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  1. Unconscious Influences on Decision Making: A Critical Review.Ben R. Newell & David R. Shanks - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):1-19.
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  • Mindfulness Reduces Habitual Responding Based on Implicit Knowledge: Evidence From Artificial Grammar Learning.Stephen Whitmarsh, Julia Uddén, Henk Barendregt & Karl Magnus Petersson - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):833-845.
    Participants were unknowingly exposed to complex regularities in a working memory task. The existence of implicit knowledge was subsequently inferred from a preference for stimuli with similar grammatical regularities. Several affective traits have been shown to influence AGL performance positively, many of which are related to a tendency for automatic responding. We therefore tested whether the mindfulness trait predicted a reduction of grammatically congruent preferences, and used emotional primes to explore the influence of affect. Mindfulness was shown to correlate negatively (...)
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  • Self-Perception Theory, Radical Behaviourism, and the Publicity/Privacy Issue.Giuseppe Lo Dico - 2018 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 9 (2):429-445.
    According to Bem’s self-perception theory, people know their own minds in the same way that they know those of others: they infer their own minds by observing their own behavior and the circumstances in which this behavior takes place. Although Bem’s theory seems anti-introspectionistic, it claims that people infer their minds by observing their own behavior only when internal cues are weak, ambiguous, or un-interpretable. This has led some to argue that Bem does not rule out a priori introspective access (...)
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  • The Emergence of Explicit Knowledge in a Serial Reaction Time Task: The Role of Experienced Fluency and Strength of Representation.Sarah Esser & Hilde Haider - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Intuitive Feelings of Warmth and Confidence in Insight and Noninsight Problem Solving of Magic Tricks.Mikael R. Hedne, Elisabeth Norman & Janet Metcalfe - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Alternative Strategies of Categorization.Edward E. Smith, Andrea L. Patalano & John Jonides - 1998 - Cognition 65 (2-3):167-196.
  • Cognitive Science and Phenomenal Consciousness: A Dilemma, and How to Avoid It.Gerard O'Brien & Jon Opie - 1997 - Philosophical Psychology 10 (3):269-86.
    When it comes to applying computational theory to the problem of phenomenal consciousness, cognitive scientists appear to face a dilemma. The only strategy that seems to be available is one that explains consciousness in terms of special kinds of computational processes. But such theories, while they dominate the field, have counter-intuitive consequences; in particular, they force one to accept that phenomenal experience is composed of information processing effects. For cognitive scientists, therefore, it seems to come down to a choice between (...)
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  • Introspective Physicalism as an Approach to the Science of Consciousness.Anthony I. Jack & T. Shallice - 2001 - Cognition 79 (1):161-196.
    Most ?theories of consciousness? are based on vague speculations about the properties of conscious experience. We aim to provide a more solid basis for a science of consciousness. We argue that a theory of consciousness should provide an account of the very processes that allow us to acquire and use information about our own mental states ? the processes underlying introspection. This can be achieved through the construction of information processing models that can account for ?Type-C? processes. Type-C processes can (...)
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  • A Single Paradigm for Implicit and Statistical Learning.Padraic Monaghan, Christine Schoetensack & Patrick Rebuschat - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (3):536-554.
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  • Implicit Learning: News From the Front.Axel Cleeremans, Arnaud Destrebecqz & Maud Boyer - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (10):406-416.
    69 Thompson-Schill, S.L. _et al. _(1997) Role of left inferior prefrontal cortex 59 Buckner, R.L. _et al. _(1996) Functional anatomic studies of memory in retrieval of semantic knowledge: a re-evaluation _Proc. Natl. Acad._ retrieval for auditory words and pictures _J. Neurosci. _16, 6219–6235 _Sci. U. S. A. _94, 14792–14797 60 Buckner, R.L. _et al. _(1995) Functional anatomical studies of explicit and 70 Baddeley, A. (1992) Working memory: the interface between memory implicit memory retrieval tasks _J. Neurosci. _15, 12–29 and cognition (...)
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  • Evaluative Conditioning is Pavlovian Conditioning: Issues of Definition, Measurement, and the Theoretical Importance of Contingency Awareness.Andy P. Field - 2000 - Consciousness and Cognition 9 (1):41-49.
    In her commentary of Field (1999), Hammerl (1999) has drawn attention to several interesting points concerning the issue of contingency awareness in evaluative conditioning. First, she comments on several contentious issues arising from Field's review of the evaluative conditioning literature, second she critiques the data from his pilot study and finally she argues the case that EC is a distinct form of conditioning that can occur in the absence of contingency awareness. With reference to these criticisms, this reply attempts to (...)
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  • Reuniting Perception and Conception.Robert L. Goldstone & Lawrence W. Barsalou - 1998 - Cognition 65 (2-3):231-262.
  • “Economic Man” in Cross-Cultural Perspective: Behavioral Experiments in 15 Small-Scale Societies.Joseph Henrich, Robert Boyd, Samuel Bowles, Colin Camerer, Ernst Fehr, Herbert Gintis, Richard McElreath, Michael Alvard, Abigail Barr, Jean Ensminger, Natalie Smith Henrich, Kim Hill, Francisco Gil-White, Michael Gurven, Frank W. Marlowe & John Q. Patton - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):795-815.
    Researchers from across the social sciences have found consistent deviations from the predictions of the canonical model of self-interest in hundreds of experiments from around the world. This research, however, cannot determine whether the uniformity results from universal patterns of human behavior or from the limited cultural variation available among the university students used in virtually all prior experimental work. To address this, we undertook a cross-cultural study of behavior in ultimatum, public goods, and dictator games in a range of (...)
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  • Implicit Learning and Consciousness: A Graded, Dynamic Perspective.Axel Cleeremans & Luis Jimenez - 2002 - In Robert M. French & Axel Cleeremans (eds.), Implicit Learning and Consciousness: An Empirical. Psychology Press.
    While the study of implicit learning is nothing new, the field as a whole has come to embody — over the last decade or so — ongoing questioning about three of the most fundamental debates in the cognitive sciences: The nature of consciousness, the nature of mental representation (in particular the difficult issue of abstraction), and the role of experience in shaping the cognitive system. Our main goal in this chapter is to offer a framework that attempts to integrate current (...)
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  • Conditional Routing of Information to the Cortex: A Model of the Basal Ganglia’s Role in Cognitive Coordination.Andrea Stocco, Christian Lebiere & John R. Anderson - 2010 - Psychological Review 117 (2):541-574.
  • A New Look at Habits and the Habit-Goal Interface.Wendy Wood & David T. Neal - 2007 - Psychological Review 114 (4):843-863.
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  • Language Deficits, Localization, and Grammar: Evidence for a Distributive Model of Language Breakdown in Aphasic Patients and Neurologically Intact Individuals.Frederic Dick, Elizabeth Bates, Beverly Wulfeck, Jennifer Aydelott Utman, Nina Dronkers & Morton Ann Gernsbacher - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (4):759-788.
  • Neuropsychological Dissociations Between Priming and Recognition: A Single-System Connectionist Account.Annette Kinder & David R. Shanks - 2003 - Psychological Review 110 (4):728-744.
  • Don’T Bet on It! Wagering as a Measure of Awareness in Decision Making Under Uncertainty.Emmanouil Konstantinidis & David R. Shanks - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (6):2111-2134.
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  • Rules and Exemplars in Category Learning.Michael A. Erickson & John K. Kruschke - 1998 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 127 (2):107-140.
  • Exogenous Attention to Unseen Objects?Liam J. Norman, Charles A. Heywood & Robert W. Kentridge - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 35:319-329.
  • Connecting Conscious and Unconscious Processing.Axel Cleeremans - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1286-1315.
    Consciousness remains a mystery—“a phenomenon that people do not know how to think about—yet” (Dennett, , p. 21). Here, I consider how the connectionist perspective on information processing may help us progress toward the goal of understanding the computational principles through which conscious and unconscious processing differ. I begin by delineating the conceptual challenges associated with classical approaches to cognition insofar as understanding unconscious information processing is concerned, and to highlight several contrasting computational principles that are constitutive of the connectionist (...)
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  • Similarity and Rules: Distinct? Exhaustive? Empirically Distinguishable?Ulrike Hahn & Nick Chater - 1998 - Cognition 65 (2-3):197-230.
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  • Explicitness with Psychological Ground.Fernando Martínez & Jesus Ezquerro - 1998 - Minds and Machines 8 (3):353-374.
  • Does Opposition Logic Provide Evidence for Conscious and Unconscious Processes in Artificial Grammar Learning?Richard J. Tunney & David R. Shanks - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (2):201-218.
    The question of whether studies of human learning provide evidence for distinct conscious and unconscious influences remains as controversial today as ever. Much of this controversy arises from the use of the logic of dissociation. The controversy has prompted the use of an alternative approach that places conscious and unconscious influences on memory retrieval in opposition. Here we ask whether evidence acquired via the logic of opposition requires a dual-process account or whether it can be accommodated within a single similarity-based (...)
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  • Representation and Knowledge Are Not the Same Thing.Leslie Smith - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):784-785.
    Two standard epistemological accounts are conflated in Dienes & Perner's account of knowledge, and this conflation requires the rejection of their four conditions of knowledge. Because their four metarepresentations applied to the explicit-implicit distinction are paired with these conditions, it follows by modus tollens that if the latter are inadequate, then so are the former. Quite simply, their account misses the link between true reasoning and knowledge.
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  • On the Automaticity of Pure Perceptual Sequence Learning.Daphné Coomans, Natacha Deroost, Peter Zeischka & Eric Soetens - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1460-1472.
    We investigated the automaticity of implicit sequence learning by varying perceptual load in a pure perceptual sequence learning paradigm. Participants responded to the randomly changing identity of a target, while the irrelevant target location was structured. In Experiment 1, the target was presented under low or high perceptual load during training, whereas testing occurred without load. Unexpectedly, no sequence learning was observed. In Experiment 2, perceptual load was introduced during the test phase to determine whether load is required to express (...)
