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Associative political obligations

Ethics 106 (2):247-273 (1996)

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  1. Impartiality and Associative Duties.David O. Brink - 2001 - Utilitas 13 (2):152.
    Consequentialism is often criticized for failing to accommodate impersonal constraints and personal options. A common consequentialist response is to acknowledge the anticonsequentialist intuitions but to argue either that the consequentialist can, after all, accommodate the allegedly recalcitrant intuitions or that, where accommodation is impossible, the recalcitrant intuition can be dismissed for want of an adequate philosophical rationale. Whereas these consequentialist responses have some plausibility, associational duties represent a somewhat different challenge to consequentialism, inasmuch as they embody neither impersonal constraints nor (...)
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  • State of the Art: The Duty to Obey the Law.William A. Edmundson - 2004 - Legal Theory 10 (4):215–259.
  • Global Climate Change: Interests of Foreigners.Amarbayasgalan Dorjderem - 2011 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 11 (1):31-37.
    My interest here is to consider ‘whether non-violent civil disobedience should be used as a means to promote action on global climate change’ (Lemons & Brown 2011, p. 3), as a result of one’s obligation towards the members of one’s own political community. In the second part, the interests of nongoverned persons are considered within the scope of political obligation, including the authors’ appeal to Gandhi’s movement and autonomy to protect the interests of foreigners in conjunction with civil disobedience.
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  • Saving Life, Limb, and Eyesight: Assessing the Medical Rules of Eligibility During Armed Conflict.Michael L. Gross - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (10):40-52.
    Medical rules of eligibility permit severely injured Iraqi and Afghan nationals to receive care in Coalition medical facilities only if bed space is available and their injuries result directly from Coalition fire. The first rule favors Coalition soldiers over host-nation nationals and contradicts the principle of impartial, needs-based medical care. To justify preferential care for compatriots, wartime medicine invokes associative obligations of care that favor friends, family, and comrades-in-arms. Associative obligations have little place in peacetime medical care but significantly affect (...)
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  • Critical Reception of Raz's Theory of Authority.Kenneth M. Ehrenberg - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (11):777-785.
    This is a canvass to the critical reaction to Joseph Raz’s service conception of authority, as well as actual or possible replies by Raz. Familiarity is assumed with the theory itself, covered in a previ- ous article. The article focuses primarily on direct criticisms of Raz’s theory, rather than replies developed in the context of a theorist’s wider project.
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  • The Identity-Enactment Account of Associative Duties.Saba Bazargan-Forward - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-20.
    Associative duties are agent-centered duties to give defeasible moral priority to our special ties. Our strongest associative duties are to close friends and family. According to reductionists, our associative duties are just special duties—i.e., duties arising from what I have done to others, or what others have done to me. These include duties to abide by promises and contracts, compensate our benefactors in ways expressing gratitude, and aid those whom we have made especially vulnerable to our conduct. I argue, though, (...)
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  • Do Judges Have an Obligation to Enforce the Law?: Moral Responsibility and Judicial-Reasoning.Anthony R. Reeves - 2010 - Law and Philosophy 29 (2):159-187.
    Judicial obligation to enforce the law is typically regarded as both unproblematic and important: unproblematic because there is little reason to doubt that judges have a general, if prima facie, obligation to enforce law, and important because the obligation gives judges significant reason to limit their concern in adjudication to applying the law. I challenge both of these assumptions and argue that norms of political legitimacy, which may be extra-legal, are irretrievably at the basis of responsible judicial reasoning.
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  • Penal Coercion in Contexts of Social Injustice.Roberto Gargarella - 2011 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (1):21-38.
    This article addresses the theoretical difficulty of justifying the use of penal coercion in circumstances of marked, unjustified social inequality. The intuitive belief behind the text is that in such a context—that of an indecent State—justifying penal coercion becomes very problematic, particularly when directed against the most disfavored members of society.
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  • Contractarianism, Other-Regarding Attitudes, and the Moral Standing of Nonhuman Animals.Andrew I. Cohen - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):188–201.
  • Communal Ties and Political Obligations.Dorota Mokrosinska - 2013 - Ratio Juris 26 (2):187-214.
    The associative argument for political obligation has taken an important place in the debate on political obligation. Proponents of this view argue that an obligation to obey the government arises out of ties of affiliation among individuals who share the same citizenship. According to them, relationships between compatriots constitute basic reasons for action in the same way in which relationships between family members or friends do. As critics point out, this account of the normative force of relationships has counterintuitive implications: (...)
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  • Associative Political Obligations.Bas van der Vossen - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (7):477-487.
    This article aims to provide some insight into the nature and content of the theory of associative political obligation. It does this by first locating the view in the wider debate on political obligation, analyzing the view in terms of four central elements that are shared by many of its versions, and then discussing important criticisms that have been made of each of these, as well as some rejoinders by defenders of the theory.
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  • In Search of Sociality.Margaret Gilbert - 1998 - Philosophical Explorations 1 (3):233 – 241.
    This paper reviews some of the growing body of work in the analytic philosophy of social phenomena, with special reference to the question whether adequate accounts of particular social phenomena can be given in terms that are individualistic in a sense that is specified. The discussion focusses on accounts of what have come to be known as shared intention and action. There is also some consideration of accounts of social convention and collective belief. Particular attention is paid to the need (...)
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  • Liberalism, Samaritanism, and Political Legitimacy.Christopher H. Wellman - 1996 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 25 (3):211-237.
  • Authority, Nationality, and Minorities.Alex Schwartz - 2015 - Ratio Juris 28 (3):354-371.
    Prominent normative theories for accommodating minority national groups appeal to the value of national cultures and/or the psychology of group recognition. This article aims to show that an argument from political authority provides a better justification. Building on Joseph Raz's theory of authority, the article argues that members of minority national groups are disadvantaged in relation to their majority counterparts under standard democratic institutions; such institutions do not provide minority national groups with comparable access to the conditions for legitimate political (...)
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