Switch to: References

Citations of:

Reconstructing Political Theory: Feminist Perspectives

Pennsylvania State University Press (1997)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Beyond the Public/Private Dichotomy: Relational Space and Sexual Inequalities.Chris Armstrong & Judith Squires - 2002 - Contemporary Political Theory 1 (3):261-283.
    The public/private dichotomy has long been the object of considerable attention for feminists. We argue that, by focusing their attention on a divide which has declined in importance, feminists may fail to keep up with the current means by which sexual inequalities are perpetuated. Furthermore, by concentrating on this divide feminists risk reproducing such dichotomous thinking in their own work, discursively perpetuating that which they had initially hoped to displace. We begin by surveying feminist critiques of the public/private dichotomy, consider (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's "Damnation of Women".Lawrie Balfour - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):127 - 148.
    In this essay, I contend that feminist theories of citizenship in the U.S. context must go beyond simply acknowledging the importance of race and grapple explicitly with the legacies of slavery. To sketch this case, I draw upon W.E.B. Du Bois's "The Damnation of Women," which explores the significance for all Americans of African American women's sexual, economic, and political lives under slavery and in its aftermath.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's “Damnation of Women”.Lawrie Balfour - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):127-148.
  • ‘Power, Not Pity’: Poverty and Human Rights.Ruth Lister - 2013 - Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (2):109-123.
    ?Power, not pity? is a demand articulated by the Poor People's Economic Human Rights Campaign in the United States. The article discusses the ways in which some poverty activists are deploying an ethical discourse of human rights as a way of thinking about, talking about and mobilising against poverty and as a way of articulating concrete demands. They are staking a claim to power and to recognition as well as redistribution. It concludes that as an ethical discourse human rights performs (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark