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  1. The Plain Man's Guide to Probability. [REVIEW]Colin Howson - 1972 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 23 (2):157-170.
  • SAD Computers and Two Versions of the Church–Turing Thesis.Tim Button - 2009 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (4):765-792.
    Recent work on hypercomputation has raised new objections against the Church–Turing Thesis. In this paper, I focus on the challenge posed by a particular kind of hypercomputer, namely, SAD computers. I first consider deterministic and probabilistic barriers to the physical possibility of SAD computation. These suggest several ways to defend a Physical version of the Church–Turing Thesis. I then argue against Hogarth's analogy between non-Turing computability and non-Euclidean geometry, showing that it is a non-sequitur. I conclude that the Effective version (...)
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  • The Significance Test Controversy. [REVIEW]Ronald N. Giere - 1972 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 23 (2):170-181.
  • De Finetti, Countable Additivity, Consistency and Coherence.Colin Howson - 2008 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (1):1-23.
    Many people believe that there is a Dutch Book argument establishing that the principle of countable additivity is a condition of coherence. De Finetti himself did not, but for reasons that are at first sight perplexing. I show that he rejected countable additivity, and hence the Dutch Book argument for it, because countable additivity conflicted with intuitive principles about the scope of authentic consistency constraints. These he often claimed were logical in nature, but he never attempted to relate this idea (...)
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  • Scott Sentences for Certain Groups.Julia F. Knight & Vikram Saraph - 2018 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 57 (3-4):453-472.
    We give Scott sentences for certain computable groups, and we use index set calculations as a way of checking that our Scott sentences are as simple as possible. We consider finitely generated groups and torsion-free abelian groups of finite rank. For both kinds of groups, the computable ones all have computable \ Scott sentences. Sometimes we can do better. In fact, the computable finitely generated groups that we have studied all have Scott sentences that are “computable d-\” sentence and a (...)
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  • On Characterizability in Lω1ω0.Per Lindström - 1966 - Theoria 32 (3):165-171.
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