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  1. The Spatio-Legal Production of Bodies Through the Legal Fiction of Death.Joshua David Michael Shaw - 2021 - Law and Critique 32 (1):69-90.
    Definitions of death are often referred to as legal fictions since brain death was conceived in the mid-twentieth century. Reference to legal fiction is generally paired with bioethicists’ concern that it facilitates post-mortem tissue donation and the health system generally, by determining death earlier on the continuum of dying and availing more viable tissue and therapeutic resources for others. The author argues that spatio-legal theory, drawing from legal geography, can account for the heterogeneity of effects that the fiction has in (...)
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  • Waiting, Strange: Transplant Recipient Experience, Medical Time and Queer/Crip Temporalities.Sara Wasson - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012141.
    People who receive a ‘solid’ organ transplant from a deceased person may experience imaginative challenges in making sense of how the transfer impacts their own past and future, as shown in existing scholarship. Building on such work, this article considers how the temporalities of medical encounter itself may also become temporally ambiguous, posing representational challenges both pre-transplantation and post-transplantation. The dominant narrative of transplant in transplantation journals and hospital communications, both clinical and patient-facing, presents surgery as a healing moment, yet (...)
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  • Ka Mura Ka Muri: Understandings of Organ Donation and Transplantation in Aotearoa New Zealand.Rhonda Shaw & Robert Webb - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2020-012038.
    In this article, we refer to the separation of solid organs from the body as bio-objects. We suggest that the transfer of these bio-objects is connected to emotions and affects that carry a range of different social and cultural meanings specific to the context of Aotearoa New Zealand. The discussion draws on research findings from a series of qualitative indepth interview studies conducted from 2008 to 2013 with Māori and Pākehā concerning their views on organ donation and transplantation. Our findings (...)
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  • Hauntological Dimensions of Heart Transplantation: The Onto-Epistemologies of Deceased Donation.Margrit Shildrick - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2020-011982.
    The practice of human organ transplantation studies is shot through with questions concerning the concepts of selfhood and identity that continually reach out towards transmigration, displacement and haunting. In particular, heart transplantation is the site at which the parameters of human life and death are tested to their limits, not simply for the recipient but for the donor too. In conventional biomedicine, the definition and therefore the moment of death is a matter of ongoing and disturbing dispute between two major (...)
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  • The New Biologies: Epigenetics, the Microbiome and Immunities.Lisa Blackman - 2016 - Body and Society 22 (4):3-18.
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  • Messy Entanglements: Research Assemblages in Heart Transplantation Discourses and Practices.Margrit Shildrick, Andrew Carnie, Alexa Wright, Patricia McKeever, Emily Huan-Ching Jan, Enza De Luca, Ingrid Bachmann, Susan Abbey, Dana Dal Bo, Jennifer Poole, Tammer El-Sheikh & Heather Ross - 2018 - Medical Humanities 44 (1):46-54.
    The paper engages with a variety of data around a supposedly single biomedical event, that of heart transplantation. In conventional discourse, organ transplantation constitutes an unproblematised form of spare part surgery in which failing biological components are replaced by more efficient and enduring ones, but once that simple picture is complicated by employing a radically interdisciplinary approach, any biomedical certainty is profoundly disrupted. Our aim, as a cross-sectorial partnership, has been to explore the complexities of heart transplantation by explicitly entangling (...)
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