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  1. John Dewey, Myrtle McGraw and Logic: An Unusual Collaboration in the 1930s.Thomas C. Dalton & Victor W. Bergenn - 1996 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (1):69-107.
  • Child, Philosophy and Education:Discussing the Intellectual Sources of Philosophy for Children.H. Juuso - unknown
    The study analyzes the theoretical basis of the Philosophy for Children program elaborated by Matthew Lipman. The aim is, firstly, to identify the main philosophical and pedagogical principles of P4C based on American pragmatism, and to locate their pedagogization and possible problems in Lipman's thinking. Here the discussion is especially targeted to the thinking of John Dewey and George H. Mead as well as Lev Vygotsky, whom Lipman himself names as the most pivotal sources for his own thinking. On the (...)
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  • Meaning and Value in Medical School Curricula.Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Miles Little, Jill Gordon & Pippa Markham - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1027-1035.
    Rationale, aims and objectives: Bioethics and professionalism are standard subjects in medical training programmes, and these curricula reflect particular representations of meaning and practice. It is important that these curricula cohere with the actual concerns of practicing clinicians so that students are prepared for real-world practice. We aimed to identify ethical and professional concerns that do not appear to be adequately addressed in standard curricula by comparing ethics curricula with themes that emerged from a qualitative study of medical practitioners. Method: (...)
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  • An Innocent Abroad? John Dewey and International Politics.Robert B. Westbrook - 1993 - Ethics and International Affairs 7:203–221.
    Using Dewey's critics' own arguments that purport to show Dewey intentionally, or naively, disregarded the role of power in the relations of communities, Westbrook brings examples to reinforce the contrary view.
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  • The Unifying Function of Affect: Founding a Theory of Psychocultural Development in the Epistemology of John Dewey and Carl Jung.Peter T. Dunlap - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (1):53-68.
    In this paper I explore the shared interest of John Dewey and Carl Jung in the developmental continuity between biological, psychological, and cultural phenomena. Like other first generation psychological theorists, Dewey and Jung thought that psychology could be used to deepen our understanding of this continuity and thus gain a degree of control over human development. While their pursuit of this goal received little institutional support, there is a growing body of theory and practice derived from the new field of (...)
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  • Paying Attention to Bodies in Education: Theoretical Resources and Practical Suggestions.Marjorie O'loughlin - 1998 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 30 (3):275–297.
  • Paying Attention to Bodies in Education: Theoretical Resources and Practical Suggestions.Marjorie O'loughlin - 1998 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 30 (3):275-297.