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  1. Explicit Nomenclature and Classification in Pliny’s Natural History XXXII.Andrea Guasparri - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (3):347-353.
    Pliny’s Natural History has been traditionally considered as the unoriginal work of an uncritical compiler. This has also been held to be true of the “biological” books, especially when one compares them with the works of Aristotle, one of Pliny’s main authorities in this domain. Aristotle’s achievements would be remarkable, especially in the field of classification, of which the philosopher is traditionally celebrated as the scientific father. However, by carefully reading HN XXXII it is possible to find a certain “taxonomic” (...)
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  • Social-Ecological Theory of Maximization: Basic Concepts and Two Initial Models.Ulysses Paulino Albuquerque, Patricia Muniz de Medeiros, Washington Soares Ferreira Júnior, Taline Cristina da Silva, Rafael Ricardo Vasconcelos da Silva & Thiago Gonçalves-Souza - 2019 - Biological Theory 14 (2):73-85.
    Efforts have been dedicated to the understanding of social-ecological systems, an important focus in ethnobiological studies. In particular, ethnobiological investigations have found evidence and tested hypotheses over the last 30 years on the interactions between human groups and their environments, generating the need to formulate a theory for such systems. In this article, we propose the social-ecological theory of maximization to explain the construction and functioning of these systems over time, encompassing hypotheses and evidence from previous ethnobiological studies. In proposing (...)
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  • The Conceptual Critique of Innateness.Stefan Linquist - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (5):e12492.
    It is widely recognized that the innate versus acquired distinction is a false dichotomy. Yet many scientists continue to describe certain traits as “innate” and take this to imply that those traits are not acquired, or “unlearned.” This article asks what cognitive role, if any, the concept of innateness should play in the psychological and behavioural sciences. I consider three arguments for eliminating innateness from scientific discourse. First, the classification of a trait as innate is thought to discourage empirical research (...)
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