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  1. Color Improves Speed of Processing But Not Perception in a Motion Illusion.Carolyn J. Perry & Mazyar Fallah - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  • Echoes.Casey O'Callaghan - 2007 - The Monist 90 (3):403-414.
    Echo experiences are illusory experiences of ordinary primary sounds. Just as there is no new object that we see at the surface of a mirror, there is no new sound that we hear at a reflecting surface. The sound that we hear as an echo just is the original primary sound, though its perception involves illusions of place, time, and qualities. The case of echoes need not force us to adopt a conception according to which sounds are persisting object-like particulars (...)
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  • Some Puzzling Findings in Multiple Object Tracking (MOT): II. Inhibition of Moving Nontargets.Zenon Pylyshyn - manuscript
    We present three studies examining whether multiple-object tracking (MOT) benefits from the active inhibition of nontargets, as proposed in (Pylyshyn, 2004). Using a probedot technique, the first study showed poorer probe detection on nontargets than on either the targets being tracked or in the empty space between objects. The second study used a matching nontracking task to control for possible masking of probes, independent of target tracking. The third study examined how localized the inhibition is to individual nontargets. The result (...)
     
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  • Some Puzzling Findings in Multiple Object Tracking: I. Tracking Without Keeping Track of Object Identities.Zenon Pylyshyn - manuscript
    The task of tracking a small number (about four or five) visual targets within a larger set of identical items, each of which moves randomly and independently, has been used extensively to study object-based attention. Analysis of this multiple object tracking (MOT) task shows that it logically entails solving the correspondence problem for each target over time, and thus that the individuality of each of the targets must be tracked. This suggests that when successfully tracking objects, observers must also keep (...)
     
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  • Visual Indexes and Nonconceptual Reference.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - manuscript
  • Stroboscopic Vision When Interacting With Multiple Moving Objects: Perturbation Is Not the Same as Elimination.Simon J. Bennett, Spencer J. Hayes & Makoto Uji - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Automatic Lexical Access in Visual Modality: Eye-Tracking Evidence.Ekaterina Stupina, Andriy Myachykov & Yury Shtyrov - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Functional Connectivity Supporting the Selective Maintenance of Feature-Location Binding in Visual Working Memory.Sachiko Takahama & Jun Saiki - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • The Global Properties of Objects Play the Main Role in Facilitating Multiple Object Tracking Performance.Liuqing Wei, Xuemin Zhang, Zhen Li, Bin Hu & Xiaowei Li - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Indexing and the Object Concept: Developing `What' and `Where' Systems.Alan M. Leslie, Fei Xu, Patrice D. Tremoulet & Brian J. Scholl - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (1):10-18.
  • Representation, Space and Hollywood Squares: Looking at Things That Aren't There Anymore.Daniel C. Richardson & Michael J. Spivey - 2000 - Cognition 76 (3):269-295.
  • Visual Indexes, Preconceptual Objects, and Situated Vision.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 2001 - Cognition 80 (1-2):127-158.
    This paper argues that a theory of situated vision, suited for the dual purposes of object recognition and the control of action, will have to provide something more than a system that constructs a conceptual representation from visual stimuli: it will also need to provide a special kind of direct (preconceptual, unmediated) connection between elements of a visual representation and certain elements in the world. Like natural language demonstratives (such as `this' or `that') this direct connection allows entities to be (...)
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  • Infants' Knowledge of Objects: Beyond Object Files and Object Tracking.Susan Carey & Fei Xu - 2001 - Cognition 80 (1-2):179-213.
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  • What is a Visual Object? Evidence From Target Merging in Multiple Object Tracking.Brian J. Scholla - 2001 - Cognition 80 (1-2):159-177.
    The notion that visual attention can operate over visual objects in addition to spatial locations has recently received much empirical support, but there has been relatively little empirical consideration of what can count as an `object' in the ®rst place. We have investi- gated this question in the context of the multiple object tracking paradigm, in which subjects must track a number of independently and unpredictably moving identical items in a ®eld of identical distractors. What types of feature clusters can (...)
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  • Objects and Attention: The State of the Art.Brian J. Scholl - 2001 - Cognition 80 (1-2):1-46.
  • Situating Vision in the World.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (5):197-207.
  • Large Number Discrimination in 6-Month-Old Infants.Fei Xu & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2000 - Cognition 74 (1):1-11.
    Six-month-old infants discriminate between large sets of objects on the basis of numerosity when other extraneous variables are controlled, provided that the sets to be discriminated differ by a large ratio (8 vs. 16 but not 8 vs. 12). The capacities to represent approximate numerosity found in adult animals and humans evidently develop in human infants prior to language and symbolic counting.
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  • The Emergence of Kind Concepts: A Rejoinder to Needham and Baillargeon.Fei Xu & Susan Carey - 2000 - Cognition 74 (3):285-301.
  • Perception of Features and Perception of Objects.Daniel Burnston & Jonathan Cohen - 2012 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):283-314.
    There is a long and distinguished tradition in philosophy and psychology according to which the mind’s fundamental, foundational connection to the world is made by connecting perceptually to features of objects. On this picture, which we’ll call feature prioritarianism, minds like ours first make contact with the colors, shapes, and sizes of distal items, and then, only on the basis of the representations so obtained, build up representations of the objects that bear these features. The feature priority view maintains, then, (...)
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  • Against the Speaker-Intention Theory of Demonstratives.Christopher Gauker - 2019 - Linguistics and Philosophy 42 (2):109-129.