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  • Representational Redescription and Cognitive Architectures.Antonella Carassa & Maurizio Tirassa - 1994 - Carassa, Antonella and Tirassa, Maurizio (1994) Representational Redescription and Cognitive Architectures. [Journal (Paginated)] 17 (4):711-712.
    We focus on Karmiloff-Smith's Representational redescription model, arguing that it poses some problems concerning the architecture of a redescribing system. To discuss the topic, we consider the implicit/explicit dichotomy and the relations between natur al language and the language of thought. We argue that the model regards how knowledge is employed rather than how it is represented in the system.
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  • Dynamics of Perceptual Learning in Visual Search.Schlagbauer Bernhard - unknown
    The present work is concerned with a phenomenon referred to as contextual cueing. In visual search, if a searched-for target object is consistently encountered within a stable spatial arrangement of distractor objects, detecting the target becomes more efficient over time, relative to non-repeated, random arrangements. This effect is attributed to learned target-distractor spatial associations stored in long-term memory, which expedite visual search. This Thesis investigates four aspects of contextual cueing: Study 1 tackled the implicit-explicit debate of contextual cueing from a (...)
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  • First- and Third-Person Approaches in Implicit Learning Research.Vinciane Gaillard, Muriel Vandenberghe, Arnaud Destrebecqz & Axel Cleeremans - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (4):709-722.
    How do we find out whether someone is conscious of some information or not? A simple answer is “We just ask them”! However, things are not so simple. Here, we review recent developments in the use of subjective and objective methods in implicit learning research and discuss the highly complex methodological problems that their use raises in the domain.
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  • Two Types of Thought: Evidence From Aphasia.Jules Davidoff - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):20-21.
    Evidence from aphasia is considered that leads to a distinction between abstract and concrete thought processes and hence for a distinction between rules and similarity. It is argued that perceptual classification is inherently a rule-following procedure and these rules are unable to be followed when a patient has difficulty with name comprehension and retrieval.
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  • An Old Problem: How Can We Distinguish Between Conscious and Unconscious Knowledge Acquired in an Implicit Learning Task?Hilde Haider, Alexandra Eichler & Thorsten Lange - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):658-672.
    A long lasting debate in the field of implicit learning is whether participants can learn without acquiring conscious knowledge. One crucial problem is that no clear criterion exists allowing to identify participants who possess explicit knowledge. Here, we propose a method to diagnose during a serial reaction time task those participants who acquire conscious knowledge. We first validated this method by using Stroop-like material during training. Then we assessed participants’ knowledge with the Inclusion/Exclusion task and the wagering task . Both (...)
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  • Implicit Learning in Rule Induction and Problem Solving.Aldo Zanga, Jean-François Richard & Charles Tijus - 2004 - Thinking and Reasoning 10 (1):55-83.
  • Measuring Consciousness: Is One Measure Better Than the Other?Kristian Sandberg, Bert Timmermans, Morten Overgaard & Axel Cleeremans - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):1069-1078.
    What is the best way of assessing the extent to which people are aware of a stimulus? Here, using a masked visual identification task, we compared three measures of subjective awareness: The Perceptual Awareness Scale , through which participants are asked to rate the clarity of their visual experience; confidence ratings , through which participants express their confidence in their identification decisions, and Post-decision wagering , in which participants place a monetary wager on their decisions. We conducted detailed explorations of (...)
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  • Beyond Modularity: Neural Evidence for Constructivist Principles in Development.Steven R. Quartz & Terrence J. Sejnowski - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):725-726.
  • Where Redescriptions Come From.David R. Olson - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):725-725.
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  • Representational Change, Generality Versus Specificity, and Nature Versus Nurture: Perennial Issues in Cognitive Research.Stellan Ohlsson - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):724-725.
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  • Beyond Methodological Solipsism?Michael Losonsky - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):723-724.
  • The Power of Explicit Knowing.Deanna Kuhn - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):722-723.
  • Genes, Development, and the “Innate” Structure of the Mind.Timothy D. Johnston - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):721-722.
  • Representational Redescription, Memory, and Connectionism.P. J. Hampson - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):721-721.
  • Beyond Connectionist Versus Classical Al: A Control Theoretic Perspective on Development and Cognitive Science.Rick Grush - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):720-720.
  • Dissociation, Self-Attribution, and Redescription.George Graham - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):719-719.
  • Do You Have to Be Right to Redescribe?Susan Goldin-Meadow & Martha Wagner Alibali - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):718-719.
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  • Redescription of Intentionality.Norman H. Freeman - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):717-718.
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  • Arguments Against Linguistic “Modularization”.Susan H. Foster-Cohen - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):716-717.
  • Developmental Psychology for the Twenty-First Century.David Estes - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):715-716.
  • Representation: Ontogenesis and Phylogenesis.Merlin Donald - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):714-715.
  • The Risks of Rationalising Cognitive Development.Beatrice de Gelder - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):713-714.
  • Redescribing Redescription.Terry Dartnall - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):712-713.
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