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  1. De-Emphasizing Competition in Organized Youth Sport: Misdirected Reforms and Misled Children.Cesar R. Torres & Peter F. Hager - 2007 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 34 (2):194-210.
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  • Political Theory and Public Opinion Against Democratic Restraint.Alice Baderin - 2016 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 15 (3):209-233.
    How should political theorists go about their work if they are democrats? Given their democratic commitments, should they develop theories that are responsive to the views and concerns of their fellow citizens at large? Is there a balance to be struck, within political theory, between truth seeking and democratic responsiveness? The article addresses this question about the relationship between political theory, public opinion and democracy. I criticize the way in which some political theorists have appealed to the value of democratic (...)
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  • Bend It Like Beckham! The Ethics of Genetically Testing Children for Athletic Potential.Silvia Camporesi - 2013 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (2):175-185.
    The recent boom of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests, aimed at measuring children?s athletic potential, is the latest wave in the ?pre-professionalization? of children that has characterized, especially but not exclusively, the USA in the last 15 years or so. In this paper, I analyse the use of DTC genetic tests, sometimes coupled with more traditional methods of ?talent scouting?, to assess a child?s predisposition to athletic performance. I first discuss the scientific evidence at the basis of these tests, and the (...)
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  • Virtue and Voluntarism.James Montmarquet - 2008 - Synthese 161 (3):393 - 402.
    My aim here is to characterize a certain type of ‘virtue approach’ to questions of responsibility for belief; then to explore the extent to which this is helpful with respect to one fundamental puzzle raised by the claims that we have, and that we do not have, voluntary control over our beliefs; and then ultimately to attempt a more exact statement of doxastic responsibility and, with it a plausible statement of ‘weak doxastic voluntarism.’.
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  • Autonomy and Vulnerability: On Just Relations Between Adults and Children.Sigal R. Benporath - 2003 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 37 (1):127–145.
  • Children and Dangerous Sport and Recreation.J. S. Russell - 2007 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 34 (2):176-193.
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  • Economic Theories of Democratic Legitimacy and the Normative Role of an Ideal Consensus.C. S. King - 2013 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 12 (2):156-178.
    Economic theories of democratic legitimacy (discussed here as minimalist theories) have criticized deliberative accounts of democratic legitimacy on the grounds that they do not represent a practical possibility and that they create conditions that make actual democracies worse. It is not simply that they represent the wrong ideal. Rather, they are too idealistic – failing to show proper regard for the cognitive and moral limitations of persons and the depth of disagreement in democratic society. This article aims to show (1) (...)
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  • Global Public Power: Thesubjectof Principles of Global Political Legitimacy.Andrew Hurrell & Terry Macdonald - 2012 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (5):553-571.
    This paper elaborates the concept of global public power as the subject of principles of political legitimacy in global politics, and defends it through a critical comparison with other concepts widely employed to depict this regulative subject: states, global basic structure, and global governance. The goal underlying this argument is to bring some greater unity and integration to conceptual understandings of the subject of principles of political legitimacy within analyses of global politics, and in doing so to frame a broader (...)
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  • ‘Mutual Obligation’ and ‘New Deal’: Illegitimate and Unjustified?Jeremy Moss - 2006 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (1):87-104.
    It is now commonplace for governments in Western countries to require the unemployed to work in exchange for their unemployment benefits. In this article I raise some serious doubts about the most promising and philosophically interesting defence of this argument, which relies on the 'principle of reciprocity'. I argue that it is seriously unclear whether the obligations imposed on welfare claimants by 'workfare' schemes are legitimate and justified according to the principle of reciprocity. I do this by reconstructing the arguments (...)
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  • The Idea of a Legitimate State.David Copp - 1999 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 28 (1):3-45.
    A legitimate state would have a right to rule. The problem is to understand, first, precisely what this right amounts to, and second, under what conditions a state would have it. According to the traditional account, the legitimacy of a state is to be explained in terms of its subjects’ obligation to obey the law. I argue that this account is inadequate. I propose that the legitimacy of a state would consist in its having a bundle of rights of various (...)
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