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John Stuart Mill

Routledge (1989)

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  1. Mill's Antirealism.Christopher Macleod - 2016 - Philosophical Quarterly 66 (263):261-279.
    One of Mill's primary targets, throughout his work, is intuitionism. In this paper, I distinguish two strands of intuitionism, against which Mill offers separate arguments. The first strand, a priorism, makes an epistemic claim about how we come to know norms. The second strand, ‘first principle pluralism’, makes a structural claim about how many fundamental norms there are. In this paper, I suggest that one natural reading of Mill's argument against first principle pluralism is incompatible with the naturalism that drives (...)
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  • Mill, Intuitions and Normativity.Christopher Macleod - 2013 - Utilitas 25 (1):46-65.
    It is the purpose of this article to offer an account of Mill's metaethics. Expanding upon clues given recently by Dale Miller, and previously by John Skorupski, I suggest that when it comes to the foundations of his philosophy, Mill might share more with the intuitionists than we are accustomed to think. Common wisdom holds that Mill had no time for the normativity of intuitions. I wish to dispute, or at least temper, this dogma, by claiming that Mill's attitude towards (...)
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  • The J. S. Mill Bibliography: Recent Additions: The J. S. Mill Bibliography.M. H. Laine - 1990 - Utilitas 2 (2):345-348.
  • Neat, Swine, Sheep, and Deer: Mill and Peirce on Natural Kinds.Francesco Bellucci - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (5):911-932.
    In the earliest phase of his logical investigations, Peirce adopts Mill's doctrine of real Kinds as discussed in the System of Logic and adapts it to the logical conceptions he was then developing. In Peirce's definition of natural class, a crucial role is played by the notion of information: a natural class is a class of which some non-analytical proposition is true. In Peirce's hands, Mill's distinction between connotative and non-connotative terms becomes a distinction between symbolic and informative and pseudo-symbolic (...)
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  • John Stuart Mill, Determinism, and the Problem of Induction.Elijah Millgram - 2009 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (2):183-199.
    Auguste Comte's doctrine of the three phases through which sciences pass (the theological, the metaphysical, and the positive) allows us to explain what John Stuart Mill was attempting in his magnum opus, the System of Logic: namely, to move the science of logic to its terminal and 'positive' stage. Both Mill's startling account of deduction and his unremarked solution to the Humean problem of induction eliminate the notions of necessity or force—in this case, the 'logical must'—characteristic of a science's metaphysical (...)
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  • Some Controversies About Method in Nineteenth-Century Psychology.Fred Wilson - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 30 (1):91-127.
  • Some Controversies About Method in Nineteenth-Century Psychology.Fred Wilson - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 30 (1):91-127.
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  • Nietzsche's Positivism.Nadeem J. Z. Hussain - 2004 - European Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):326–368.
    Nietzsche’s favourable comments about science and the senses have recently been taken as evidence of naturalism. Others focus on his falsification thesis: our beliefs are falsifying interpretations of reality. Clark argues that Nietzsche eventually rejects this thesis. This article utilizes the multiple ways of being science friendly in Nietzsche’s context by focussing on Mach’s neutral monism. Mach’s positivism is a natural development of neo-Kantian positions Nietzsche was reacting to. Section 15 of Beyond Good and Evil is crucial to Clark’s interpretation. (...)
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  • The Racial and Religious Hatred Act 2006: A Millian Response.Alexander Brown - 2008 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 11 (1):1-24.
  • Gray’s Elegy for Progress.Glyn Morgan - 2006 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 9 (2):227-241.
    (2006). Gray’s Elegy for Progress. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 9, The Political Theory of John Gray, pp. 227-241.
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  • Wynn on Mathematical Empiricism.David Galloway - 1992 - Mind and Language 7 (4):333-358.