    It is commonly supposed that an utterance of a demonstrative, such as “that”, refers to a given object only if the speaker intends it to refer to that object. This paper poses three challenges to this theory. First, the theory threatens to beg the question by defining the content of the speaker’s intention in terms of reference. Second, the theory makes psychologically implausible demands on the speaker. Third, the theory entails that there can be no demonstratives in thought.
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  • Occlusion Is Hard: Comparing Predictive Reaching for Visible and Hidden Objects in Infants and Adults.Susan Hespos, Gustaf Gredebäck, Claes von Hofsten & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (8):1483-1502.
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  • Individuation of Objects and Events: A Developmental Study.Laura Wagner & Susan Carey - 2003 - Cognition 90 (2):163-191.
  • Object Perception: Vision and Audition.Casey O’Callaghan - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (4):803-829.
    Vision has been the primary focus of naturalistic philosophical research concerning perception and perceptual experience. Guided by visual experience and vision science, many philosophers have focused upon theoretical issues dealing with the perception of objects. Recently, however, hearing researchers have discussed auditory objects. I present the case for object perception in vision, and argue that an analog of object perception occurs in auditory perception. I propose a notion of an auditory object that is stronger than just that of an intentional (...)
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  • Core Systems of Number.Stanislas Dehaene, Elizabeth Spelke & Lisa Feigenson - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (7):307-314.
  • Characterizing Attention with Predictive Network Models.M. D. Rosenberg, E. S. Finn, D. Scheinost, R. T. Constable & M. M. Chun - 2017 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 21 (4):290-302.
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  • Additivity of Feature-Based and Symmetry-Based Grouping Effects in Multiple Object Tracking.Chundi Wang, Xuemin Zhang, Yongna Li & Chuang Lyu - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • The Origins of Belief Representation: Monkeys Fail to Automatically Represent Others’ Beliefs.Alia Martin & Laurie R. Santos - 2014 - Cognition 130 (3):300-308.
  • Establishing Object Correspondence Across Eye Movements: Flexible Use of Spatiotemporal and Surface Feature Information.Ashleigh M. Richard, Steven J. Luck & Andrew Hollingworth - 2008 - Cognition 109 (1):66-88.
  • Sortal Concepts, Object Individuation, and Language.Fei Xu - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (9):400-406.
  • Belief Files in Theory of Mind Reasoning.Ágnes Kovács - 2016 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (2):509-527.
    Humans seem to readily track their conspecifics’ mental states, such as their goals and beliefs from early infancy. However, the underlying cognitive architecture that enables such powerful abilities remains unclear. Here I will propose that a basic representational structure, the belief file, could provide the foundation for efficiently encoding, and updating information about, others’ beliefs in online social interactions. I will discuss the representational possibilities offered by the belief file and the ways in which the repertoire of mental state reasoning (...)
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  • Taking a New Look at Looking at Nothing.Fernanda Ferreira, Jens Apel & John M. Henderson - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (11):405-410.
  • Why the Verbal Counting Principles Are Constructed Out of Representations of Small Sets of Individuals: A Reply to Gallistel.Mathieu Le Corre & Susan Carey - 2008 - Cognition 107 (2):650-662.
  • Numerical Architecture.Eric Mandelbaum - 2013 - Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (1):367-386.
    The idea that there is a “Number Sense” (Dehaene, 1997) or “Core Knowledge” of number ensconced in a modular processing system (Carey, 2009) has gained popularity as the study of numerical cognition has matured. However, these claims are generally made with little, if any, detailed examination of which modular properties are instantiated in numerical processing. In this article, I aim to rectify this situation by detailing the modular properties on display in numerical cognitive processing. In the process, I review literature (...)
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  • Object Persistence in Philosophy and Psychology.Brian J. Scholl - 2007 - Mind and Language 22 (5):563–591.
    What makes an object the same persisting individual over time? Philosophers and psychologists have both grappled with this question, but from different perspectives—philosophers conceptually analyzing the criteria for object persistence, and psychologists exploring the mental mechanisms that lead us to experience the world in terms of persisting objects. It is striking that the same themes populate explorations of persistence in these two very different fields—e.g. the roles of spatiotemporal continuity, persistence through property change, and cohesion violations. Such similarities may reflect (...)
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  • Attentional Resources in Visual Tracking Through Occlusion: The High-Beams Effect.Jonathan I. Flombaum, Brian J. Scholl & Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 2008 - Cognition 107 (3):904-931.
  • The Capacity of Visual Short-Term Memory Within and Between Hemifields.Jean-François Delvenne - 2005 - Cognition 96 (3):B79-B88.
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  • Feature Binding in Visual Working Memory Evaluated by Type Identification Paradigm.Jun Saiki & Hirofumi Miyatsuji - 2007 - Cognition 102 (1):49-83.
  • Why and How Not to Be a Sortalist About Thought.Rachel Goodman - 2012 - Philosophical Perspectives 26 (1):77-112.
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  • Swapping or Dropping? Electrophysiological Measures of Difficulty During Multiple Object Tracking.Trafton Drew, Todd S. Horowitz & Edward K. Vogel - 2013 - Cognition 126 (2):213-223.
  • Perceiving Expressions of Emotion: What Evidence Could Bear on Questions About Perceptual Experience of Mental States?Stephen A. Butterfill - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 36:438-451.
  • The Significance of Names.Robin Jeshion - 2009 - Mind and Language 24 (4):370-403.
    As a class of terms and mental representations, proper names and mental names possess an important function that outstrips their semantic and psycho-semantic functions as common, rigid devices of direct reference and singular mental representations of their referents, respectively. They also function as abstract linguistic markers that signal and underscore their referents' individuality. I promote this thesis to explain why we give proper names to certain particulars, but not others; to account for the transfer of singular thought via communication with (...)
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