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  1. Central Authority and Order.Emily Erikson & Joseph M. Parent - 2007 - Sociological Theory 25 (3):245-267.
    Strong central authorities are able to effectively manage costly defection, but are unable to adequately address lesser conflicts because of limits to their ability to monitor and enforce. We argue, counterintuitively, that these limitations build cooperation and trust among subordinates: the limitations contribute to the production of order. First, limits to authority leave space for locally informed decentralized enforcement. Second, central authorities act as powerful but incompetent third parties whose threatened interventions increase incentives to cooperate and, therefore, to trust. We (...)
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  • On the Elementary Forms of the Socioerotic Life.Sasha Weitman - 1998 - Theory, Culture and Society 15 (3-4):71-110.
    In this article I undertake an analysis of erotic sexual intercourse - commonly, and more accurately, designated as love-making - in the spirit of Durkheim's social analysis of religion. Thus, based on a phenomenological semiotic analysis of the peculiar things we do and feel in the course of making love, I propose, first, to uncover the implicit `logic' that generates and governs these distinctly sociable doings and sociable feelings. Second, I proceed to suggest that the sameself logic, albeit in an (...)
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  • Complexity Theory, Systems Theory, and Multiple Intersecting Social Inequalities.Sylvia Walby - 2007 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (4):449-470.
    This article contributes to the revision of the concept of system in social theory using complexity theory. The old concept of social system is widely discredited; a new concept of social system can more adequately constitute an explanatory framework. Complexity theory offers the toolkit needed for this paradigm shift in social theory. The route taken is not via Luhmann, but rather the insights of complexity theorists in the sciences are applied to the tradition of social theory inspired by Marx, Weber, (...)
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  • Vortexes of Involvement: Social Systems as Turbulent Flow.Erika Summers-Effler - 2007 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (4):433-448.
    How does social organization persist? How does social organization transform? This article proposes that social scientists can begin to answer these questions by considering social organization as the intermittent construction and decay of patterned action, and social actors as centers of organization with the capacity to exert force within some social scene. From this perspective, contexts that shape the dynamics of both actors and scenes could be imagined as turbulent flows that push and pull action into temporary patterns. By viewing (...)
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  • The Conflict of Ethos and Ethics: A Sociological Theory of Business People’s Ethical Values. [REVIEW]Lydia Segal & Mark Lehrer - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):513-528.
    This article develops a sociological theory of ambivalence to explain several puzzling and contradictory ethical attitudes of business people: (1) a simultaneous disposition to comparatively more self-interested and more charitable behavior than many other occupational groups and (2) a moderate level of receptiveness to inculcation of moral principles through social channels such as higher education. We test the theory by comparing the way that business students rate the ethical acceptability of various ethically challenging scenarios with the way that criminal justice (...)
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  • Kurt H. Wolff: A Brief Biography. [REVIEW]George Psathas - 2003 - Human Studies 26 (3):285-291.
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  • The Eventfulness of Social Reproduction.Adam Moore - 2011 - Sociological Theory 29 (4):294 - 314.
    The work of William Sewell and Marshall Sahlins has led to a growing interest in recent years in events as a category of analysis and their role in the transformation of social structures. I argue that tying events solely to instances of significant structural transformation entails problematic theoretical assumptions about stability and change and produces a circumscribed field of events, undercutting the goal of developing an "eventful" account of social life. Social continuity is a state that is achieved just as (...)
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  • How to Model an Institution.John W. Mohr & Harrison C. White - 2008 - Theory and Society 37 (5):485-512.
  • Protestantism and Authoritarianism: Weber's Secondary Problem.Milan Zafirovski - 2010 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 40 (2):162-189.
  • The Origin of Speech and its Implication for the Optimal Size of Human Groups.A. R. Maryanski - 1997 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 11 (2):233-249.
    Abstract In Grooming, Gossip and the Evolution of Language, Robin Dunbar argues that speech developed from primate vocalizations as a replacement for grooming. Dunbar convincingly shows that language is just a highly developed form of primate communication. But Dunbar's thesis about the relationship between speech and optimal group size is problematic: his focus on strong ties leads him to overlook the integrative force of weak?tie networks.
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  • Modeling Role Enactment: Linking Role Theory and Social Cognition.Karen Danna Lynch - 2007 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (4):379–399.
    In our dynamic social world, a premium is placed on the individual's ability to innovate and to change . Yet traditional role theory has difficulty accounting for innovation, leaving unanswered the question of how individual level negotiations affect social-structural processes . This study addresses this tension by linking role theory with social cognition. By positioning behavior and cognition as two interrelated continuums, I stretch the meaning of role enactment to include 4 role typologies. I utilize these typologies as a heuristic (...)
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  • Negotiating Privacy Through Phatic Communication. A Case Study of the Blogging Self.Stine Lomborg - 2012 - Philosophy and Technology 25 (3):415-434.
    The article provides an instructive in-depth analysis of communicative practices in the personal blog. Its aim is to document the discursive dynamics and interactional ethics of blogging, with a specific focus on negotiations of the blogging self in-between public and private. Based on key findings from an empirical case study of personal blogs, the article addresses the negotiation of the blogging self from three interdependent perspectives: the network structures, patterns of interaction, and thematic orientations of the blog. Instead of approaching (...)
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  • Recognition Today: The Theoretical, Ethical and Political Stakes of the Concept.Christian Lazzeri & Alain Caillé - 2006 - Critical Horizons 7 (1):63.
    Within moral and political philosophy and the social sciences, recent conceptual developments in the concept of recognition cannot be dissociated from an opposition to those theories inspired by what is commonly called rational action theory or the economic model of action. The paradigm of recognition represents the heart of those theories that are both alternative and complementary to the theory of individual action. Nonetheless, this conceptual development calls out for an alliance between political philosophy and the social sciences. We argue (...)
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  • The Relevance of Bentley for Group Theory: Founding Father or Mistaken Identity?Grant Jordan - 1999 - History of the Human Sciences 12 (1):27-54.
    A. F. Bentley’s The Process of Government (1908) is widely accepted as an important source of contemporary interest group study. This paper argues to the contrary that Bentley’s arguments in this area are obscure and have contributed little to the programme of modern interest group research. His importance is as a contributor to the debate on the nature of social science and social science method and not as the starting-point for interest group analysis. The judgement about his role as a (...)
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  • Fugitive Reconciliation: The Agonistics of Respect, Resentment and Responsibility in Post-Conflict Society.Alexander Keller Hirsch - 2011 - Contemporary Political Theory 10 (2):166-189.
    Traditionally, transitional justice has referred to that field of theoretical scholarship that proffers recuperative strategies for political societies divided by a history of violence. Through the establishment of truth commissions, public confessionals and reparative measures, transitional justice regimes have sought to establish restorative conditions that might help reconcile historical antagonists both to each other and to the trauma of their shared past. Because of some of the theoretical lapses in this scholarship some have turned recently to the field of radical (...)
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  • Relevancias y planes de vida en el mundo sociocultural.Pablo Hermida-Lazcano - 2009 - Schutzian Research 1:227-243.
    After justifying its centrality in the Schützian project of founding interpretive sociology, I present the theory of relevance as the cornerstone of Schütz’s constitutive phenomenology of the natural attitude, conceived of as the investigation of the meaningful construction and the structures of the lifeworld. Through what I call the life-plans approach, I contend that the essence of every sociocultural world has to be found in a thick network of intersubjective and hierarchized relevance structures upon which personal life-projects are built. This (...)
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  • Virtue, Profit, and the Separation Thesis: An Aristotelian View. [REVIEW]Edwin M. Hartman - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (1):5 - 17.
    If social scientists take natural science as a model, they may err in their predictions and may offer facile ethical views. Maclntyre assails them for this, but he is unduly pessimistic about business, and in rejecting the separation thesis he raises some difficulties about naturalism.Aristotle's views of the good life and of the close relationship between internal and external goods provide a corrective to Maclntyre, and in fact suggest how virtues can support social capital and thus prevail within and among (...)
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  • A National Analysis of Endowed Chairs and Distinguished Professors in the Field of Education.Nicholas Daniel Hartlep, Daisy Ball, Kendra Theodosopoulos, Kevin Wells & Grant B. Morgan - 2016 - Educational Studies: A Jrnl of the American Educ. Studies Assoc 52 (2):119-138.
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  • Recurrent Structures and Teleology.Leon J. Goldstein - 1962 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 5 (1-4):1 – 11.
    Though many would prefer to have nothing to do with teleological explanations, it is evident that the writings of biologists and social scientists abound with them, and it is worth paying attention to the conditions under which they may be made responsibly. It emerges that responsible teleological statements would have to be made about instances of recurrent structures having specifiable characteristics, a situation which is patently the case for biology but still unsettled in, say, anthropology. In the final part of (...)
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  • An “Amorphous Mist”? The Problem of Measurement in the Study of Culture.Amin Ghaziani - 2009 - Theory and Society 38 (6):581-612.
  • Is War in Our Nature?Azar Gat - 2019 - Human Nature 30 (2):149-154.
    The Seville Statement on Violence rejected the view that violence and war were in any way rooted in human nature and proclaimed that they were merely a cultural artifact. This paper points out both the valid and invalid parts of the statement. It concludes that the potential for both war and peace is embedded in us. The human behavioral toolkit comprises a number of major tools, respectively geared for violent conflict, peaceful competition, or cooperation, depending on people’s assessment of what (...)
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  • Georg Simmel: An Introduction.Mike Featherstone - 1991 - Theory, Culture and Society 8 (3):1-16.
  • At the Intersections Between Internet Studies and Philosophy: “Who Am I Online?”.Charles Ess - 2012 - Philosophy and Technology 25 (3):275-284.
    This special issue fosters joint exploration of personal identity by both philosophers, on the one hand, and scholars and researchers in Internet Studies, on the other. The summary of articles gathered here leads to a larger collective account of personal identity that highlights embodiment and thereby the continuities between online and offline senses and experiences of selfhood. I connect this collective account with other contemporary works at the intersections between philosophy and IS, such as on trust and virtual worlds, thereby (...)
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  • Formalist and Relationalist Theory in Social Network Analysis.Emily Erikson - 2013 - Sociological Theory 31 (3):219-242.
    Social network research is widely considered atheoretical. In contrast, in this article I argue that network analysis often mixes two distinct theoretical frameworks, creating a logically inconsistent foundation. Relationalism rejects essentialism and a priori categories and insists upon the intersubjectivity of experience and meaning as well as the importance of the content of interactions and their historical setting. Formalism is based on a structuralist interpretation of the theoretical works of Georg Simmel. Simmel laid out a neo-Kantian program of identifying a (...)
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  • Pragmatism, Bourdieu, and Collective Emotions in Contentious Politics.Mustafa Emirbayer & Chad Alan Goldberg - 2005 - Theory and Society 34 (5-6):469-518.
  • Bourdieu and Organizational Analysis.Mustafa Emirbayer & Victoria Johnson - 2008 - Theory and Society 37 (1):1-44.
  • The Causal Power of Discourse.Dave Elder-Vass - 2011 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 41 (2):143-160.
    This paper outlines a realist approach to the social ontology of discourse. It seeks to synthesise some elements of the approach to discourse found in the early work of Michel Foucault with a critical realist understanding of the causal power of social structures. It will argue that discursive structures can be causally significant when they are normatively endorsed and enforced by specific groups of people; that it is not discourse as such but these groups—discursive circles—that are causally effective; and that (...)
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  • Y a-T-Il des Sentiments Moraux?Paul Dumouchel - 2004 - Dialogue 43 (3):471-490.
    A quick survey of the literature reveals that authors disagree as to which sentiments are moral and which are not, they disagee as to how to distinguish between moral and other sentiments, and finally that often the same author will claim a sentiment is moral at some times but not at others. These difficulties arise, I argue, from an underlying concept of emotion that I call atomism. Viewing emotions as means of coordination among agents, rather than as psychic atoms, suggests (...)
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  • Beyond Prejudice: Are Negative Evaluations the Problem and is Getting Us to Like One Another More the Solution?John Dixon, Mark Levine, Steve Reicher, Kevin Durrheim, Dominic Abrams, Mark Alicke, Michal Bilewicz, Rupert Brown, Eric P. Charles & John Drury - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (6):411.
    For most of the history of prejudice research, negativity has been treated as its emotional and cognitive signature, a conception that continues to dominate work on the topic. By this definition, prejudice occurs when we dislike or derogate members of other groups. Recent research, however, has highlighted the need for a more nuanced and (Eagly 2004) perspective on the role of intergroup emotions and beliefs in sustaining discrimination. On the one hand, several independent lines of research have shown that unequal (...)
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  • Am I My Brother’s Keeper? Grounding and Motivating an Ethos of Social Responsibility in a Free Society.David Thunder - 2009 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 12 (4):559-580.
  • Democratic Freedom as Resistance Against Self‐Hatred, Epistemic Injustice, and Oppression in Paulo Freire's Critical Theory.Gustavo H. Dalaqua - 2019 - Constellations 26 (4):525-537.
  • Fate, Experience and Tragedy in Simmel’s Dialogue with Modernity.Robert William Button - 2012 - Theory, Culture and Society 29 (7-8):53-77.
    This article explores the neglected idea of fate in Simmel’s thought. It examines the specific definition of fate present in Simmel’s writings and the relation of this definition to tragic drama. The argument operates under the assumption that tragic drama represents the ‘natural habitat’ for the exploration and expression of the fate problematic. In this context, it is argued that Simmel’s rediscovery of the relevance of fate emphasizes the modernity of tragedy. The article explores Simmel’s translation of fate from drama (...)
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  • Deliberative Business Ethics.Ryan Burg - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S4):665 - 683.
    Social norms are an important input for ethical decisions in any business context. However, the cross-cultural discovery of extant social norms presents a special challenge to international management because norms may be inscrutable to outsiders. This article considers the contribution of Integrative Social Contracts Theory (ISCT) to the analysis of social norms in business ethics. It questions the origins and dynamics of norms from a sociological perspective, and identifies a tension between prescriptive efforts to make norms obligatory and positivist accounts (...)
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  • The Insoluble Problem of the Social Contract.David Braybrooke - 1976 - Dialogue 15 (1):3-37.
    The traditional problem of the social contract defies solution. Agents with the motivations traditionally assumed would not in the circumstances traditionally assumed voluntarily arrive at a contract or voluntarily keep it up, as we can now understand, more clearly than our illustrious predecessors, by treating the problem in terms not available to them: the terms of Prisoner's Dilemma and of the theory of public goods.
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  • Inward and Outward with the Modern Self.David Braybrooke - 1994 - Dialogue 33 (1):101-.
    The modern self, with its inwardness, its freedom and its individuality, suffers, Taylor tells us, from disenchantment. Moreover, disenchantment has come in spite of the advance, to which Taylor wishes to give full credit, that modernity has made in giving great value to ordinary life at work and in the family. For religion, though still present as one layer of sentiment among many in the historical deposits that compose modern culture, has given ground to “disengaged instrumentalism” or to its antagonist, (...)
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  • Honor, Self and Social Reproduction.Vern Baxter & A. V. Margavio - 2011 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 41 (2):121-142.
    Honor is a difficult field of inquiry that deserves systematic attention from social scientists. Honor is an internalized concern for recognition and approval that links reputation with conduct and helps sustain existing patterns of social selection and evaluation. The paper argues that scholars are remiss that consider the field of honor obsolete or a residual category left over from the transition to modern forms of social organization. A modern conception of honor is identified in the relationship of a reflexive self (...)
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  • What the Action Is: A Cross-Cultural Approach.Donald W. Ball - 1972 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 2 (2):121–143.
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  • Husserlian Affinities in Simmel's Later Philosophy of History: The 1918 Essay.Gary Backhaus - 2003 - Human Studies 26 (2):223-258.
  • Prejudice Reduction, Collective Action, and Then What?Dominic Abrams, Milica Vasiljevic & Hazel M. Wardrop - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (6):425-426.
    Despite downsides, it must, on balance, be good to reduce prejudice. Despite upsides, collective action can also have destructive outcomes. Improving intergroup relations requires multiple levels of analysis involving a broader approach to prejudice reduction, awareness of potential conflict escalation, development of intergroup understanding, and promotion of a wider human rights perspective.
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  • Correspondents Theory 1800/2000: Philosophical Reflections Upon Epistolary Technics and Praxis in the Analogue and Digital. [REVIEW]Anthony John Charles Ross - unknown
    When we talk about things like the 'lost art of letter-writing' or the 'digital communications revolution,' what do we mean? What do we lose and what do we gain as we move towards digital ways of being in the world? Critically engaging with many of the canonical writers in the philosophy of technology , and following what has been termed the 'empirical turn' in that discipline, this thesis answers such questions by means of a philosophical, comparative study of epistolary technics (...)
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  • Empathic Actors Strengthen Organisational Immunity to Industrial Crisis: Industrial Actors’ Perception in Nepal.Raj Kumar Bhattarai - 2016 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 17 (1):109-128.
    This paper aims to understand the kind of activities that industrial actors develop in order to protect their enterprises during industrial crisis conditions. A series of political unrest, insurgency, economic turmoil, deadly earthquakes, and economic embargo at the Indo- Nepal boarder escalated the industrial crisis in Nepal. The quest for sustainability of enterprises during the enduring nature of the crisis stimulated for a more detail conversation and survey. A perceptual survey of industrial actors accompanying conversation therein indicates that trade union (...)
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