Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Nudges and Other Moral Technologies in the Context of Power: Assigning and Accepting Responsibility.Mark Alfano & Philip Robichaud - forthcoming - In David Boonin (ed.), Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. Palgrave.
    Strawson argues that we should understand moral responsibility in terms of our practices of holding responsible and taking responsibility. The former covers what is commonly referred to as backward-looking responsibility , while the latter covers what is commonly referred to as forward-looking responsibility . We consider new technologies and interventions that facilitate assignment of responsibility. Assigning responsibility is best understood as the second- or third-personal analogue of taking responsibility. It establishes forward-looking responsibility. But unlike taking responsibility, it establishes forward-looking responsibility (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Getting People Into Work: What Can Justify Mandatory Activation of Welfare Recipients?Anders Molander & Gaute Torsvik - 2015 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (4):373-392.
    So-called activation policies aiming at bringing jobless people into work have been a central component of welfare reforms across OECD countries during the last decades. Such policies combine restrictive and enabling programs, but their characteristic feature is that enabling programs are also mandatory, and non-compliers are sanctioned. There are four main arguments that can be used to defend mandatory activation of benefit recipients. We label them efficiency, sustainability, paternalism, and justice. Each argument is analysed in turn. First we clarify which (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Normative Responsibilities: Structure and Sources.Gunnar Björnsson & Bengt Brülde - 2017 - In Kristien Hens, Dorothee Horstkötter & Daniela Cutas (eds.), Parental Responsibility in the Context of Neuroscience and Genetics. Springer. pp. 13–33.
    Attributions of what we shall call normative responsibilities play a central role in everyday moral thinking. It is commonly thought, for example, that parents are responsible for the wellbeing of their children, and that this has important normative consequences. Depending on context, it might mean that parents are morally required to bring their children to the doctor, feed them well, attend to their emotional needs, or to see to it that someone else does. Similarly, it is sometimes argued that countries (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • More Than Anyone Bargained For: Beyond the Welfare Contract.Robert E. Goodin - 1998 - Ethics and International Affairs 12:141–158.
    Rather than base social welfare policies on contractual bargaining, policies should focus on the duties the strong members of society have toward the weak: the poor should clearly receive more, and the rich pay more, than either group has bargained for.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Property and the Creation of Value.Dan Moller - 2017 - Economics and Philosophy 33 (1):1-23.
  • What's Not Wrong with Libertarianism: Reply to Friedman.Tom G. Palmer - 1998 - Critical Review 12 (3):337-358.
    Abstract In his critique of modern libertarian thinking, Jeffrey Friedman (1997) argues that libertarian moral theory makes social science irrelevant. However, if its moral claims are hypothetical rather than categorical imperatives, then economics, history, sociology, and other disciplines play a central role in libertarian thought. Limitations on human knowledge necessitate abstractly formulated rules, among which are claims of rights. Further, Friedman's remarks on freedom rest on an erroneous understanding of the role of definitions in philosophy, and his characterization of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Mark Sagoff 's Price, Principle, and the Environment: Two Comments.Bryan Norton, Paul B. Thompson, David Schmidtz, Elizabeth Willott & Mark Sagoff - 2006 - Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (3):337 – 372.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • `Welfare Dependence': The Power of a Concept.Marion Smiley - 2001 - Thesis Eleven (64):21-38.
    This essay argues that the concept of dependence now invoked in noramtive discussions of the welfare state is both incoherent and biased as a result of its conflation of four distinctly different notions of dependence, ranging from the purely causal to that associated with lower class identities.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Moral and Economic Critique of the New Property-Owning Democrats: On Behalf of a Rawlsian Welfare State.Kevin Vallier - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (2):283-304.
    Property-owning democracies combine the regulative and redistributive functions of the welfare state with the governmental aim of ensuring that wealth and capital are widely dispersed. John Rawls, political philosophy’s most famous property-owning democrat, argued that property-owning democracy was one of two regime types that best realized his two principles of justice, though he was notoriously vague about how a property-owning democracy’s institutions are meant to realize his principles. To compensate for this deficiency, a number of Rawlsian political philosophers have tried (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Public Insurance and Equality: From Redistribution to Relation.Xavier Landes & Pierre-Yves Néron - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (2):137-154.
    Public insurance is commonly assimilated with redistributive tools mobilized by the welfare state in the pursuit of an egalitarian ideal. This view contains some truth, since the result of insurance, at a given moment, is the redistribution of resources from the lucky to unlucky. However, Joseph Heath considers that the principle of efficiency provides a better normative explanation and justification of public insurance than the egalitarian account. According to this view, the fact that the state is involved in the provision (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark