Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Evolutionary Mismatch in Mating.Cari D. Goetz, Elizabeth G. Pillsworth, David M. Buss & Daniel Conroy-Beam - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Weirdest People in the World?Joseph Henrich, Steven J. Heine & Ara Norenzayan - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):61-83.
    Behavioral scientists routinely publish broad claims about human psychology and behavior in the world's top journals based on samples drawn entirely from Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic (WEIRD) societies. Researchers assume that either there is little variation across human populations, or that these are as representative of the species as any other population. Are these assumptions justified? Here, our review of the comparative database from across the behavioral sciences suggests both that there is substantial variability in experimental results across (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   351 citations  
  • The Return of the "Tabula Rasa". [REVIEW]Alex Rosenberg - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (2):476 - 497.
    Thought in a Hostile World1 has four ostensible aims: …[1] to develop and vindicate a set of analytical tools for thinking about cognition and its evolution… [2] to develop a substantive theory of the evolution of human uniqueness… [3] to explore, from this evolutionary perspective, the relationship between folk psychology and an integrated scientific conception of human cognition… [4] to develop a critique of, and an alternative to, nativist, modular versions of evolutionary psychology (p. viii). Of these four aims, the (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Evolved but Not Fixed: A Life History Account of Gender Roles and Gender Inequality.Nan Zhu & Lei Chang - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Gender Differences in the Perceptions of Genuine and Simulated Laughter and Amused Facial Expressions.G. McKeown, I. Sneddon & W. Curran - 2015 - Emotion Review 7 (1):30-38.
  • WEIRD Languages Have Misled Us, Too.Asifa Majid & Stephen C. Levinson - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):103-103.
    The linguistic and cognitive sciences have severely underestimated the degree of linguistic diversity in the world. Part of the reason for this is that we have projected assumptions based on English and familiar languages onto the rest. We focus on some distortions this has introduced, especially in the study of semantics.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Rethinking Innovative Designs to Further Test Parasite-Stress Theory.Ayse K. Uskul - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):93-94.
    Fincher & Thornhill's (F&T's) parasite-stress theory of sociality is supported largely by correlational evidence; its persuasiveness would increase significantly via lab and natural experiments and demonstrations of its mediating role. How the theory is linked to other approaches to group differences in psychological differences and to production and dissemination of cultural ideas and practices, need further clarification. So does the theory's view on the possible reduction of negative group interactions.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Adaptive Developmental Plasticity Might Not Contribute Much to the Adaptiveness of Reproductive Strategies.Lars Penke - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):38-39.
    Del Giudice's model belongs among those that highlight the role of adaptive developmental plasticity in human reproductive strategies; but at least three other forms of evolutionary adaptation also influence reproductive behavior. Similar to earlier models, the existing evidence suggests that Del Giudice's hypothesized effects are rather weak. In particular, adult attachment styles are hardly predictive of outcomes visible to natural selection.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Human Reproductive Strategies: An Emerging Synthesis?Marco Del Giudice - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):45-67.
    In the first part of this response, commentators' critiques to the target article are reviewed and addressed. The main discussion topics are the role of attachment in developmental plasticity; the relationship between attachment, mating, and reproductive strategies; the existence, magnitude, and developmental timing of sex differences in attachment; the adaptiveness of insecure styles; and the neurobiology of attachment and reproduction. The model's assumptions are clarified, and a number of methodological issues that can confound the interpretation of research findings are examined. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Attachment, Reproduction, and Life History Trade-Offs: A Broader View of Human Mating.Lane Beckes & Jeffry A. Simpson - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):23-24.
    In this commentary, we attempt to broaden thinking and dialogue about how our ancestral past might have affected attachment and reproductive strategies. We highlight the theoretical benefits of formulating specific predictions of how different sources of stress might impact attachment and reproductive strategies differently, and we integrate some of these ideas with another recent evolutionary model of human mating.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Why Do People Become Modern? A Darwinian Explanation.Peter J. Richerson - unknown
    MOST MODERN PEOPLE think it is obvious why people become modern. For them, a more interesting and important puzzle is why some people fail to embrace modern ideas. Why do people in traditional societies often seem unable or unwilling to aspire to a better life for themselves and their children? Why do they fail to see the benefi ts of education, equal rights, democracy, and a rational approach to decisionmaking? What is the glue that makes them adhere to superstition, religion, (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Influences on Communication About Reproduction: The Cultural Evolution of Low Fertility.Peter J. Richersonb - unknown
    The cultural norms of traditional societies encourage behavior that is consistent with maximizing reproductive success but those of modern post-demographic transition societies do not. Newson et al (2005) proposed that this might be because interaction between kin is relatively less frequent in modern social networks. Assuming that people’s evaluations of reproductive decisions are influenced by a desire to increase their inclusive fitness, they will be inclined to prefer their kin to make fitness-enhancing choices. Such a preference will encourage the emergence (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Parasite-Stress, Cultures of Honor, and the Emergence of Gender Bias in Purity Norms.Joseph A. Vandello & Vanessa E. Hettinger - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):95-96.
    Of the many far-reaching implications of Fincher & Thornhill's (F&T's) theory, we focus on the consequences of parasite stress for mating strategies, marriage, and the differing roles and restrictions for men and women. In particular, we explain how examination of cultures of honor can provide a theoretical bridge between effects of parasite stress and disproportionate emphasis on female purity.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The High Sex Ratio in China: What Do the Chinese Think?C. Zhou, X. L. Wang, W. J. Zheng, X. D. Zhou, L. Li & T. Hesketh - 2012 - Journal of Biosocial Science 44 (1):121-125.
  • Early Environments Shape Neuropeptide Function: The Case of Oxytocin and Vasopressin.Adi Perry-Paldi, Gilad Hirschberger, Ruth Feldman, Orna Zagoory-Sharon, Shira Buchris Bazak & Tsachi Ein-Dor - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Morning After the Night Before.Anne Campbell - 2008 - Human Nature 19 (2):157-173.
    Benefits to females of short-term mating have recently been identified, and it has been suggested that women have evolved adaptations for this strategy. One piece of evidence supporting such a female adaptation would be that women find the experience of a one-night stand as affectively positive as men. Individuals (N = 1,743) who had experienced a one-night stand were asked to rate aspects of their “morning after” feelings (six positive and six negative). Women were significantly more negative and less positive (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • How Willing Are You to Accept Sexual Requests From Slightly Unattractive to Exceptionally Attractive Imagined Requestors?Achim Schützwohl, Amrei Fuchs, William F. McKibbin & Todd K. Shackelford - 2009 - Human Nature 20 (3):282-293.
    In their classic study of differences in mating strategies, Clark and Hatfield (1989, Journal of Psychology and Human Sexuality, 2, 39–54) found that men and women demonstrated a striking difference in interest in casual sex. The current study examined the role of an imagined requestor’s physical attractiveness (slightly unattractive, moderately attractive, and exceptionally attractive) on men’s and women’s willingness to accept three different requests (go out, come to apartment, go to bed) as reflected in answers to a questionnaire. We tested (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark