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The Buffon-Linnaeus Controversy

Isis 67 (3):356-375 (1976)

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  1. The Organism as Reality or as Fiction: Buffon and Beyond.Boris Demarest & Charles T. Wolfe - 2017 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 39 (1).
  • Degeneracy at Multiple Levels of Complexity.Paul H. Mason - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (3):277-288.
    Degeneracy is a poorly understood process, essential to natural selection. In the 18th and 19th centuries, the concept of degeneracy was commandeered by the colonial imagination. A rigid understanding of species, race, and culture grew to dominate the normative thinking that persisted well into the burgeoning new industrial age. A 20th-century reconfiguration of the concept by George Gamow highlighted a form of intraorganismic variation that is still underexplored. Degeneracy exists in a population of variants where structurally different components perform a (...)
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  • Buffon, German Biology, and the Historical Interpretation of Biological Species.Phillip R. Sloan - 1979 - British Journal for the History of Science 12 (2):109-153.
    The entry of time and history into biological systems of classification is perhaps the single most significant development in the history of biological systematics in the modern era. Darwin's claiming that descent is ‘… the hidden bond of connexion which naturalists have been seeking under the term of the natural system’, rather than seeing the answer in the multitude of previous attempts to resolve the problem in terms of morphological affinities, analogies, and complex relations of resemblance, marked the turning point (...)
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  • The Order of the Prophets: Series in Early French Social Science and Socialism.John Tresch - 2010 - History of Science 48 (3-4):3-4.
  • Studies on Animals and the Rise of Comparative Anatomy at and Around the Parisian Royal Academy of Sciences in the Eighteenth Century.Stéphane Schmitt - 2016 - Science in Context 29 (1):11-54.
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  • Buffon: From Natural History to the History of Nature?Thierry Hoquet - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (4):413-419.
  • Lacepède’s Syncretic Contribution to the Debates on Natural History in France Around 1800.Stephane Schmitt - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (3):429-457.
  • Locke and Botany.Peter R. Anstey & Stephen A. Harris - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (2):151-171.
    This paper argues that the English philosopher John Locke, who has normally been thought to have had only an amateurish interest in botany, was far more involved in the botanical science of his day than has previously been known. Through the presentation of new evidence deriving from Locke’s own herbarium, his manuscript notes, journal and correspondence, it is established that Locke made a modest contribution to early modern botany. It is shown that Locke had close and ongoing relations with the (...)
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  • Kant on the History of Nature: The Ambiguous Heritage of the Critical Philosophy for Natural History.Phillip R. Sloan - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (4):627-648.
  • Kant on Epigenesis, Monogenesis and Human Nature: The Biological Premises of Anthropology.Alix A. Cohen - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (4):675-693.
    The aim of this paper is to show that for Kant, a combination of epigenesis and monogenesis is the condition of possibility of anthropology as he conceives of it and that moreover, this has crucial implications for the biological dimension of his account of human nature. More precisely, I begin by arguing that Kant’s conception of mankind as a natural species is based on two premises: firstly the biological unity of the human species (monogenesis of the human races); and secondly (...)
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  • Collection and Collation: Theory and Practice of Linnaean Botany.Staffan Müller-Wille - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38 (3):541-562.
  • Behavioural Ecology’s Ethological Roots.Jean-Sébastien Bolduc - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (3):674-683.
  • Specimens, Slips and Systems: Daniel Solander and the Classification of Nature at the World's First Public Museum, 1753–1768.Edwin D. Rose - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Science 51 (2):205-237.
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  • Images of the Natural Universe in Rétif De La Bretonne’s La Découverte Australe.Ilaria LoTufo - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 34 (1):1-50.
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  • How to Make Oneself Nature's Spokesman? A Latourian Account of Classification in Eighteenth- and Early Nineteenth-Century Natural History.Dirk Stemerding - 1993 - Biology and Philosophy 8 (2):193-223.
    Classification in eighteenth-century natural history was marked by a battle of systems. The Linnaean approach to classification was severely criticized by those naturalists who aspired to a truly natural system. But how to make oneself nature''s spokesman? In this article I seek to answer that question using the approach of the French anthropologist of science Bruno Latour in a discussion of the work of the French naturalists Buffon and Cuvier in the eighteenth and early nineteenth century. These naturalists followed very (...)
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