Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Effect of Abstract Versus Concrete Framing on Judgments of Biological and Psychological Bases of Behavior.Kim Nancy, Samuel Johnson, Woo-Kyoung Ahn & Joshua Knobe - forthcoming - Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications.
    Human behavior is frequently described both in abstract, general terms and in concrete, specific terms. We asked whether these two ways of framing equivalent behaviors shift the inferences people make about the biological and psychological bases of those behaviors. In five experiments, we manipulated whether behaviors are presented concretely (i.e. with reference to a specific person, instantiated in the particular context of that person’s life) or abstractly (i.e. with reference to a category of people or behaviors across generalized contexts). People (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Skepticism and the Acquisition of “Knowledge”.Shaun Nichols & N. Ángel Pinillos - 2018 - Mind and Language 33 (4):397-414.
    Do you know you are not being massively deceived by an evil demon? That is a familiar skeptical challenge. Less familiar is this question: How do you have a conception of knowledge on which the evil demon constitutes a prima facie challenge? Recently several philosophers have suggested that our responses to skeptical scenarios can be explained in terms of heuristics and biases. We offer an alternative explanation, based in learning theory. We argue that, given the evidence available to the learner, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Thinking Like a Scientist: Innateness as a Case Study.Joshua Knobe & Richard Samuels - 2013 - Cognition 126 (1):72-86.
    The concept of innateness appears in systematic research within cognitive science, but it also appears in less systematic modes of thought that long predate the scientific study of the mind. The present studies therefore explore the relationship between the properly scientific uses of this concept and its role in ordinary folk understanding. Studies 1-4 examined the judgments of people with no specific training in cognitive science. Results showed (a) that judgments about whether a trait was innate were not affected by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • How Children and Adults Represent God's Mind.Larisa Heiphetz, Jonathan D. Lane, Adam Waytz & Liane L. Young - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (1):121-144.
    For centuries, humans have contemplated the minds of gods. Research on religious cognition is spread across sub-disciplines, making it difficult to gain a complete understanding of how people reason about gods' minds. We integrate approaches from cognitive, developmental, and social psychology and neuroscience to illuminate the origins of religious cognition. First, we show that although adults explicitly discriminate supernatural minds from human minds, their implicit responses reveal far less discrimination. Next, we demonstrate that children's religious cognition often matches adults' implicit (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Recontextualizing Dance Skills: Overcoming Impediments to Motor Learning and Expressivity in Ballet Dancers.Janet Karin - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    The process of transmitting ballet’s complex technique to young dancers can interfere with the innate processes that give rise to efficient, expressive and harmonious movement. With the intention of identifying possible solutions, this article draws on research across the fields of neurology, psychology, motor learning, and education, and considers their relevance to ballet as an art form, a technique, and a training methodology. The integration of dancers’ technique and expressivity is a core theme throughout the paper. A brief outline of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Illusions of Causality: How They Bias Our Everyday Thinking and How They Could Be Reduced.Helena Matute, Fernando Blanco, Ion Yarritu, Marcos Díaz-Lago, Miguel A. Vadillo & Itxaso Barberia - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Learning About Archaeology and Prehistoric Life.M. Besse, S. Fragnière, A. Müller, M. Piguet, L. Dubois, D. Miéville, S. Schoeb & D. Schumacher - forthcoming - Science & Education.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Hauntings, Homeopathy, and the Hopkinsville Goblins: Using Pseudoscience to Teach Scientific Thinking.Rodney Schmaltz & Scott O. Lilienfeld - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Attributes of God: Conceptual Foundations of a Foundational Belief.Andrew Shtulman & Marjaana Lindeman - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (3):635-670.
    Anthropomorphism, or the attribution of human properties to nonhuman entities, is often posited as an explanation for the origin and nature of God concepts, but it remains unclear which human properties we tend to attribute to God and under what conditions. In three studies, participants decided whether two types of human properties—psychological properties and physiological properties—could or could not be attributed to God. In Study 1, participants made significantly more psychological attributions than physiological attributions, and the frequency of those attributions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Ethics of Belief, Cognition, and Climate Change Pseudoskepticism: Implications for Public Discourse.Lawrence Torcello - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):19-48.
