Switch to: References

Citations of:

Platonic Causes

Phronesis 43 (2):114-132 (1998)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Finding Ernst Mayr’s Plato.Jack Powers - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (4b):714-723.
    Many biologists have accepted Ernst Mayr’s claim that evolutionary biology undermined an essentialist or typological view of species that had its roots in Platonic philosophy. However, Mayr has been accused of failing to support with textual evidence his attributions to Plato of these sorts of views about biology. Contemporary work in history and philosophy of biology often seems to take onboard Mayr’s account of Plato’s view of species. This paper seeks to provide a critical account of putative inconsistencies between an (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • ᾽Εκπύρωσις and the Goodness of God in Cleanthes.Ricardo Salles - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (1):56 - 78.
    The ἐκπύρωσις, or world's conflagration, followed by the restoration of an identical world seems to go against the rationality of the Stoic god. The aim of this paper is to show that Cleanthes, the second head of the School, can avoid this paradox. According to Cleanthes, the conflagration is an inevitable side-effect of the necessary means used by god to sustain the world. Given that this side-effect is contrary to god's sustaining activity, but unavoidable, god's rationality requires the restoration of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Teleology, Causation and the Atlas Motif in Plato's Phaedo.Daniel Vazquez - 2020 - Schole 14 (1):82-103.
    In this paper, I propose a new reading of Phaedo 99b6-d2. My main thesis is that in 99c6-9, Socrates does not refer to the teleological αἰτία but to the αἰτία that will be provided by a stronger ‘Atlas’ (99c4-5). This means that the passage offers no evidence that Socrates abandons teleology or modifies his views about it. He acknowledges, instead, that he could not find or learn any αἰτία stronger than the teleological one. This, I suggest, allows an interpretation of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Aristotle’s Criticism of the Platonic Forms as Causes in De Generatione Et Corruptione II 9. A Reading Based on Philoponus’ Exegesis.Melina G. Mouzala - 2016 - Peitho 7 (1):123-148.
    In the De Generatione et Corruptione II 9, Aristotle aims to achieve the confirmation of his theory of the necessity of the efficient cause. In this chapter he sets out his criticism on the one hand of those who wrongly attributed the efficient cause to other kinds of causality and on the other, of those who ignored the efficient cause. More specifically Aristotle divides all preceding theories which attempted to explain generation and corruption into two groups: i) those which offered (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Annotated Bibliography on Plato's Phaedo.David Ebrey - 2017 - Oxford Bibliographies.
    8000 Word annotated bibliography on the Phaedo, with roughly 70 entries. Note that the subscription version is a bit easier to navigate. The hyperlinks work in this pdf, but you can not as easily jump to the different sections.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • I—Ursula Coope: Aristotle on Action.Ursula Coope - 2007 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):109-138.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • A causalidade em Pedro da Fonseca.António Manuel Martins - 2009 - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs 54 (3):112-127.
    In this paper we intend to present briefly the way Fonseca deals with the doctrine of causation in his Commentaries on the Metaphysics of Aristotle. We shall begin with the presentation of the map of the disputations on causation in that work (I), then will refer to the position of Fonseca on the definition of cause (II), the relation between cause and principle (III) and, finally, his defense of the Aristotelian four causes (IV).
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Gorgias' Defense: Plato and His Opponents on Rhetoric and the Good.Rachel Barney - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (1):95-121.
    This paper explores in detail Gorgias' defense of rhetoric in Plato 's Gorgias, noting its connections to earlier and later texts such as Aristophanes' Clouds, Gorgias' Helen, Isocrates' Nicocles and Antidosis, and Aristotle's Rhetoric. The defense as Plato presents it is transparently inadequate; it reveals a deep inconsistency in Gorgias' conception of rhetoric and functions as a satirical precursor to his refutation by Socrates. Yet Gorgias' defense is appropriated, in a streamlined form, by later defenders of rhetoric such as Isocrates (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Philoponus on the Priority of Substances.Riin Sirkel - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (3):351-372.
