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  1. Philosophical Anarchism and the Paradox of Politics.Jeremy Arnold - 2016 - European Journal of Political Theory 15 (3):1474885114562976.
    In this paper, I compare two prominent positions within contemporary "Analytic" and "Continental" political philosophy: philosophical anarchism and the paradox of politics. I compare each through an analysis of their respective criticisms of state legitimacy and the internal difficulties each position has in accounting for the legitimacy of state violence. I argue that these internal difficulties force each position to ask questions and criticize assumptions commonly found in the other position. I hope to show through this comparison that work across (...)
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  • Reasons Beyond Reason? 'Political Obligation' Reconsidered.Glen Newey - 1996 - Philosophical Papers 25 (1):21--46.
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  • Political Anarchism and Raz’s Theory of Authority.Bruno Leipold - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (3):309-329.
    This article argues that using Joseph Raz’s service conception of authority to reject philosophical anarchism can be affected by political anarchism. Whereas philosophical anarchism only denies the authority of the state, political anarchism claims that anarchism is a better alternative to the state. Raz’s theory holds that an institution has authority if it enables people to better conform with reason. I argue that there are cases where anarchism is an existing alternative to the state and better fulfils this condition. Consequently, (...)
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  • Law Without Legitimacy or Justification? The Flawed Foundations of Philosophical Anarchism.Ryan Windeknecht - 2012 - Res Publica 18 (2):173-188.
    In this article, I examine A. John Simmons’s philosophical anarchism, and specifically, the problems that result from the combination of its three foundational principles: the strong correlativity of legitimacy rights and political obligations; the strict distinction between justified existence and legitimate authority; and the doctrine of personal consent, more precisely, its supporting assumptions about the natural freedom of individuals and the non-natural states into which individuals are born. As I argue, these assumptions, when combined with the strong correlativity and strict (...)
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