Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Race, Religion, and Informed Consent - Lessons From Social Science.Dayna Bowen Matthew - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (1):150-173.
    Patients belonging to ethnic, racial, and religious minorities have been all but excluded from the legal academy's on-going conversation about informed consent. This article repairs that egregious omission. It begins by observing the narrowing of ethical justifications that underlie our informed consent law, tracing the ethical literature from the ancients to modern formulations of autonomy-centered models. Next, this article reviews the vast body of empirical data available in social science literature, that demonstrates how distinct from the autonomy model the broad (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Time, Right and the Justice of War and Peace in Hugo Grotius’s Political Thought.Hansong Li - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (4):536-552.
    ABSTRACTThe juridical force of time forms a critical, but hitherto unexplored part of Hugo Grotius’s discourse on the justice of war and peace. Grotius defines war as a span of time in which disputed rights and armed conflicts between states are examined in reference to temporal coordinates. This method allows him to adjust otherwise static laws to meet the demands of times and spaces in an increasingly expanded world. In doing so, Grotius is also able to reconcile multiple layers of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Natural Law Theories.Jonathan Crowe - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (2):91-101.
    This article considers natural law perspectives on the nature of law. Natural law theories are united by what Mark Murphy calls the natural law thesis: law is necessarily a rational standard for conduct. The natural law position comes in strong and weak versions: the strong view holds that a rational defect in a norm renders it legally invalid, while the weak view holds that a rational defect in a legal norm renders it legally defective. The article explores the motivations for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Political Conservation, or How to Prevent Institutional Decay.Martin Beckstein - forthcoming - Constellations.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Politics of Purity.Robbie Duschinsky - 2013 - Thesis Eleven 119 (1):63-77.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Sperm Donors as Assisters of Repoduction in Single Women.E. Ignovska - 2014 - Global Bioethics 25 (4):226-238.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Justice in the Laws, a Restatement: Why Plato Endorses Public Reason.Samuel Director - 2018 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 4 (2):184-203.
    In the Laws, Plato argues that the legislator should attempt to persuade people to voluntarily obey the laws. This persuasion is accomplished through use of legislative preludes. Preludes (also called preambles) are short arguments written into the legal code, which precede laws and give reasons to follow them. In this paper, I argue that Plato’s use of persuasive preludes shows that he endorses the core features of a public reason theory of political justification. Many philosophers argue that Plato’s political philosophy (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Eros and Ironic Intoxication: Profound Longing, Madness and Discipleship in Plato's Symposium and in Modern Life.Kieran Bonner - 2013 - History of the Human Sciences 26 (5):0952695113479358.
    The Symposium addresses the relation between desire, beauty and the good life, while indicating the fascination that strong teaching arouses in followers. For Plato, unlike for moderns, power, desire and ethics are interrelated. This article takes Socrates as a case study for the Platonic understanding of this interrelation and it will put into play the grounds involved in their modern separation. It focuses on the three speakers in the dialogue who were followers of Socrates as a way of addressing the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Trials of Law and Literature.Ronnie Warrington & Costas Douzinas - 1995 - Law and Critique 6 (2):135-165.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Why Women Must Guard and Rule in Plato's Kallipolis.Catherine Mckeen - 2006 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):527–548.
    Plato's discussion of women in the Republic is problematic. For one, arguments in Book V which purport to establish that women should guard and rule alongside men do not deliver the advertised conclusion. In addition, Plato asserts that women are "weaker in all pursuits" than men. Given this assumption, having women guard and rule seems inimical to the health, security, and goodness of the kallipolis. I argue that we best understand the inclusion of women by seeing how women's inclusion contributes (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Inability, Culpability and Affected Ignorance: Reflections on Michele Moody-Adams.Mark Peacock - 2011 - History of the Human Sciences 24 (3):65-81.
    In this article, I examine Michele Moody-Adams’ critique of the ‘inability thesis’, according to which some cultures make the resources for criticizing injustice ‘unavailable’ to their members. I investigate Moody-Adams’ alternative ‘affected ignorance’ thesis. Using the example of slavery in ancient Greece, I consider two potential candidates for affected ignorance which involve, respectively, ‘unawareness’ and ‘mistaken moral weighing’; in neither, I hold, may one ascribe culpability to those involved.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Reforming Science Education: Part II. Utilizing Kieran Egan’s Educational Metatheory.Roland M. Schulz - 2009 - Science & Education 18 (3-4):251-273.
  • The European Family and Athenian Fatherland: Political Metaphors Ancient and Modern.Jakub Filonik - 2018 - The European Legacy 23 (1-2):25-46.
    This article explores the role and modes of operation of metaphorical framing in ancient Greek and modern European and American political discourse. It looks at how concepts such as citizenship, ownership, family, morality, finance, sport, war, domination, human life, and animals are used to reframe political issues in ways promoted by the speaker, and how they may continue to be reshaped in the ongoing political discourse. The analysis of examples of ancient Athenian public rhetoric and of modern European and American (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Nietzschean Odyssey: On the Trans-Valuation of Values.Aakash Singh Rathore - 2018 - Journal of Human Values 25 (1):15-24.
    This article places Friedrich Nietzsche’s call to trans-valuate values into a wider historical panorama, hearkening back to ethical orientations within both the Archaic and the Attic Greek world with respect to the unity of the virtues. It is argued that the unity of cognitive and bodily excellence, so central to the Greek world, and culminating in Aristotle’s ethics, functioned inchoately as the measure according to which Nietzsche evaluated values. Extrapolating from the phenomenon of rival perceptions regarding the paradigmatic sculpture of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Race, Religion, and Informed Consent — Lessons From Social Science.Dayna Bowen Matthew - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (1):150-173.
  • Classification.R. Boyne - 2006 - Theory, Culture and Society 23 (2-3):21-30.
    First thoughts about classification inevitably turn to the simultaneously mundane and extraordinary ambition to capture the universe of all that there is and has been. This dream of the universal has two basic modes . First, I will follow the spirit of theos and logos as represented by the Platonic embrace of totality enshrined in Socrates’ scrupulous rejection of rhetorical dishonesty. Second, I will address the later part of the march to subjectivity as expressed by the mechanics of atomism and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark