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  1. Conditions of Global Health Crisis Decision-Making—An Ethical Analysis.Elizabeth Fenton & Kata Chillag - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-8.
    The circumstances of a public health emergency shape reasoning and decision-making in ways that deviate from routine circumstances, where adherence to established values, principles, and methodologies is expected. Understanding what drives these deviations is critical to assessing their ethical consequences. In this paper we describe four conditions that influence decision-making during PHEs, in particular regarding the deployment and conduct of research on experimental or novel biomedical interventions. These four conditions are politicization, urgency, uncertainty, and fear. We argue that taken together (...)
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  • Challenges to Biobanking in LMICs During COVID-19: Time to Reconceptualise Research Ethics Guidance for Pandemics and Public Health Emergencies?Shenuka Singh, Rosemary Jean Cadigan & Keymanthri Moodley - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-106858.
    Biobanking can promote valuable health research that may lead to significant societal benefits. However, collecting, storing and sharing human samples and data for research purposes present numerous ethical challenges. These challenges are exacerbated when the biobanking efforts aim to facilitate research on public health emergencies and include the sharing of samples and data between low/middle-income countries and high-income countries. In this article, we explore ethical challenges for COVID-19 biobanking, offering examples from two past infectious disease outbreaks in LMICs where biobanking (...)
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  • Ethics Preparedness: Facilitating Ethics Review During Outbreaks - Recommendations From an Expert Panel.Abha Saxena, Peter Horby, John Amuasi, Nic Aagaard, Johannes Köhler, Ehsan Shamsi Gooshki, Emmanuelle Denis, Andreas A. Reis & Raffaella Ravinetto - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):29.
    Ensuring that countries have adequate research capacities is essential for an effective and efficient response to infectious disease outbreaks. The need for ethical principles and values embodied in international research ethics guidelines to be upheld during public health emergencies is widely recognized. Public health officials, researchers and other concerned stakeholders also have to carefully balance time and resources allocated to immediate treatment and control activities, with an approach that integrates research as part of the outbreak response. Under such circumstances, research (...)
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  • Familiar Ethical Issues Amplified: How Members of Research Ethics Committees Describe Ethical Distinctions Between Disaster and Non-Disaster Research.Catherine M. Tansey, James Anderson, Renaud F. Boulanger, Lisa Eckenwiler, John Pringle, Lisa Schwartz & Matthew Hunt - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):44.
    The conduct of research in settings affected by disasters such as hurricanes, floods and earthquakes is challenging, particularly when infrastructures and resources were already limited pre-disaster. However, since post-disaster research is essential to the improvement of the humanitarian response, it is important that adequate research ethics oversight be available. We aim to answer the following questions: 1) what do research ethics committee members who have reviewed research protocols to be conducted following disasters in low- and middle-income countries perceive as the (...)
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  • Research and Global Health Emergencies: On the Essential Role of Best Practice.Nayha Sethi - 2018 - Public Health Ethics 11 (3):237-250.
    This article addresses an important, overlooked regulatory challenge during global health emergencies. It provides novel insights into how, and why, best practice can support decision makers in interpreting and implementing key guidance on conducting research during GHEs. The ability to conduct research before, during and after such events is crucial. The recent West-African Ebola outbreaks and the Zika virus have highlighted considerable room for improvement in meeting the imperative to research and rapidly develop effective therapies. A means of effectively capturing (...)
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  • Erratum To: Ethics Review of Studies During Public Health Emergencies - the Experience of the WHO Ethics Review Committee During the Ebola Virus Disease Epidemic.Emilie Alirol, Annette C. Kuesel, Maria Magdalena Guraiib, Vânia de la Fuente-Núñez, Abha Saxena & Melba F. Gomes - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):45.
    Background Between 2013 and 2016, West Africa experienced the largest ever outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease. In the absence of registered treatments or vaccines to control this lethal disease, the World Health Organization coordinated and supported research to expedite identification of interventions that could control the outbreak and improve future control efforts. Consequently, the World Health Organization Research Ethics Review Committee was heavily involved in reviews and ethics discussions. It reviewed 24 new and 22 amended protocols for research studies including (...)
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  • Ethics Review of Studies During Public Health Emergencies - the Experience of the WHO Ethics Review Committee During the Ebola Virus Disease Epidemic.Emilie Alirol, Annette C. Kuesel, Maria Magdalena Guraiib, Vânia Dela Fuente-Núñez, Abha Saxena & Melba F. Gomes - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):43.
    Between 2013 and 2016, West Africa experienced the largest ever outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease. In the absence of registered treatments or vaccines to control this lethal disease, the World Health Organization coordinated and supported research to expedite identification of interventions that could control the outbreak and improve future control efforts. Consequently, the World Health Organization Research Ethics Review Committee was heavily involved in reviews and ethics discussions. It reviewed 24 new and 22 amended protocols for research studies including interventional (...)
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