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  1. ‘A Place of Great Trust to Be Supplied by Men of Skill and Integrity’: Assayers and Knowledge Cultures in Late Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century London.Jasmine Kilburn-Toppin - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Science 52 (2):197-223.
    This article suggests that institutional workshops of assay were significant experimental sites in early modern London. Master assayers at Goldsmiths’ Hall on Foster Lane, in the heart of the city, and at the Royal Mint, in the Tower, made trials to determine the precious-metal content of bullion, plate and coinage. The results of their metallurgical experiments directly impacted upon the reputations and livelihoods of London's goldsmiths and merchants, and the fineness of coin and bullion. Engaged in the separation and transformation (...)
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  • Toward a Sociology of Public Demonstrations.Claude Rosental - 2013 - Sociological Theory 31 (4):343-365.
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  • Who is the Scientist-Subject? A Critique of the Neo-Kantian Scientist-Subject in Lorraine Daston and Peter Galison’s Objectivity.Esha Shah - 2017 - Minerva 55 (1):117-138.
    The main focus of this essay is to closely engage with the role of scientist-subjectivity in the making of objectivity in Lorraine Daston and Peter Galison’s book Objectivity, and Daston’s later and earlier works On Scientific Observation and The Moral Economy of Science. I have posited four challenges to the neo-Kantian and Foucauldian constructions of the co-implication of psychology and epistemology presented in these texts. Firstly, following Jacques Lacan’s work, I have argued that the subject of science constituted by the (...)
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  • The Two Cultures of Electricity: Between Entertainment and Edification in Victorian Science.Iwan Rhys Morus - 2007 - Science & Education 16 (6):593-602.
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  • ‘Nature’ in the Laboratory: Domestication and Discipline with the Microscope in Victorian Life Science.Graeme Gooday - 1991 - British Journal for the History of Science 24 (3):307-341.
    What sort of activities took place in the academic laboratories developed for teaching the natural sciences in Britain between the 1860s and 1880s? What kind of social and instrumental regimes were implemented to make them meaningful and efficient venues of experimental instruction? As humanly constructed sites of experiment how were the metropolitan institutional contexts of these laboratories engineered to make them legitimate places to study ‘Nature’? Previous studies have documented chemists' effective use of regimented quantitative analysis in their laboratory teaching (...)
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  • Making a Meal of the Big Dish: The Construction of the Jodrell Bank Mark 1 Radio Telescope as a Stable Edifice, 1946–57.Jon Agar - 1994 - British Journal for the History of Science 27 (1):3-21.
    From a distance the Mark 1 radio telescope at Jodrell Bank is an edifying sight. It is a steel structure of over 1000 tons, holding aloft a fully steerable dish of wire mesh which focuses incoming radio waves from astronomical objects. It is set in gently rolling Cheshire countryside. Its striking appearance can easily be recruited as a powerful symbol of progress and of science as the pursuit of pioneering spirits.
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  • Laboratory Science Versus Country-House Experiments. The Controversy Between Julius Sachs and Charles Darwin.Soraya De Chadarevian - 1996 - British Journal for the History of Science 29 (1):17-41.
    In 1880, Charles Darwin published The Power of Movement in Plants, a heavy volume of nearly six hundred pages in which he presented the results of many years of experiments conducted with his son Francis on the reaction of plants to the influence of light and gravity. His results contradicted the observations and explanations of the same phenomena offered by the German plant physiologist Julius Sachs in his influential Lehrbuch der Botanik . Darwin wished rather to ‘convert him than any (...)
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  • Performance Practice: Music, Medicine and Natural Philosophy in Interregnum Oxford.Penelope Gouk - 1996 - British Journal for the History of Science 29 (3):257-288.
    A generation or so ago, scholarly discussion about the creation of new scientific knowledge in seventeenth-century England was often framed in terms of the respective contributions of scholars and practitioners, the effects of their training and background, the relative importance of the universities compared with London, and of the role of external and internal factors, and so forth. These discourses have now largely been put aside in favour of those emphasizing spatial metaphors and models, which are recognized as powerful conceptual (...)
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  • Instrumental Images: The Visual Rhetoric of Self-Presentation in Hevelius's Machina Coelestis.Janet Vertesi - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Science 43 (2):209-243.
    This article places the famous images of Johannes Hevelius's instruments in his Machina Coelestis in the context of Hevelius's contested cometary observations and his debate with Hooke over telescopic sights. Seen thus, the images promote a crafted vision of Hevelius's astronomical practice and skills, constituting a careful self-presentation to his distant professional network and a claim as to which instrumental techniques guarantee accurate observations. Reviewing the reception of the images, the article explores how visual rhetoric may be invoked and challenged (...)
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  • Recycling in Early Modern Science.Simon Werrett - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Science 46 (4):627-646.
    This essay follows recent work in environmental history to explore the history of recycling in physical sciences in Britain and North America since the seventeenth century. The term ‘recycling’ is here used broadly to refer to a variety of practices that extended the life of material resources for doing science in the early modern period. These included practices associated with maintenance, repair, exchange and the adaptation or reuse of material culture. The essay argues that such practices were common in early (...)
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  • Unrolling Egyptian Mummies in Nineteenth-Century Britain.Gabriel Moshenska - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Science 47 (3):451-477.
    The unrolling of Egyptian mummies was a popular spectacle in mid-nineteenth-century Britain. In hospitals, theatres, homes and learned institutions mummified bodies, brought from Egypt as souvenirs or curiosities, were opened and examined in front of rapt audiences. The scientific study of mummies emerged within the contexts of early nineteenth-century Egyptomania, particularly following the decipherment of hieroglyphics in 1822, and the changing attitudes towards medicine, anatomy and the corpse that led to the 1832 Anatomy Act. The best-known mummy unroller of this (...)
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  • Are There Scientific Goals?Gary Hardcastle - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 30 (3):297-311.
    This paper argues that, as all available accounts of how scientific and non-scientific goals might be distinguished rely upon distinctions as much in need of explication as the notion of scientific goals itself, naturalized accounts of science should reject the notion that there are characteristically scientific goals for a given time and place and instead countenance only the goals which happen to be had by individual scientists or their communities. This argument and the recommendation that follows from it are illustrated (...)
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  • Read. Do. Observe. Take Note!Elaine Leong - 2018 - Centaurus 60 (1-2):87-103.
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  • Pratique et preuve expérimentale en France au XVIIe siècle. L’émergence d’un modèle coopératif.Christian Licoppe - 1993 - Revue de Synthèse 114 (3-4):383-421.
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  • Senses of Localism.Jouni-Matti Kuukkanen - 2012 - History of Science 50 (4):477-500.
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  • Finders, Keepers: Collecting Sciences and Collecting Practice.Robert E. Kohler - 2007 - History of Science 45 (150):428-454.
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  • From Aperspectival Objectivity to Strong Objectivity: The Quest for Moral Objectivity.Jennifer Tannoch-Bland - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (1):155 - 178.
    Sandra Harding is working on the reconstruction of scientific objectivity. Lorraine Daston argues that objectivity is a concept that has historically evolved. Her account of the development of "aperspectival objectivity" provides an opportunity to see Harding's "strong objectivity" project as a stage in this evolution, to locate it in the history of migration of ideals from moral philosophy to natural science, and to support Harding's desire to retain something of the ontological significance of objectivity.
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  • Place and Practice in Field Biology.Robert E. Kohler - 2002 - History of Science 40 (2):189-210.
  • Separate Spheres and Public Places: Reflections on the History of Science Popularization and Science in Popular Culture.Roger Cooter & Stephen Pumfrey - 1994 - History of Science 32 (97):237-267.
  • In the Shadow of the Deconstructed Metanarratives : Baudrillard, Latour and the End of Realist Epistemology.Steven C. Ward - 1994 - History of the Human Sciences 7 (4):73-94.
  • Labscapes: Naturalizing the Lab.Robert E. Kohler - 2002 - History of Science 40 (130):473-501.
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  • A Place That Answers Questions: Primatological Field Sites and the Making of Authentic Observations.Amanda Rees - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (2):311-333.
    The ideals and realities of field research have shaped the development of behavioural primatology over the latter half of the twentieth century. This paper draws on interviews with primatologists as well as a survey of the scientific literature to examine the idealized notion of the field site as a natural place and the physical environment of the field as a research space. It shows that what became standard field practice emerged in the course of wide ranging debate about the techniques, (...)
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  • Healing the Nation's Wounds: Royal Ritual and Experimental Philosophy in Restoration England.Simon Werrett - 2000 - History of Science 38 (4):377-399.
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  • A Place That Answers Questions: Primatological Field Sites and the Making of Authentic Observations.Amanda Rees - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (2):311-333.
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  • Nature as Spectacle; Experience and Empiricism in Early Modern Experimental Practice.Mark Thomas Young - 2017 - Centaurus 59 (1-2):72-96.
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  • Microstudies Versus Big Picture Accounts?Soraya de Chadarevian - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 40 (1):13-19.
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  • Balancing Acts: Picturing Perspiration in the Long Eighteenth Century.Lucia Dacome - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (2):379-391.
  • The Women Radium Dial Painters as Experimental Subjects (1920–1990) or What Counts as Human Experimentation.Maria Rentetzi - 2004 - NTM Zeitschrift für Geschichte der Wissenschaften, Technik und Medizin 12 (4):233-248.
    The case of women radium dial painters — women who tipped their brushes while painting the dials of watches and instruments with radioactive paint — has been extensively discussed in the medical and historical literature. Their painful and abhorrent deaths have occupied the interest of physicians, lawyers, politicians, military agencies, and the public. Hardly any discussion has concerned, however, the use of those women as experimental subjects in a number of epidemiological studies that took place from 1920 to 1990. This (...)
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  • Surgery, Science and Modernity: Operating Rooms and Laboratories as Spaces of Control.Thomas Schlick - 2007 - History of Science 45 (3):231-256.
  • Into the Valley of Darkness: Reflections on the Royal Society in the Eighteenth Century.David P. Miller - 1989 - History of Science 27 (76):155-166.
  • Elizabeth Tollet: A New Newtonian Woman.Patricia Fara - 2002 - History of Science 40 (128):169-187.
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