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  1. Mysteries of Morality.Peter DeScioli & Robert Kurzban - 2009 - Cognition 112 (2):281-299.
    Evolutionary theories of morality, beginning with Darwin, have focused on explanations for altruism. More generally, these accounts have concentrated on conscience to the neglect of condemnation. As a result, few theoretical tools are available for understanding the rapidly accumulating data surrounding third-party judgment and punishment. Here we consider the strategic interactions among actors, victims, and third-parties to help illuminate condemnation. We argue that basic differences between the adaptive problems faced by actors and third-parties indicate that actor conscience and third-party condemnation (...)
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  • Exaptation Revisited: Changes Imposed by Evolutionary Psychologists and Behavioral Biologists.Elisabeth A. Lloyd & Stephen Jay Gould - 2017 - Biological Theory 12 (1):50-65.
    Some methodological adaptationists hijacked the term “exaptation,” and took an occasion of Stephen Jay Gould’s misspeaking as confirmation that it possessed an evolutionarily “designed” function and was a version of an adaptation, something it was decidedly not. Others provided a standard of evidence for exaptation that was inappropriate, and based on an adaptationist worldview. This article is intended to serve as both an analysis of and correction to those situations. Gould and Elisabeth Vrba’s terms, “exaptation” and “aptation,” as originally introduced, (...)
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  • Bergson and the Holographic Theory of Mind.Stephen E. Robbins - 2006 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (3-4):365-394.
    Bergson’s model of time (1889) is perhaps the proto-phenomenological theory. It is part of a larger model of mind (1896) which can be seen in modern light as describing the brain as supporting a modulated wave within a holographic field, specifying the external image of the world, and wherein subject and object are differentiated not in terms of space, but of time. Bergson’s very concrete model is developed and deepened with Gibson’s ecological model of perception. It is applied to the (...)
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  • Evolutionizing the Cognitive Sciences: A Reply to Shapiro and Epstein.John Tooby & Leda Cosmides - 1998 - Mind and Language 13 (2):195-204.
  • On the Functional Origins of Essentialism.H. Clark Barrett - 2001 - [Journal (Paginated)] (in Press) 2 (1):1-30.
    This essay examines the proposal that psychological essentialism results from a history of natural selection acting on human representation and inference systems. It has been argued that the features that distinguish essentialist representational systems are especially well suited for representing natural kinds. If the evolved function of essentialism is to exploit the rich inductive potential of such kinds, then it must be subserved by cognitive mechanisms that carry out at least three distinct functions: identifying these kinds in the environment, constructing (...)
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  • Common Minds, Uncommon Thoughts: A Philosophical Anthropological Investigation of Uniquely Human Creative Behavior, with an Emphasis on Artistic Ability, Religious Reflection, and Scientific Study.Johan De Smedt - unknown
    The aim of this dissertation is to create a naturalistic philosophical picture of creative capacities that are specific to our species, focusing on artistic ability, religious reflection, and scientific study. By integrating data from diverse domains within a philosophical anthropological framework, I have presented a cognitive and evolutionary approach to the question of why humans, but not other animals engage in such activities. Through an application of cognitive and evolutionary perspectives to the study of these behaviors, I have sought to (...)
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  • Knowing How and Pragmatic Intrusion.Alessandro Capone - 2011 - Intercultural Pragmatics 8 (4):543-570.
  • Beyond Intuition and Instinct Blindness: Toward an Evolutionary Rigorous Cognitive Science.Leda Cosmides & John Tooby - 1994 - Cognition 50 (1-3):41-77.
  • Accommodating Unconscious Beliefs.Luis M. Augusto - 2010 - Princípios 17 (28):129-154.
    More often than not, theories of belief and of belief ascription restrict themselves to conscious beliefs, thus obliterating a vast part of our mental life and offering extremely incomplete, unrealistic theories. Indeed, conscious beliefs are the exception, not the rule, as far as human doxastic states are concerned, and a naturalistic, realistic theory of knowledge that aspires to completeness has to take unconscious beliefs into consideration. This paper is the elaboration of such a theory of belief.
     
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  • Dynamical Evolutionary Psychology: Individual Decision Rules and Emergent Social Norms.Douglas T. Kenrick, Norman P. Li & Jonathan Butner - 2003 - Psychological Review 110 (1):3-28.
  • Modeling Hippocampal and Neocortical Contributions to Recognition Memory: A Complementary-Learning-Systems Approach.Kenneth A. Norman & Randall C. O'Reilly - 2003 - Psychological Review 110 (4):611-646.
  • Reenacting the Route to Interpretation: Enhanced Perceptual Identification Without Prior Perception.Michael E. J. Masson & Colin M. MacLeod - 1992 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 121 (2):145-176.
  • ‘Neuroecologists’ Are Not Made of Straw.Robert R. Hampton, Susan D. Healy, Sara J. Shettleworth & Alan C. Kamil - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (1):6-7.
  • Complementary Learning Systems.Randall C. O’Reilly, Rajan Bhattacharyya, Michael D. Howard & Nicholas Ketz - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1229-1248.
    This paper reviews the fate of the central ideas behind the complementary learning systems (CLS) framework as originally articulated in McClelland, McNaughton, and O’Reilly (1995). This framework explains why the brain requires two differentially specialized learning and memory systems, and it nicely specifies their central properties (i.e., the hippocampus as a sparse, pattern-separated system for rapidly learning episodic memories, and the neocortex as a distributed, overlapping system for gradually integrating across episodes to extract latent semantic structure). We review the application (...)
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  • The Ontogenesis of Human Identity.Giovanni Boniolo - 2005 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 56:5-6.
    “ >. Das hiess doch: Wenn du dir gewisse Tatsachen anders denkst,sie anders beschreibst, als sie sind, dann kannst du die Anwendung gewisser Begriffe dir nicht mehr vorstellen, weil die Regeln ihrer Anwendung kein Analogon unter den neuen Umständen haben.”.
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  • Hippocampal and Neocortical Contributions to Memory: Advances in the Complementary Learning Systems Framework.Randall C. O'Reilly & Kenneth A. Norman - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (12):505-510.
  • Implicit Memory: A Commentary.Henry L. Roediger - 1990 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (4):373-380.
  • Analogical Reminding and the Storage of Experience: The Paradox of Hofstadter-Sander.Stephen E. Robbins - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (3):355-385.
    In their exhaustive study of the cognitive operation of analogy, Hofstadter and Sander arrive at a paradox: the creative and inexhaustible production of analogies in our thought must derive from a “reminding” operation based upon the availability of the detailed totality of our experience. Yet the authors see no way that our experience can be stored in the brain in such detail nor do they see how such detail could be accessed or retrieved such that the innumerable analogical remindings we (...)
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  • Empirical Evidence and the Knowledge-That/Knowledge-How Distinction.Marcus P. Adams - 2009 - Synthese 170 (1):97-114.
    In this article I have two primary goals. First, I present two recent views on the distinction between knowledge-that and knowledge-how (Stanley and Williamson, The Journal of Philosophy 98(8):411–444, 2001; Hetherington, Epistemology futures, 2006). I contend that neither of these provides conclusive arguments against the distinction. Second, I discuss studies from neuroscience and experimental psychology that relate to this distinction. Having examined these studies, I then defend a third view that explains certain relevant data from these studies by positing the (...)
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  • Shadow People: Relational Personhood, Extended Diachronic Personal Identity, and Our Moral Obligations Toward Fragile Persons.Bartlomiej Lenart - 2014 - Dissertation, University of Alberta
    This Dissertation argues for a care-centrically grounded account of relational personhood and widely realized diachronic personal identity. The moral distinction between persons and non-persons is arguably one of the most salient ethical lines we can draw since many of our most fundamental rights are delineated via the bounds of personhood. The problem with drawing such morally salient lines is that the orthodox, rationalistic definition of personhood, which is widespread within philosophical, medical, and colloquial spheres, excludes, and thereby de-personifies, a large (...)
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  • Numerical Competence: From Backwater to Mainstream of Comparative Psychology.Hank Davis & Rachelle Pérusse - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):602-615.
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  • Difficulties of Demonstrating the Possession of Concepts.Ernst von Glasersfeld - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):601-602.
  • To Honor Davis & Pérusse and Repeal Their Glossary of Processes of Numerical Competence.Roger K. Thomas - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):600-600.
  • Problems of Axiomatics and Complexity in Studying Numerical Competence in Animals.Patrick Suppes - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):599-599.
  • Possibilities for the Construction of a Sense of Number by Animals.Leslie P. Steffe - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):598-599.
  • Are Animals Naturally Attuned to Number?Uta Seibt - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):597-598.
  • Language and Counting in Animals: Stimulus Classes and Equivalence Relations.Ronald J. Schusterman - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):596-597.
  • Studying Numerical Competence: A Trip Through Linguistic Wonderland?Irene M. Pepperberg - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):595-596.
  • Reinforcement Schedules and “Numerical Competence”.John A. Nevin - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):594-595.
  • Is It the Thought That Counts?Brendan McGonigle - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):593-594.
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  • You Can't Succeed Without Really Counting.Euan M. Macphail - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):592-593.
  • Numbers and Counting: Intuitionistic and Gestalt Psychological Viewpoints.Abraham S. Luchins & Edith H. Luchins - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):591-592.
  • Number Reckoning Strategies: A Basis for Distinction.Eugene C. Lechelt - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):590-591.
  • Number Concepts in Animals: A Multidimensional Array.James E. King - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):590-590.
  • Human Versus Nonhuman Abilities: Is There a Difference Which Really Counts?Annette Karmiloff-Smith - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):589-590.
  • Out for the Count.Mark Johnson - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):589-589.
  • Definitional Constraints and Experimental Realities.Fabio Idrobo & David I. Mostofsky - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):588-588.
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  • The Magical Number Four, Plus or Minus One: Working Memory for Numbers of Items in Animals.W. K. Honig - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):587-588.
  • Counting as a Social Practice.Angus R. H. Gellatly - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):586-587.
  • Counting Versus Subitizing Versus the Sense of Number.C. R. Gallistel - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):585-586.
  • Some Further Clarifications of Numerical Terminology Using Results From Young Children.Karen C. Fuson - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):583-585.
  • Human Infants Are Perhaps Not so Gifted After All.Bernadette Chauvin - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):583-583.
  • A Different View of Numerical Processes in Animals.E. J. Capaldi & Daniel J. Miller - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):582-583.
  • Subitizing and Rhythm in Serial Numerical Investigations with Animals.Richard A. Burns - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):581-582.
  • Protocounting as a Last Resort.Richard F. Braaten - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):581-581.
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  • Kanting Processes in the Chimpanzee: What Really Counts?Sarah T. Boysen - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):580-580.
  • Numerical Competence in Animals: Definitional Issues, Current Evidence, and a New Research Agenda.Hank Davis & Rachelle Pérusse - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):561-579.
  • On the Evolution of Representational Capacities.Merlin Donald - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):775-791.
  • External Representation: An Issue for Cognition.Jiajie Zhang - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):774-775.
  • Archaeological Evidence for Mimetic Mind and Culture.Thomas Wynn - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):774-774.