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  1. Knowledge, Belief, and Science Education.Waldomiro Silva Filho, Tiago Ferreira & El-Hani Charbel - 2016 - Canadian Journal of Bioethics / Revue canadienne de bioéthique (00):1-21.
    This article intends to show that the defense of ‘‘understanding’’ as one of the major goals of science education can be grounded on an anti-reductionist perspective on testimony as a source of knowledge. To do so, we critically revisit the discussion between Harvey Siegel and Alvin Goldman about the goals of science education, especially where it involves arguments based on the epistemology of testimony. Subsequently, we come back to a discussion between Charbel N. El-Hani and Eduardo Mortimer, on the one (...)
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  • Reasons and Normativity in Critical Thinking.Guðmundur Heiðar Frímannsson - 2016 - Studier i Pædagogisk Filosofi 4 (1):3-16.
    The reasons conception is the most prominent account of the nature of critical thinking. It consists in responding appropriately to reasons. Responding to reasons can be following a rule, it can be making an exception to a rule, it can be responding to a situation that is unique. It depends on the context each time what is the appropriate response. Critical thinking is the educational cognate of rationality and is a sine qua non for a reasonable life in a modern (...)
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  • Goldman and Siegel on the Epistemic Aims of Education.Alessia Marabini & Luca Moretti - manuscript
    Philosophers have claimed that education aims at fostering disparate epistemic goals. In this paper we focus on an important segment of this debate involving conversation between Alvin Goldman and Harvey Siegel. Goldman claims that education is essentially aimed at producing true beliefs. Siegel contends that education is essentially aimed at fostering both true beliefs and, independently, critical thinking and rational belief. Although we find Siegel’s position intuitively more plausible than Goldman’s, we also find Siegel’s defence of it wanting. We suggest (...)
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  • Trust and Critical Thinking.John Kleinig - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):133-143.
    This article discusses the tension between trust, as an expression of interpersonal commitment, and critical thinking, which includes a demand for reasons. It explores the importance of each for individual flourishing, and then seeks to establish some ways in which they intersect, drawing on ideas of authority and trustworthiness. It argues that despite the appearance of a deep tension between trust and critical thinking, they are importantly interdependent: if trust is to be warranted, critical thinking to determine trustworthiness is required; (...)
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  • Fairtrade in Schools: Teaching Ethics or Unlawful Marketing to the Defenceless?Peter Griffiths - 2014 - Ethics and Education 9 (3):369-384.
    Schools in the UK teach pupils about Fairtrade as part of Religious Education, Personal and Social Education, Citizenship, Geography and so on. There are also Fairtrade Schools, where the whole school, including staff and parents, is committed to promoting the brand. It is argued here that promoting this commercial brand to schoolchildren and using the schoolchildren to press adults to buy a product amounts to indoctrination using criteria of intent, methods of teaching and the subject matter. This conflicts with educational (...)
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  • Epistemology and Education: An Incomplete Guide to the Social-Epistemological Issues.Harvey Siegel - 2004 - Episteme 1 (2):129-137.
    Recent work in epistemology has focused increasingly on the social dimensions of knowledge and inquiry. Education is one important social arena in which knowledge plays a leading role, and in which knowledge-claims are presented, analyzed, evaluated, and transmitted. Philosophers of education have long attended to the epistemological issues raised by the theory and practice of education . While historically philosophical issues concerning education were treated alongside other philosophical issues, in recent times the former set of issues have been largely neglected (...)
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  • Lucky Belief in Science Education.Richard Brock - 2018 - Science & Education 27 (3-4):247-258.
    The conceptualisation of knowledge as justified true belief has been shown to be, at the very least, an incomplete account. One challenge to the justified true belief model arises from the proposition of situations in which a person possesses a belief that is both justified and true which some philosophers intuit should not be classified as knowledge. Though situations of this type have been imagined by a number of writers, they have come to be labelled Gettier cases. Gettier cases arise (...)
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  • Knowledge, Belief, and Science Education.Tiago Alfredo S. Ferreira, Charbel N. El-Hani & Waldomiro José da Silva-Filho - 2016 - Science & Education 25 (7-8):775-794.
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  • Introduction: Education, Social Epistemology and Virtue Epistemology.Ben Kotzee - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (2):157-167.
  • Epistemology in Excess? A Response to Williams.Siegel Harvey - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4).
    Emma Williams’ ‘In Excess of Epistemology’ admirably endeavours to open the way to an account of critical thinking that goes beyond the one I have defended ad nauseum in recent decades by developing, via the work of Charles Taylor and Martin Heidegger, ‘a radically different conception of thinking and the human being who thinks’, one that ‘does more justice to receptive and responsible conditions of human thought.’ In this response I hope to show that much of Williams’ alternative approach is (...)
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  • Is True Belief Really a Fundamental Epistemic Value?Lance K. Aschliman - forthcoming - Episteme:1-17.
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  • Experts, Teachers and Their Epistemic Roles in Normative and Non-Normative Domains.Tobias Steinig - 2012 - Analyse & Kritik 34 (2):251-274.
    Goldman’s notions of expert and testimony in epistemological contexts are extended to normative issues. The result is a sketch of a conceptual framework: several types of experts and roles they can serve in informing not specially qualified recipients are distinguished; differences between experts in epistemological and moral contexts are highlighted. This framework then is the point of reference for claims about experts, expertise and moral testimony in Birnbacher’s and Jones & Schroeter’s contributions to this volume. First, Birnbacher’s worries about the (...)
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  • Social Epistemology and the Aim of Education.Luke A. Buckland - 2016 - South African Journal of Philosophy 35 (1):103-110.
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  • The Role of Authority in Science and Religion with Implications for Science Teaching and Learning.Mike U. Smith - 2013 - Science & Education 22 (3):605-634.
  • Credibility and Credulity: Monitoring Teachers for Trustworthiness.William Hare - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (2):207–219.
  • Epistemology in Excess? A Response to Williams.Siegel Harvey - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):193-213.
    Emma Williams’ ‘In Excess of Epistemology’ admirably endeavours to open the way to an account of critical thinking that goes beyond the one I have defended ad nauseum in recent decades by developing, via the work of Charles Taylor and Martin Heidegger, ‘a radically different conception of thinking and the human being who thinks’, one that ‘does more justice to receptive and responsible conditions of human thought.’ In this response I hope to show that much of Williams’ alternative approach is (...)
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