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  1. The Social Motivation Hypothesis for Prosocial Behavior.M. Nagatsu, M. Salmela & Marion Godman - 2014 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (5):563-587.
    Existing economic models of prosociality have been rather silent in terms of proximate psychological mechanisms. We nevertheless identify the psychologically most informed accounts and offer a critical discussion of their hypotheses for the proximate psychological explanations. Based on convergent evidence from several fields of research, we argue that there nevertheless is a more plausible alternative proximate account available: the social motivation hypothesis. The hypothesis represents a more basic explanation of the appeal of prosocial behavior, which is in terms of anticipated (...)
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  • Perception and the Problem of Access to Other Minds.Nivedita Gangopadhyay & Katsunori Miyahara - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (5):695-714.
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  • Extended Cognition and the Space of Social Interaction.Joel Krueger - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):643-657.
    The extended mind thesis (EM) asserts that some cognitive processes are (partially) composed of actions consisting of the manipulation and exploitation of environmental structures. Might some processes at the root of social cognition have a similarly extended structure? In this paper, I argue that social cognition is fundamentally an interactive form of space management—the negotiation and management of ‘‘we-space”—and that some of the expressive actions involved in the negotiation and management of we-space (gesture, touch, facial and whole-body expressions) drive basic (...)
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  • Effects on Inter-Personal Memory of Dancing in Time with Others.Matthew H. Woolhouse, Dan Tidhar & Ian Cross - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Inhibitory Control and L2 Proficiency Modulate Bilingual Language Production: Evidence From Spontaneous Monologue and Dialogue Speech.Irina Pivneva, Caroline Palmer & Debra Titone - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  • Behavior Matching in Multimodal Communication is Synchronized.Max M. Louwerse, Rick Dale, Ellen G. Bard & Patrick Jeuniaux - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (8):1404-1426.
    A variety of theoretical frameworks predict the resemblance of behaviors between two people engaged in communication, in the form of coordination, mimicry, or alignment. However, little is known about the time course of the behavior matching, even though there is evidence that dyads synchronize oscillatory motions (e.g., postural sway). This study examined the temporal structure of nonoscillatory actions—language, facial, and gestural behaviors—produced during a route communication task. The focus was the temporal relationship between matching behaviors in the interlocutors (e.g., facial (...)
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  • Embodied Attention and Word Learning by Toddlers.Chen Yu & Linda B. Smith - 2012 - Cognition 125 (2):244-262.
  • Pragmatic Choice in Conversation.Raymond W. Gibbs & Guy Van Orden - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):7-20.
    How do people decide what to say in context? Many theories of pragmatics assume that people have specialized knowledge that drives them to utter certain words in different situations. But these theories are mostly unable to explain both the regularity and variability in people’s speech behaviors. Our purpose in this article is to advance a view of pragmatics based on complexity theory, which specifically explains the pragmatic choices speakers make in conversations. The concept of self-organized criticality sheds light on how (...)
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  • Naturalizing Joint Action: A Process-Based Approach.Deborah Tollefsen & Rick Dale - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (3):385-407.
    Numerous philosophical theories of joint agency and its intentional structure have been developed in the past few decades. These theories have offered accounts of joint agency that appeal to higher-level states that are?shared? in some way. These accounts have enhanced our understanding of joint agency, yet there are a number of lower-level cognitive phenomena involved in joint action that philosophers rarely acknowledge. In particular, empirical research in cognitive science has revealed that when individuals engage in a joint activity such as (...)
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  • No Need for Instinct: Coordinated Communication as an Emergent Self Organized Process.Raymond W. Gibbs & Nathaniel Clark - 2012 - Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (2):241-262.
    Language serves many purposes in our individual lives and our varied interpersonal interactions. Daniel Everett's claim that language primarily emerges from an “interactional instinct“ and not a classic “language instinct“ gives proper weight to the importance of coordinated communication in meeting our adaptive needs. Yet the argument that language is a “cultural tool“, motivated by an underlying “instinct“, does not adequately explain the complex, yet complementary nature of both linguistic regularities and variations in everyday speech. Our alternative suggestion is that (...)
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  • The Dynamics of Reference and Shared Visual Attention.Rick Dale, Natasha Z. Kirkham & Daniel C. Richardson - 2011 - Frontiers in Psychology 2.
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  • Keep Meaning in Conversational Coordination.Elena C. Cuffari - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Sense of Place, Fast and Slow: The Potential Contributions of Affordance Theory to Sense of Place.Christopher M. Raymond, Marketta Kyttä & Richard Stedman - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Complex Communication Dynamics: Exploring the Structure of an Academic Talk.Camila Alviar, Rick Dale & Alexia Galati - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (3):e12718.
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  • Multiple Sensory‐Motor Pathways Lead to Coordinated Visual Attention.Chen Yu & Linda B. Smith - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S1):5-31.
    Joint attention has been extensively studied in the developmental literature because of overwhelming evidence that the ability to socially coordinate visual attention to an object is essential to healthy developmental outcomes, including language learning. The goal of this study was to understand the complex system of sensory-motor behaviors that may underlie the establishment of joint attention between parents and toddlers. In an experimental task, parents and toddlers played together with multiple toys. We objectively measured joint attention—and the sensory-motor behaviors that (...)
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  • Creating Time: Social Collaboration in Music Improvisation.Ashley E. Walton, Auriel Washburn, Peter Langland‐Hassan, Anthony Chemero, Heidi Kloos & Michael J. Richardson - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (1):95-119.
    Musical collaboration emerges from the complex interaction of environmental and informational constraints, including those of the instruments and the performance context. Music improvisation in particular is more like everyday interaction in that dynamics emerge spontaneously without a rehearsed score or script. We examined how the structure of the musical context affords and shapes interactions between improvising musicians. Six pairs of professional piano players improvised with two different backing tracks while we recorded both the music produced and the movements of their (...)
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  • Overhearers Use Addressee Backchannels in Dialog Comprehension.Jackson Tolins & Jean E. Fox Tree - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (6):1412-1434.
    Observing others in conversation is a common format for comprehending language, yet little work has been done to understand dialog comprehension. We tested whether overhearers use addressee backchannels as predictive cues for how to integrate information across speaker turns during comprehension of spontaneously produced collaborative narration. In Experiment 1, words that followed specific backchannels were recognized more slowly than words that followed either generic backchannels or pauses. In Experiment 2, we found that when the turn after the backchannel was a (...)
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  • Linking Cognitive and Social Aspects of Sound Change Using Agent‐Based Modeling.Jonathan Harrington, Felicitas Kleber, Ulrich Reubold, Florian Schiel & Mary Stevens - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (4):707-728.
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  • Interactive Team Cognition.Nancy J. Cooke, Jamie C. Gorman, Christopher W. Myers & Jasmine L. Duran - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (2):255-285.
    Cognition in work teams has been predominantly understood and explained in terms of shared cognition with a focus on the similarity of static knowledge structures across individual team members. Inspired by the current zeitgeist in cognitive science, as well as by empirical data and pragmatic concerns, we offer an alternative theory of team cognition. Interactive Team Cognition (ITC) theory posits that (1) team cognition is an activity, not a property or a product; (2) team cognition should be measured and studied (...)
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  • Conversation, Gaze Coordination, and Beliefs About Visual Context.Daniel C. Richardson, Rick Dale & John M. Tomlinson - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (8):1468-1482.
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  • Alignment, Transactive Memory, and Collective Cognitive Systems.Deborah P. Tollefsen, Rick Dale & Alexandra Paxton - 2013 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (1):49-64.
    Research on linguistic interaction suggests that two or more individuals can sometimes form adaptive and cohesive systems. We describe an “alignment system” as a loosely interconnected set of cognitive processes that facilitate social interactions. As a dynamic, multi-component system, it is responsive to higher-level cognitive states such as shared beliefs and intentions (those involving collective intentionality) but can also give rise to such shared cognitive states via bottom-up processes. As an example of putative group cognition we turn to transactive memory (...)
