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  1. Scientific Publishing and the Reading of Science in Nineteenth-Century Britain: A Historiographical Survey and Guide to Sources.Jonathan R. Topham - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 31 (4):559-612.
  • Thomas Reid and the Problem of Induction: From Common Experience to Common Sense.Benjamin W. Redekop - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (1):35-57.
    By the middle of the eighteenth century the new science had challenged the intellectual primacy of common experience in favor of recondite, expert and even counter-intuitive knowledge increasingly mediated by specialized instruments. Meanwhile modern philosophy had also problematized the perceptions of common experience — in the case of David Hume this included our perception of causal relations in nature, a fundamental precondition of scientific endeavor.In this article I argue that, in responding to the ‘problem of induction’ as advanced by Hume, (...)
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  • Correlation and Control: William Robert Grove and the Construction of a New Philosophy of Scientific Reform.Iwan Rhys Morus - 1990 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 22 (4):589-621.
  • Collecting Airs and Ideas: Priestley’s Style of Experimental Reasoning.Victor D. Boantza - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (3):506-522.
    It has often been claimed that Priestley was a skilful experimenter who lacked the capacities to analyze his own experiments and bring them to a theoretical closure. In attempts to revise this view some scholars have alluded to Priestley’s ‘synoptic’ powers while others stressed the contextual role of British Enlightenment in understanding his chemical research. A careful analysis of his pneumatic reports, privileging the dynamics of his experimental practice, uncovers significant yet neglected aspects of Priestley’s science. By focusing on his (...)
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  • A ‘Monster with Human Visage’: The Orangutan, Savagery, and the Borders of Humanity in the Global Enlightenment.Silvia Sebastiani - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:095269511983661.
    To what extent did the debate on the orangutan contribute to the global Enlightenment? This article focuses on the first 150 years of the introduction, dissection, and public exposition of the so-called ‘orangutan’ in Europe, between the 1630s, when the first specimens arrived in the Netherlands, and the 1770s, when the British debate about slavery and abolitionism reframed the boundaries between the human and animal kingdoms. Physicians, natural historians, antiquarians, philosophers, geographers, lawyers, and merchants all contributed to the knowledge of (...)
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  • Toward a Sociology of Public Demonstrations.Claude Rosental - 2013 - Sociological Theory 31 (4):343-365.
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  • Philosophical Toys Today.Tomáš Dvořák - 2013 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 35 (2):173-196.
    The article introduces a thematic issue of the journal Theory of Science that attempts to revive the category of "philosophi- cal toys" - objects and instruments designed for experimental scientific research that simultaneously played crucial role in the creation of the modern visual culture. It claims that to fully understand their nature and the kind of experience philosophical toys induce, it is necessary to situate their origins in eighteenth-century experimental science and aesthetics and proposes to approach them as perceptual and (...)
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  • The Business of Experimental Physics: Instrument Makers and Itinerant Lecturers in the German Enlightenment.Oliver Hochadel - 2007 - Science & Education 16 (6):525-537.
  • The Two Cultures of Electricity: Between Entertainment and Edification in Victorian Science.Iwan Rhys Morus - 2007 - Science & Education 16 (6):593-602.
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  • Aesthetic Appreciation of Experiments: The Case of 18th-Century Mimetic Experiments.Alexander Rueger - 2002 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (1):49 – 59.
    This article analyzes a type of experiment, very popular in 18th-century natural philosophy, which has apparently not led to insights into nature but which was aesthetically especially attractive. These experiments--"mimetic experiments"--allow us to trace a connection between aesthetic appreciation in science and in art contemporaneous with the science. I use this case as a problem for McAllister's theory of aesthetic induction according to which aesthetic standards in science tend to be associated with empirical success and propose an alternative mechanism that (...)
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  • Context, Image and Function: A Preliminary Enquiry Into the Architecture of Scientific Societies.Sophie Forgan - 1986 - British Journal for the History of Science 19 (1):89-113.
    From the late eighteenth century onwards, urban life underwent increasingly rapid change as towns outgrew their limits, industries polluted their skies and rivers, and a host of new types of building appeared to cater for new needs and activities. Not only did towns look different, but, as Thomas Markus has said, ‘they also ‘felt’ different in the organization of the spaces they contained.’ Buildings which housed scientific activities—the learned societies, literary and philosophical societies, professional institutes, mechanics institutes, and by the (...)
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  • Why Is There No Hermeneutics of Natural Sciences? Some Preliminary Theses.Gyorgy Markus - 1987 - Science in Context 1 (1):5-51.
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  • Graphic Understanding: Instruments and Interpretation in Robert Hooke's Micrographia.Michael Aaron Dennis - 1989 - Science in Context 3 (2):309-364.
  • What is a Scientific Instrument, When Did It Become One, and Why?Deborah Jean Warner - 1990 - British Journal for the History of Science 23 (1):83-93.
  • Lectures on Natural Philosophy in London, 1750–1765: S. C. T. Demainbray and the ‘Inattention’ of His Countrymen.A. Q. Morton - 1990 - British Journal for the History of Science 23 (4):411-434.
    Over the last forty years several historians have drawn attention to aspects of the activities of lecturers on natural philosophy in Britain in the eighteenth century. Hans and others looked at the part these lecturers played in the development of education, particularly adult education. Musson and Robinson considered the possible connection between the work of the lecturers and the growth of industry, and Inkster and others have explored the relationship between lecturers and the institutions set up to support science, especially (...)
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  • The New Science and the Public Sphere in the Premodern Era.Jan C. C. Rupp - 1995 - Science in Context 8 (3):487-507.
  • ‘A Treasure of Hidden Vertues’: The Attraction of Magnetic Marketing.Patricia Fara - 1995 - British Journal for the History of Science 28 (1):5-35.
    When customers like Samuel Pepys visited the shop of Thomas Tuttell, instrument maker to the king, they could purchase a pack of mathematical playing-cards. The seven of spades, reproduced as Figure 1, depicted the diverse connotations of magnets, or loadstones. These cards cost a shilling, and were too expensive for many of the surveyors, navigators and other practitioners shown using Tuttell's instruments. They provide an early example of the products promising both diversion and improvement which were increasingly marketed to polite (...)
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  • Introduction.Alan Q. Morton - 1995 - British Journal for the History of Science 28 (1):1-3.
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  • The Show That Never Ends: Perpetual Motion in the Early Eighteenth Century.Simon Schaffer - 1995 - British Journal for the History of Science 28 (2):157-189.
    During high summer 1721, while rioters and bankrupts gathered outside Parliament, Robert Walpole's new ministry forced through a bill to clear up the wreckage left by the stock-market crash, the South Sea Bubble, and the visionary projects swept away when it burst. In early August the President of the Royal Society Isaac Newton, a major investor in South Sea stock, and the Society's projectors, learned of a new commercial scheme promising apparently automatic profits, a project for a perpetual motion. Their (...)
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  • Life, Death and Galvanism.Charlotte Sleigh - 1998 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 29 (2):219-248.
  • Life, Death and Galvanism.Charlotte Sleigh - 1998 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 29 (2):219-248.
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  • Watching the Fireworks: Early Modern Observation of Natural and Artificial Spectacles.Simon Werrett - 2011 - Science in Context 24 (2):167-182.
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  • ‘To Mend the Scheme of Providence’: Benjamin Franklin's Electrical Heterodoxy.C. R. C. Baxfield - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Science 46 (2):179-197.
    I suggest in this article that Benjamin Franklin's electrical experiments were naturalistic and reactive towards providential theories of natural harmony and electricity provided by the English experimentalists Stephen Hales, William Watson and Benjamin Wilson. Conceptualizing nature as a divine balance, Franklin rejected English arguments for God's conservation of nature's harmony, suggesting instead that nature had within itself the ability to re-equilibrate when rendered unbalanced. Whilst Franklin's work reveals an experimentally defined fissure between providential and naturalistic views of matter and motion (...)
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  • Unrolling Egyptian Mummies in Nineteenth-Century Britain.Gabriel Moshenska - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Science 47 (3):451-477.
    The unrolling of Egyptian mummies was a popular spectacle in mid-nineteenth-century Britain. In hospitals, theatres, homes and learned institutions mummified bodies, brought from Egypt as souvenirs or curiosities, were opened and examined in front of rapt audiences. The scientific study of mummies emerged within the contexts of early nineteenth-century Egyptomania, particularly following the decipherment of hieroglyphics in 1822, and the changing attitudes towards medicine, anatomy and the corpse that led to the 1832 Anatomy Act. The best-known mummy unroller of this (...)
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  • Looking Beyond History: The Optics of German Anthropology and the Critique of Humanism.Andrew Zimmerman - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 32 (3):385-411.
  • The Business of Experimental Physics: Instrument Makers and Itinerant Lecturers in the German Enlightenment.Oliver Hochadel - 2007 - Science & Education 16 (6):525-537.
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  • Minding Matter/Mattering Mind: Knowledge and the Subject in Nineteenth-Century Psychology.John Carson - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 30 (3):345-376.
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  • Balloon Madness: Politics, Public Entertainment, The Transatlantic Science of Flight, and Late Eighteenth-Century America.Matthew Pethers - 2010 - History of Science 48 (2):181-226.
  • Separate Spheres and Public Places: Reflections on the History of Science Popularization and Science in Popular Culture.Roger Cooter & Stephen Pumfrey - 1994 - History of Science 32 (97):237-267.
  • An Atttractive Therapy: Animal Magnetism in Eighteenth-Century England.P. Fara - 1995 - History of Science 33 (2):127-177.
  • Minding Matter/Mattering Mind: Knowledge and the Subject in Nineteenth-Century Psychology.J. Carson - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 30 (3):345-376.
  • How the «Principia» Got Its Name: Or, Taking Natural Philosophy Seriously.Andrew Cunningham - 1991 - History of Science 29 (86):377-392.
  • Looking Beyond History: The Optics of German Anthropology and the Critique of Humanism.A. Zimmerman - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (3):385-411.
    Late nineteenth-century German anthropology had to compete for intellectual legitimacy with the established academic humanities (Geisteswissenschaften), above all history. Whereas humanists interpreted literary documents to create narratives about great civilizations, anthropologists represented and viewed objects, such as skulls or artifacts, to create what they regarded as natural scientific knowledge about so-called 'natural peoples'-colonized societies of Africa, the Pacific, and the Americas. Anthropologists thus invoked a venerable tradition that presented looking at objects as a more certain source of knowledge than reading (...)
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  • No Mere Dream: Material Culture and Electrical Imagination in Late Victorian Britain.Iwan Rhys Morus - 2015 - Centaurus 57 (3):173-191.
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  • Electricity and Imagination: Post-Romantic Electrified Experience and the Gendered Body. An Introduction.Koen Vermeir - 2015 - Centaurus 57 (3):131-155.
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  • Florentine Anatomical Models and the Challenge of Medical Authority in Late-Eighteenth-Century Vienna.Anna Maerker - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (3):730-740.
    This paper investigates the reception of a set of Florentine anatomical wax models on display at the medico-surgical academy Josephinum in late-eighteenth-century Vienna. Celebrated in Florence as tools of public enlightenment, in the Habsburg capital the models were criticised by physicians, who regarded the Josephinum and its surgeons as a threat to their medical authority. The controversy surrounding these models from the empire’s periphery temporarily destabilised the relationship between surgeons and physicians in the Austrian capital. The debate on the utility (...)
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  • Florentine Anatomical Models and the Challenge of Medical Authority in Late-Eighteenth-Century Vienna.Anna Maerker - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (3):730-740.
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  • John Flamsteed's Letter Concerning the Natural Causes of Earthquakes.Frances Willmoth - 1987 - Annals of Science 44 (1):23-70.
    A letter in which astronomer John Flamsteed expounded his unusual views about the causes of earthquakes survives in a number of drafts and copies. Though it was compiled in response to shocks felt in England in 1692 and Sicily in 1693, its relationship to the wide range of comparable theories current in the later seventeenth century must be considered. Flamsteed's suggestion that an ‘earthquake’ might be an explosion in the air was linked with contemporary thinking about the roles of sulphur (...)
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  • Newton in the Nursery: Tom Telescope and the Philosophy of Tops and Balls, 1761–1838.J. A. Secord - 1985 - History of Science 23 (2):127-151.
  • Seeing Through the Scholium: Religion and Reading Newton in the Eighteenth Century.Larry Stewart - 1996 - History of Science 34 (2):123-165.
  • Doctrine And Use:Newton's "Gift Of Teaching".Michael Ben-Chaim - 1998 - History of Science 36 (3):269-298.
  • The History of Science and the History of Microscopy.Ann La Berge - 1999 - Perspectives on Science 7 (1):111-142.
  • The History of Science and the History of Microscopy.Ann Elizabeth Fowler La Berge - 1999 - Perspectives on Science 7 (1):111-142.