Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Mou Zongsan on Zen Buddhism.Chan Wing-Cheuk - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):73-88.
  • An Introduction to the Dunhuang Manuscript of the Platform Sutra: Facts or Legends?Jizhang Yi - 2020 - Cultural China 104 (3):37-44.
    As more and more scholars deepened the study of the Dunhuang version of The Platform Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch, many significant research questions were raised. The questions such as when the book was completed, who actually wrote the book, and the historical authenticity of Huineng’s story, especially his identity of the Sixth Patriarch, were extensively discussed and questioned by many scholars. This essay attempts to conduct a more profound analysis and thinking based on the current academic studies with respect (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Mysticism of Chan/Zen Enlightenment: A Rational Understanding Through Practices.Ming Dong Gu & Jianping Guo - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (2):235-251.
    There exists a widely accepted opinion in Chan/Zen 禪 studies that Chan enlightenment is a mysterium ineffabile, impenetrable by human intellect. Reviewing the debate between Hu Shi 胡適 and D. T. Suzuki over Chan enlightenment and accounts of testimony by Chan masters and practitioners in history, this essay argues that Chan enlightenment can be understood rationally and intellectually. By analyzing the time-honored Chan practices that have led to enlightenment, it seeks to understand the mystery as an extraordinary mental condition in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Technology of Awakening: Experiments in Zen Phenomenology.Brentyn Ramm - 2021 - Religions 12 (3):192.
    In this paper, I investigate the phenomenology of awakening in Chinese Zen Buddhism. In this tradition, to awaken is to ‘see your true nature’. In particular, the two aspects of awakening are: (1) seeing that the nature of one’s self or mind is empty or void and (2) an erasing of the usual (though merely apparent) boundary between subject and object. In the early Zen tradition, there are many references to awakening as chopping off your head, not having eyes, nose (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Continuing Relevance of Congruent/Incongruent Names Revealed by Buddhist Epistemology.Sandra A. Wawrytko - 2020 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 19 (4):625-633.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Teaching Beyond Words: ‘Silence’ and its Pedagogical Implications Discoursed in the Early Classical Texts of Confucianism, Daoism and Zen Buddhism.Lin Li - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 52 (7):759-768.
    In traditional Chinese philosophy, silence occupies a pivotal position by not being merely treated as the absence of speech, but also as the transcendence of it. Silence in early Confuciani...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Critical Survey of Works on Zen Since Yampolsky.Steven Heine - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (4):577-592.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Mou Zongsan on Zen Buddhism.Chan Wing-Cheuk - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):73-88.
  • The Role of History in Chan/Zen Enlightenment.Tao Jiang - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (1):1-14.