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  • How Does It Really Feel to Act Together? Shared Emotions and the Phenomenology of We-Agency.Mikko Salmela & Michiru Nagatsu - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (3):449-470.
    Research on the phenomenology of agency for joint action has so far focused on the sense of agency and control in joint action, leaving aside questions on how it feels to act together. This paper tries to fill this gap in a way consistent with the existing theories of joint action and shared emotion. We first reconstruct Pacherie’s account on the phenomenology of agency for joint action, pointing out its two problems, namely the necessary trade-off between the sense of self- (...)
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  • Action, Mindreading and Embodied Social Cognition.Joshua Shepherd - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):507-518.
    One of the central insights of the embodied cognition (EC) movement is that cognition is closely tied to action. In this paper, I formulate an EC-inspired hypothesis concerning social cognition. In this domain, most think that our capacity to understand and interact with one another is best explained by appeal to some form of mindreading. I argue that prominent accounts of mindreading likely contain a significant lacuna. Evidence indicates that what I call an agent’s actional processes and states—her goals, needs, (...)
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  • Performance in a Collaborative Search Task: The Role of Feedback and Alignment.Moreno I. Coco, Rick Dale & Frank Keller - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (1):55-79.
    When people communicate, they coordinate a wide range of linguistic and non-linguistic behaviors. This process of coordination is called alignment, and it is assumed to be fundamental to successful communication. In this paper, we question this assumption and investigate whether disalignment is a more successful strategy in some cases. More specifically, we hypothesize that alignment correlates with task success only when communication is interactive. We present results from a spot-the-difference task in which dyads of interlocutors have to decide whether they (...)
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  • Learning From the Body About the Mind.Michael A. Riley, Kevin Shockley & Guy van Orden - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):21-34.
    In some areas of cognitive science we are confronted with ultrafast cognition, exquisite context sensitivity, and scale-free variation in measured cognitive activities. To move forward, we suggest a need to embrace this complexity, equipping cognitive science with tools and concepts used in the study of complex dynamical systems. The science of movement coordination has benefited already from this change, successfully circumventing analogous paradoxes by treating human activities as phenomena of self-organization. Therein, action and cognition are seen to be emergent in (...)
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  • Editor's Introduction and Review: Coordination and Context in Cognitive Science.Christopher T. Kello - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (1):6-17.
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  • Can Social Interaction Constitute Social Cognition?Hanne De Jaegher, Ezequiel Di Paolo & Shaun Gallagher - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (10):441-447.
    An important shift is taking place in social cognition research, away from a focus on the individual mind and toward embodied and participatory aspects of social understanding. Empirical results already imply that social cognition is not reducible to the workings of individual cognitive mechanisms. To galvanize this interactive turn, we provide an operational definition of social interaction and distinguish the different explanatory roles – contextual, enabling and constitutive – it can play in social cognition. We show that interactive processes are (...)
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  • Social Constraints From an Observer’s Perspective: Coordinated Actions Make an Agent’s Position More Predictable.Jun Yin, Haokui Xu, Xiaowei Ding, Junying Liang, Rende Shui & Mowei Shen - 2016 - Cognition 151:10-17.
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  • Perception and the Problem of Access to Other Minds.Nivedita Gangopadhyay & Katsunori Miyahara - 2014 - Philosophical Psychology (5):1-20.
    In opposition to mainstream theory of mind approaches, some contemporary perceptual accounts of social cognition do not consider the central question of social cognition to be the problem of access to other minds. These perceptual accounts draw heavily on phenomenological philosophy and propose that others' mental states are “directly” given in the perception of the others' expressive behavior. Furthermore, these accounts contend that phenomenological insights into the nature of social perception lead to the dissolution of the access problem. We argue, (...)
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