Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Review of Yahya M. Madra’s Late Neoclassical Economics. The Restoration of Theoretical Humanism in Contemporary Economic Theory. New York: Routledge, 218 Pp. [REVIEW]Ramzi Mabsout - 2018 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 11 (1):107-116.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Uncertainty and Identity: A Post Keynesian Approach.John B. Davis - 2010 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 3 (1):33-49.
    Marshall’s asset equilibrium model provides a way ofexplaining the identity of entrepreneurs. Keynes adopted this model buttransformed it when he emphasized the short-period and volatilecharacter of long-term expectations. This entails a view of entrepreneuridentity in which radical uncertainty plays a central role. This in turndeepens the post Keynesian view of uncertainty as ontological in thatentrepreneurs’ survival plays into their behavior. This paper exploresthis role-based view of individual identity and uses the analysis tocomment on Keynes’s ideas for the socialization of investment (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Hayek on the Wisdom of Prices: A Reassessment.Richard Bronk - 2013 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 6 (1):82-107.
  • Epistemological Implications of Economic Complexity.J. Barkley Rosser - 2004 - Annals of the Japan Association for Philosophy of Science 13 (1):45-57.
  • The Connectionist Mind: A Study of Hayekian Psychology.Barry Smith - 1997 - In Stephen F. Frowen (ed.), Hayek: Economist and Social Philosopher: A Critical Retrospect. London: St. Martin's Press. pp. 9-29.
    In his book The Sensory Order, Hayek anticipates many of the central ideas behind what we now call the connectionist paradigm, and develops on this basis a theory of the workings of the human mind that extends the thinking of Hume and Mach. He shows that the idea of neural networks is can be applied not only in psychology and neurology but also in the sphere of economics. For the mind, from the perspective of The Sensory Order, is a dynamic, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • On the Merits of Critical Realism and the “Ontological Turn” in Economics: Reply to Steele.Paul A. Lewis - 2011 - Critical Review 23 (1-2):207-230.
    The discipline of economics can benefit from a more explicit, systematic, and sustained concern with ontology; that is, with the philosophical analysis of the nature of the social world. Contrary to the argument advanced in these pages by Gerry Steele , critical-realist ontological analysis encourages fruitful economic research in a number of ways: by helping to identify research methods suitable for analyzing economic issues; by promoting the development of key substantive economic concepts; and by helping to reveal and resolve inconsistencies (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • “Search” Vs. “Browse”: A Theory of Error Grounded in Radical (Not Rational) Ignorance.Anthony J. Evans & Jeffrey Friedman - 2011 - Critical Review 23 (1-2):73-104.
    Economists tend to view ignorance as ?rational,? neglecting the possibility that ignorance is unintentional. This oversight is reflected in economists? model of ?information search,? which can be fruitfully contrasted with ?information browsing.? Information searches are designed to discover unknown knowns, whose value is calculable ex ante, such that this value justifies the cost of the search. In this model of human information acquisition, there is no primal or ?radical? ignorance that might prevent people from knowing which information to look for, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Formalism in Austrian‐School Welfare Economics: Another Pretense of Knowledge?David L. Prychitko - 1993 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 7 (4):567-592.
    Contemporary Austrian‐school economists reject neoclassical welfare theory for being founded on the benchmark of a perfectly competitive general equilibrium, and instead favor a formal theory deemed consistent with the notions of radical subjectivism and disequilibrium analysis. Roy Cordato advances a bold free‐market benchmark by which to formally assess social welfare, economic efficiency, and externalities issues. Like all formalist, a priori theory, however, Cordato's reformulation cannot meet its own standards, being theoretically and empirically flawed, and perhaps ideologically suspect.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Dissecting the Black Swan.Jochen Runde - 2009 - Critical Review 21 (4):491-505.
    ABSTRACT What constitutes a Black Swan? And under what conditions may a Black Swan be expected to arise? As Nassim Taleb describes it, a Black Swan is an event that displays three key properties, the two most important of which are that: (1) it is not even imagined as a possibility prior to its occurrence; and (2) it is in some way significant in its impact. It follows that whether or not an event counts as a Black Swan depends on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Between Vienna and Cambridge: The Risky Business of New Austrian Business‐Cycle Theory.J. Barkley Rosser - 1999 - Critical Review 13 (3-4):373-389.
    Abstract Tyler Cowen's ?New Austrian? theory of business cycles is based on risk analysis and the assumption of rational expectations. This contrasts with the Old Austrian view, which questions the feasibility of measuring economic risk. Despite Cowen's admirable eclecticism, the way he applies risk analysis to business cycles suffers from serious inconsistencies, and his use of rational expectations is mistaken in the face of economic complexity?a phenomenon that was accurately understood by the traditional Austrians.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • What Has Realism Got To Do With It?Tony Lawson - 1999 - Economics and Philosophy 15 (2):269.