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Alexander of Aphrodisias: Scholasticism and Innovation

In Wolfgang Haase (ed.), Philosophie, Wissenschaften, Technik. Philosophie. De Gruyter. pp. 1176-1243 (1987)

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  1. Alexander of Aphrodisias and His Doctrine of the Soul: 1400 Years of Lasting Significance.Eckhard Kessler - 2011 - Brill.
    This piece of work intends to shed light on Alexander of Aphrodisias from the second-century Aristotle commentator through the history of Aristotelian psychology up to the sixteenth century's clandestine prompter of the new philosophy of nature. In the millennium after his death the head of the Peripatetic school in Athens served as the authority on Aristotle in the Neo-Platonic school, survived the Arabic centuries of philosophy as Averroes' exemplary exponent of the mortality of the soul and as such was not (...)
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  • Platonism and the Invention of the Problem of Universals.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2004 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 86 (3):233-256.
    In this paper, I explore the origins of the ‘problem of universals’. I argue that the problem has come to be badly formulated and that consideration of it has been impeded by falsely supposing that Platonic Forms were ever intended as an alternative to Aristotelian universals. In fact, the role that Forms are supposed by Plato to fulfill is independent of the function of a universal. I briefly consider the gradual mutation of the problem in the Academy, in Alexander of (...)
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  • Ancient Theories of Freedom and Determinism.Tim O'Keefe - 2020 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy:00-00.
    A fairly long (~15,000 word) overview of ancient theories of freedom and determinism. It covers the supposed threat of causal determinism to "free will," i.e., the sort of control we need to have in order to be rightly held responsible for our actions. But it also discusses fatalistic arguments that proceed from the Principle of Bivalence, what responsibility we have for our own characters, and god and fate. Philosophers discussed include Aristotle, Epicurus, the Stoics, Carneades, Alexander of Aphrodisias, and Plotinus. (...)
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  • Michael of Ephesus. A Commentator of Aristotle and a Thinker.Georges Arabatzis - 2012 - Peitho 3 (1):199-210.
    The article examines the state of research on Michael of Ephesus as a probable author of the Commentaries on Metaphysics E–N, mainly the works of Leonardo Tarán and Concetta Luna. In spite of their opposed views, they both agree on the mediocrity of the Byzantine author. The article questions the criteria for this negative appraisal and offers some material for reconsidering Michael of Ephesus’ idea of philo­sophical culture.
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  • Aristotle's Two Intellects: A Modest Proposal.Victor Caston - 1999 - Phronesis 44 (3):199-227.
    In "De anima" 3.5, Aristotle argues for the existence of a second intellect, the so-called "Agent Intellect." The logical structure of his argument turns on a distinction between different types of soul, rather than different faculties within a given soul; and the attributes he assigns to the second species make it clear that his concern here -- as at the climax of his other great works, such as the "Metaphysics," the "Nicomachean" and the "Eudemian Ethics" -- is the difference between (...)
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  • Alexander of Aphrodisias and His Doctrine of the Soul 1400 Years of Lasting Significance.Eckhard Kessler - 2011 - Early Science and Medicine 16 (1):1-93.
    This piece of work intends to shed light on Alexander of Aphrodisias from the second-century Aristotle commentator through the history of Aristotelian psychology up to the sixteenth century's clandestine prompter of the new philosophy of nature. In the millennium after his death the head of the Peripatetic school in Athens served as the authority on Aristotle in the Neo-Platonic school, survived the Arabic centuries of philosophy as Averroes' exemplary exponent of the mortality of the soul and as such was not (...)
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  • Colloquium 2: Force and Compulsion in Aristotle’s Ethics1.Kevin Flannery - 2007 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):41-67.
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  • Receptive Reason: Alexander of Aphrodisias on Material Intellect.Miira Tuominen - 2010 - Phronesis 55 (2):170-190.
    According to Alexander of Aphrodisias, our potential intellect is a purely receptive capacity. Alexander also claims that, in order for us to actualise our intellectual potentiality, the intellect needs to abstract what is intelligible from enmattered perceptible objects. Now a problem emerges: How is it possible for a purely receptive capacity to perform such an abstraction? It will be argued that even though Alexander's reaction to this question causes some tension in his theory, the philosophical motivation for it is a (...)
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  • O Tratado Do Impulso E da Faculdade Impulsiva de Alexandre de Afrodísia E Sua Versão Em Miguel de Éfeso.Marco Zingano - 2008 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 2 (2).
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