    The relationship between knowledge, belief, and ethics is an inaugural theme in philosophy; more recently, under the title “ethics of belief” philosophers have worked to develop the appropriate methodology for studying the nexus of epistemology, ethics, and psychology. The title “ethics of belief” comes from a 19th-century paper written by British philosopher and mathematician W.K. Clifford. Clifford argues that we are morally responsible for our beliefs because each belief that we form creates the cognitive circumstances for related beliefs to follow, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • How Lay Cognition Constrains Scientific Cognition.Andrew Shtulman - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (11):785-798.
    Scientific cognition is a hard-won achievement, both from a historical point of view and a developmental point of view. Here, I review seven facets of lay cognition that run counter to, and often impede, scientific cognition: incompatible folk theories, missing ontologies, tolerance for shallow explanations, tolerance for contradictory explanations, privileging explanation over empirical data, privileging testimony over empirical data, and misconceiving the nature of science itself. Most of these facets have been investigated independent of the others, and I propose directions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Anthropocentric by Default? Attribution of Familiar and Novel Properties to Living Things.Melanie Arenson & John D. Coley - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (1):253-285.
    Humans naturally and effortlessly use a set of cognitive tools to reason about biological entities and phenomena. Two such tools, essentialist thinking and teleological thinking, appear to be early developmental cognitive defaults, used extensively in childhood and under limited circumstances in adulthood, but prone to reemerge under time pressure or cognitive load. We examine the nature of another such tool: anthropocentric thinking. In four experiments, we examined patterns of property attribution to a wide range of living and non-living objects, manipulating (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Tensions Between Science and Intuition Across the Lifespan.Andrew Shtulman & Kelsey Harrington - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):118-137.
    The scientific knowledge needed to engage with policy issues like climate change, vaccination, and stem cell research often conflicts with our intuitive theories of the world. How resilient are our intuitive theories in the face of contradictory scientific knowledge? Here, we present evidence that intuitive theories in 10 domains of knowledge—astronomy, evolution, fractions, genetics, germs, matter, mechanics, physiology, thermodynamics, and waves—persist more than four decades beyond the acquisition of a mutually exclusive scientific theory. Participants were asked to verify two types (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Recruitment of Shifting and Inhibition in On‐Line Science and Mathematics Tasks.Stella Vosniadou, Dimitrios Pnevmatikos, Nikos Makris, Despina Lepenioti, Kalliopi Eikospentaki, Anna Chountala & Giorgos Kyrianakis - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (6):1860-1886.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Core Intuitions About Persons Coexist and Interfere With Acquired Christian Beliefs About God.Barlev Michael, Mermelstein Spencer & C. German Tamsin - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S3).
    This study tested the hypothesis that in the minds of adult religious adherents, acquired beliefs about the extraordinary characteristics of God coexist with, rather than replace, an initial representation of God formed by co-option of the evolved person concept. In three experiments, Christian religious adherents were asked to evaluate a series of statements for which core intuitions about persons and acquired Christian beliefs about God were consistent or inconsistent. Participants were less accurate and slower to respond to inconsistent versus consistent (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Healing, Mental Energy in the Physics Classroom: Energy Conceptions and Trust in Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Grade 10–12 Students. [REVIEW]Annika M. Svedholm & Marjaana Lindeman - 2013 - Science & Education 22 (3):677-694.
  • Override the Controversy: Analytic Thinking Predicts Endorsement of Evolution.Will M. Gervais - 2015 - Cognition 142:312-321.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Divided Mind of a Disbeliever: Intuitive Beliefs About Nature as Purposefully Created Among Different Groups of Non-Religious Adults.Elisa Järnefelt, Caitlin F. Canfield & Deborah Kelemen - 2015 - Cognition 140:72-88.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations