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  1. 'False hope in assisted reproduction: the normative significance of the external outlook and moral negotiation.Dorian Accoe & Seppe Segers - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (3):181-184.
    Despite the frequent invocation of ‘false hope’ and possible related moral concerns in the context of assisted reproduction technologies, a focused ethical and conceptual problematisation of this concept seems to be lacking. We argue that an invocation of ‘false hope’ only makes sense if the fulfilment of a desired outcome (eg, a successful fertility treatment) is impossible, and if it is attributed from an external perspective. The evaluation incurred by this third party may foreclose a given perspective from being an (...)
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  • Equal Access to Parenthood and the Imperfect Duty to Benefit.J. Y. Lee & Ezio Di Nucci - 2023 - Philosophy of Medicine 4 (1).
    Should involuntarily childless people have the same opportunities to access parenthood as those who are not involuntarily childless? In the context of assisted reproductive technologies, affirmative answers to this question are often cashed out in terms of positive rights, including rights to third-party reproduction. In this paper, we critically explore the scope and extent to which any such right would hold up morally. Ultimately, we argue for a departure away from positive parental rights. Instead, we argue that the state has (...)
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  • Rewriting the genetic bond: Gene editing and our understanding of genetic parenthood.Shelly Simana & Vardit Ravitsky - 2022 - Bioethics 37 (3):265-274.
    One of the most prominent justifications for the use of germline gene editing (GGE) is that it would allow parents to have a “genetically related child” while preventing the transmission of genetic disorders. However, we argue that since future uses of GGE may involve large-scale genetic modifications, they may affect the genetic relatedness between parents and offspring in a meaningful way: Due to certain genetic modifications, children may inherit much less than 50% of their DNA from each parent. We show (...)
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  • The path toward ectogenesis: looking beyond the technical challenges.Seppe Segers - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-15.
    BackgroundBreakthroughs in animal studies make the topic of human application of ectogenesis for medical and non-medical purposes more relevant than ever before. While current data do not yet demonstrate a reasonable expectation of clinical benefit soon, several groups are investigating the feasibility of artificial uteri for extracorporeal human gestation.Main textThis paper offers the first comprehensive and up to date discussion of the most important pros and cons of human ectogenesis in light of clinical application, along with an examination of crucial (...)
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  • Discussing social hierarchies and the importance of genetic ties: a commentary on Petersen.Seppe Segers - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (3):169-170.
    I am happy to comment on T S Petersen’s1 examination of the ‘individualization argument against non-medical egg freezing ’. Petersen intervenes in the ethical discussion on egg freezing by critically reconsidering a specific type of argument against oocyte cryopreservation for reasons that are not directly related with medical issues. Petersen dissects the claim that such non-medical usage is ‘an individualistic and morally problematic solution to the social problems that women face, for instance, in the labour market’.1 Proponents of this argument (...)
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  • Wrongful genetic connection: neither blood of my blood, nor flesh of my flesh.Vera Lúcia Raposo - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (2):309-319.
    The use of reproductive techniques and the eventual reproductive negligence from the provider of reproductive services gave rise to situations in which the intended parents are deprived of raising a child genetically connected to them. Courts have been dealing with cases of those for years, but have systemically denied claimants compensation, failing to recognise as damage the loss of genetic connection. In 2017, for the first time, the Singapore High Court provided compensation for that damage, labelled “loss of genetic affinity”. (...)
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  • Initial heritable genome editing: mapping a responsible pathway from basic research to the clinic.Robert Ranisch, Katharina Trettenbach & Gardar Arnason - 2023 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 26 (1):21-35.
    Following the Second Summit on Human Gene Editing in Hong Kong in 2018, where the birth of two girls with germline genome editing was revealed, the need for a responsible pathway to the clinical application of human germline genome editing has been repeatedly emphasised. This paper aims to contribute to the ongoing discussion on research ethics issues in germline genome editing by exploring key issues related to the initial applications of CRISPR in reproductive medicine. Following an overview of the current (...)
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  • ‘I feel that injustice is being done to me’: a qualitative study of women’s viewpoints on the (lack of) reimbursement for social egg freezing.Veerle Provoost, Julie Nekkebroeck, Gily Coene & Michiel De Proost - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundDuring the last decade, the possibility for women to cryopreserve oocytes in anticipation of age-related fertility loss, also referred to as social egg freezing, has become an established practice at fertility clinics around the globe. In Europe, there is extensive variation in the costs for this procedure, with the common denominator that there are almost no funding arrangements or reimbursement policies. This is the first qualitative study that specifically explores viewpoints on the (lack of) reimbursement for women who had considered (...)
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  • Carrying the same pregnancy: A bioethical overview on Reciprocal effortless IVF and similar techniques.Emanuele Mangione - 2023 - Clinical Ethics 18 (2):271-279.
    Nowadays, novel techniques such as Reciprocal effortless in vitro fertilization (ReIVF) enable two individuals to “carry the same pregnancy,” that is to “carry” the same embryo in both their bodies. However, even though these techniques are likely to be increasingly requested, little is known about their safety and efficacy, and much less about their bioethical legitimacy and issues. Considering their uniqueness, this study assesses the compatibility of ReIVF as well as of another similar technique with the classical principles of medical (...)
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  • Rethinking advanced motherhood: a new ethical narrative.Eva De Clercq, Andrea Martani, Nicolas Vulliemoz, Bernice S. Elger & Tenzin Wangmo - 2023 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 26 (4):591-603.
    The aim of the study is to rethink the ethics of advanced motherhood. In the literature, delayed childbearing is usually discussed in the context of reproductive justice, and in relationship to ethical issues associated with the use and risk of assisted reproductive technologies. We aim to go beyond these more “traditional” ways in which reproductive ethics is framed by revisiting ethics itself through the lens of the figure of the so-called “older” mother. For this purpose, we start by exploring some (...)
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  • Equal Access to Parenthood and the Imperfect Duty to Benefit.Ji-Young Lee & Ezio Di Nucci - forthcoming - Philosophy of Medicine.
    Should involuntarily childless people have the sameopportunities to access parenthood as those who are not involuntarily childless? In the context of assisted reproductive technologies, affirmative answers to this question are often cashed out in terms of positive rights, including rights to third-party reproduction. In this paper, wecritically explore the scope and extent to which any such right would hold up morally. Ultimately, we argue for a departure away from positive parental rights. Instead, we argue that the state has an imperfect (...)
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