    One of the issues that deeply interested the philosophers of late antiquity, the Ancient Greek Commentators, concerns the priority of substances. While questions concerning ontological priority have recently attracted attention in Aristotelian scholarship and contemporary metaphysics, the Commentators’ discussions have not yet received the attention they deserve. My aim is to start to fill in this gap, by focusing on John Philoponus’s account of the priority of substances in his commentary on Aristotle’s "Categories". In particular, I aim to show how (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Powers of Plato's Tripartite Psychology.Rachana Kamtekar - unknown
    There is a mystery right at the heart of Plato ’s famous doctrine of the three parts of the soul, as this doctrine is presented in the Republic, Phaedrus and Timaeus: just what is a soul ‘part’? Republic IV tells us a way to distinguish soul parts, namely by the Principle of Opposites : since ‘the same thing will not do or undergo opposites in the same respect, in relation to the same thing, at the same time’, whenever we find (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Plotinus' Epistemology and His Reading of the «Theaetetus».Sara Magrin - unknown
    The thesis offers a reconstruction of Plotinus' reading of the Theaetetus, and it presents an account of his epistemology that rests on that reading. It aims to show that Plotinus reads the Theaetetus as containing two anti-sceptical arguments. The first argument is an answer to radical scepticism, namely, to the thesis that nothing is apprehensible and judgement must be suspended on all matters. The second argument is an answer to a more moderate form of scepticism, which does not endorse a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Consistency and Akrasia in Plato's Protagoras.Raphael Woolf - 2002 - Phronesis 47 (3):224-252.
    Relatively little attention has been paid to Socrates' argument against akrasia in Plato's "Protagoras" as an example of Socratic method. Yet seen from this perspective the argument has some rather unusual features: in particular, the presence of an impersonal interlocutor ("the many") and the absence of the crisp and explicit argumentation that is typical of Socratic elenchus. I want to suggest that these features are problematic, considerably more so than has sometimes been supposed, and to offer a reading of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Interpreting Quantum Nonlocality as Platonic Information.James C. Emerson - unknown
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Explanation and Teleology in Aristotle's Philosophy of Nature.Mariska Elisabeth Maria Philomena Johannes Leunissen - unknown
    This dissertation explores Aristotle’s use of teleology as a principle of explanation, especially as it is used in the natural treatises. Its main purposes are, first, to determine the function, structure, and explanatory power of teleological explanations in four of Aristotle’s natural treatises, that is, in Physica (book II), De Anima, De Partibus Animalium (including the practice in books II-IV), and De Caelo (book II). Its second purpose is to confront these findings about Aristotle’s practice in the natural treatises with (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • X-RestlessForms andChangelessCauses.Fiona Leigh - 2012 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 112 (2pt2):239-261.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Knowledge and True Belief at Theaetetus 201a–C.Tamer Nawar - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (6):1052-1070.
    This paper examines a passage in the Theaetetus where Plato distinguishes knowledge from true belief by appealing to the example of a jury hearing a case. While the jurors may have true belief, Socrates puts forward two reasons why they cannot achieve knowledge. The reasons for this nescience have typically been taken to be in tension with each other . This paper proposes a solution to the putative difficulty by arguing that what links the two cases of nescience is that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Restless Forms and Changeless Causes.Fiona Leigh - 2012 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 112 (2pt2):239-261.
    It is widely held that in Plato's Sophist, Forms rest or change or both. The received opinion is, however, false—or so I will argue. There is no direct support for it in the text and several passages tell against it. I will further argue that, contrary to the view of some scholars, Plato did not in this dialogue advocate a kind of change recognizable as 'Cambridge change', as applicable to his Forms. The reason that Forms neither change nor rest is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Argument Against the Friends of the Forms Revisited: Sophist 248a4–249d5.Michael Wiitala - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (2):171-200.
    There are only two places in which Plato explicitly offers a critique of the sort of theory of forms presented in the Phaedo and Republic: at the beginning of the Parmenides and in the argument against the Friends of the Forms in the Sophist. An accurate account of the argument against the Friends, therefore, is crucial to a proper understanding of Plato’s metaphysics. How the argument against the Friends ought to be construed and what it aims to accomplish, however, are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Theòs Anaítios: A Commentary on Plato's Theodicy in Light of Timeu.Jacqueline Bergamini Maretto - 2014 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 12:31-40.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Causation in the Phaedo.Sean Kelsey - 2004 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (1):21–43.
    In the _Phaedo Socrates says that as a young man he thought it a great thing to know the causes of things; but finding existing accounts unsatisfying, he fell back on a method of his own, hypothesizing that Forms are causes. I argue that part of what this hypothesis says is that certain phenomena--the ones for which it postulates Forms as causes--are the result of processes whose object was to produce them. I then use this conclusion to explain how Socrates' (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Sufficient Reason, Identities and Discernibles in Plotinus.Asger Ousager - 2003 - Dionysius 21.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Hippias Major and Aesthetics.Christopher Raymond - 2009 - Literature & Aesthetics 19 (1):32-50.
  • Aristotle on Action.Ursula Coope - 2007 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):109–138.
  • Philosophy of the Ancient Commentators on Aristotle.Miira Tuominen - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (12):852-895.
    From the first century BCE onwards, philosophers started to write commentaries on those Aristotle’s treatises that were meant for the internal use of his school. Plato’s works had been commented on already earlier, the first reported commentary originates in the 300s BCE. Commentaries are treatises that follow an object text in a more or less linear fashion. The format was not unknown before the first century BCE but new in extensive philosophical use. This review essay focuses on authors who commented (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Are There Forms of Sensible Qualities in Plato?Peter D. Larsen - 2018 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 4 (2):225-242.
    This paper addresses the question of whether, according to Plato, there are forms of sensible qualities; it is also addressed to the wider question of whether there are forms of physical and material things more generally. In particular, it considers the tension raised by the following theses: (1) a Platonic form is the essence of some thing; (2) for Plato, those essences that are forms are imperceptible and are knowable through reasoning alone; (3) knowing the essence of a particular color (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Xii &Ast;—Form–Particular Resemblance in Plato's Phaedo.David Sedley - 2006 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (1):311-327.
    This paper is a critical re-examination of the argument in Plato's "Phaedo" for the thesis that all learning is recollection of prenatal knowledge. Plato's speaker Socrates concentrates on the case of 'equal sticks and stones', viewed as striving without complete success to resemble a Form, the Equal itself. The paper argues that (a) this is a rather special case, focused on geometry; (b) Plato is at pains to emphasize that the Form-particular relation need not be one of resemblance at all, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Being and Power in Plato's Sophist.Fiona Leigh - 2010 - Apeiron 43 (1):63-85.
  • "Euthyphro" 10a2-11b1: A Study in Platonic Metaphysics and its Reception Since 1960.David Wolfsdorf - 2005 - Apeiron 38 (1):1-72.
  • Is There Something in Common? Forms and the Theory of Word Meaning.Timothy Pritchard - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):1675-1694.
    Plato's reflections on Forms have generally been overlooked, in contemporary Philosophy of Language, as a serious resource for illuminating the notion of word meaning. In part, this is due to the influence of Wittgenstein's critical reflections on looking for ‘something in common’ as explanatory for use of a general term. I argue that, far from being undermined, appeal to Forms can both help explain, and provide corrective critical insight into, Wittgenstein's observations. Plato's reflections provide insight into word meaning that is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Ideen und Sprache.Alexander Becker - 2017 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 65 (6):1057-1083.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie Jahrgang: 65 Heft: 6 Seiten: 1057-1083.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark