else could one perceive the boundaries of a body, except by means of different shadings of color? I argue that Nicolas Malebranche offers an extreme -- (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Descartes, Malebranche and Leibniz: Conceptions of Substance in Arguments for the Immateriality of the Soul.Marleen Rozemond - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (5):836-857.
    ABSTRACTThe most prominent early modern argument against materialism is to be found in Descartes. Previously I had argued that this argument relies crucially on a robust conception of substance, according to which it has a single principal attribute of which all its other intrinsic qualities are modes. In the present paper I return to this claim. In Section 2, I address a question that is often raised about that conception of substance: its commitment to the idea that a substance has (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Book Reviews. [REVIEW][author unknown] - 2004 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (3):535-569.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Malebranche's Doctrine of Freedom / Consent and the Incompleteness of God's Volitions.Andrew Pessin - 2000 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (1):21 – 53.
    'God needs no instruments to act', Malebranche writes in Search 6.2.3; 'it suffices that He wills in order that a thing be, because it is a contradiction that He should will and that what He wills should not happen. Therefore, His power is His will' (450). After nearly identical language in Treatise 1.12, Malebranche writes that '[God's] wills are necessarily efficacious ... [H]is power differs not at all from [H]is will' (116). God's causal power, here, clearly traces only to His (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Malebranche's Method: Knowledge and Evidence.David Scott - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (1):169 – 183.
  • Leibniz on the Metaphysics of Color.Stephen Puryear - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (2):319-346.
    Drawing on remarks scattered through his writings, I argue that Leibniz has a highly distinctive and interesting theory of color. The central feature of the theory is the way in which it combines a nuanced subjectivism about color with a reductive approach of a sort usually associated with objectivist theories of color. After reconstructing Leibniz's theory and calling attention to some of its most notable attractions, I turn to the apparent incompatibility of its subjective and reductive components. I argue that (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Descartes on Human Freedom.Marie Jayasekera - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (8):527-539.
    In this paper, I explore René Descartes' conception of human freedom. I begin with the key interpretive challenges of Descartes' remarks and then turn to two foundational issues in the secondary literature: the philosophical backdrop of Descartes' remarks and the notions of freedom that commentators have used to characterize Descartes. The remainder of the paper is focused on the main current debate: Descartes' position on the relationship between freedom and determinism.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Malebranche and Occasional Causes.David Cunning - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (3):471–490.
    In VI.ii.3 of The Search After Truth Malebranche offers an argument for the view that only God is a cause. Here I defend an interpretation of the argument according to which Malebranche is supposing (quite rightly) that if there is a necessary connection between a cause and its effect, then if creatures were real causes, God's volitions would not be sufficient to bring about their intended effects. I then consider the argument from constant creation that Malebranche offers in Dialogues on (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Malebranche's "Vision in God".Andrew Pessin - 2006 - Philosophy Compass 1 (1):36–47.
  • Cartesian Modes and The Simplicity of Mind.Galen Barry - 2015 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 96 (1):54-76.
    Malebranche argues that we lack a clear idea of the mind because we cannot, even in principle, derive all the possible modes of mind solely from the idea of thought. But we can, in principle, derive all the possible modes of body from the idea of extension. Therefore, there is epistemic asymmetry between our ideas of mind and body. I offer a defense of Descartes whereby he can assert that we have a clear idea of mind despite this asymmetry. I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Hume on Mental Transparency.Hsueh Qu - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 98 (4):576-601.
    This article investigates Hume's account of mental transparency. In this article, I will endorse Qualitative Transparency – that is, the thesis that we cannot fail to apprehend the qualitative characters of our current perceptions, and these apprehensions cannot fail to be veridical – on the basis that, unlike its competitors, it is both weak enough to accommodate the introspective mistakes that Hume recognises, and yet strong enough to make sense of his positive employments of mental transparency. Moreover, Qualitative Transparency is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Malebranche and Descartes on Method: Psychologism, Free Will, and Doubt.David Scott - 2008 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (4):581-604.
    The subject of this paper is Malebranche’s relation to Descartes on the question of method. Using recent commentary as a springboard, it examines whether Malebranche advances a nonpsychologistic account of method, in contrast to the psychologism typically thought to characterize the Cartesian view. I explore this question with respect to two issues of central importance to method generally: doubt and free will. My argument is that, despite superficial differences of emphasis, Descartes and Malebranche adopt positions on doubt and free will (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation