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  1. Engineering the Human Soul: Analyzing Psychological Expertise.Nikolas Rose - 1992 - Science in Context 5 (2):351-369.
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  • Self-Regard and Other-Regard: Reflexive Practices in American Psychology, 1890–1940.Jill G. Morawski - 1992 - Science in Context 5 (2):281-308.
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  • Historicizing Mind Science: Discourse, Practice, Subjectivity.Mitchell G. Ash - 1992 - Science in Context 5 (2):193-207.
  • 'To Know Our Fellow Men to Do Them Good': American Psychology's Enduring Moral Project.Graham Richards - 1995 - History of the Human Sciences 8 (3):1-24.
  • Psychologists Interpreting Conversion: Two American Forerunners of the Hermeneutics of Suspicion.David Hay - 1999 - History of the Human Sciences 12 (1):55-72.
    Because of the importance of Puritanism in its history, one of the forms taken by religious Angst at the end of the 19th century in New England was uneasiness about the psychological nature and validity of the conversion experience. Apart from William James and G. Stanley Hall, the leading psychologists who investigated this phenomenon were Edwin Starbuck and James Leuba. Each had a different personal stance with regard to the plausibility of religious belief. In practice their differences of opinion over (...)
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  • From Natural Disability to the Moral Man: Calvinism and the History of Psychology.C. F. Goodey - 2001 - History of the Human Sciences 14 (3):1-29.
    Some humanist theologians within the French Reformed Church in the 17th century developed the notion that a disability of the intellect could exist in nature independently of any moral defect, freeing its possessors from any obligations of natural law. Sharpened by disputes with the church leadership, this notion began to suggest a species-type classification that threatened to override the importance of the boundary between elect and reprobate in the doctrine of predestination. This classification seems to look forward to the natural (...)
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  • History and the History of the Human Sciences: What Voice?Smith Roger - 1997 - History of the Human Sciences 10 (3):22-39.
    This paper discusses the historical voice in the history of the human sci ences. I address the question, 'Who speaks?', as a question about disci plinary identities and conventions of writing - identities and conventions which have the appearance of conditions of knowledge, in an area of activity where academic history and the history of science or intellectual history meet. If, as this paper contends, the subject-matter of the history of the human sciences is inherently contestable because of fundamental differences (...)
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  • Histories of Suspicion in a Time of Conspiracy: A Reflection on Aubrey Lewis's History of Paranoia.David J. Harper - 1994 - History of the Human Sciences 7 (3):89-109.
  • Introduction.Kurt Danziger - 1991 - History of the Human Sciences 4 (3):327-333.
  • Psychology in the 18th Century: A View From Encyclopaedias.Fernando Vidal - 1993 - History of the Human Sciences 6 (1):89-119.
  • The History of Psychological Categories.Roger Smith - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 36 (1):55-94.
    Psychological terms, such as ‘mind’, ‘memory’, ‘emotion’ and indeed ‘psychology’ itself, have a history. This history, I argue, supports the view that basic psychological categories refer to historical and social entities, and not to ‘natural kinds’. The case is argued through a wide ranging review of the historiography of western psychology, first, in connection with the field’s extreme modern diversity; second, in relation to the possible antecedents of the field in the early modern period; and lastly, through a brief introduction (...)
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  • 'Psychological Man' and Human Subjectivity in Historical Perspective.Irmingard Staeuble - 1991 - History of the Human Sciences 4 (3):417-432.
  • Problems of Powerlessness: Psychological Explanations of Social Inequality and Civil Unrest in Post-War America.Karen Baistow - 2000 - History of the Human Sciences 13 (3):95-116.
    This article concerns the emergence of psychological constructs of personal power and control in the United States during the 1960s and 1970s and the ways in which they contributed to contemporary political explanations of social unrest. While social scientists and politicians at the time saw this unrest as a social problem that posed threats to social cohesion and stability, they located its cause not in the power structure of society but in the individual’s sense of his or her own powerlessness. (...)
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  • Spooks and Spoofs.Elizabeth R. Valentine - 2012 - History of the Human Sciences 25 (2):67-90.
  • The Progress of Introspection in America, 1896–1938.Kenton Kroker - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 34 (1):77-108.
  • The Progress of Introspection in America, 1896-1938.K. Kroker - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (1):77-108.
    Most histories of psychology weave a story around the rise of objective methods of investigation and the decline of subjective introspection. This paper sidesteps such disciplinary stories by describing self-scrutiny as a practice that moved through a variety of cultural, social and technological contexts in early twentieth-century America. Edmund Jacobson's technique of 'progressive relaxation' is offered as a case in point. Jacobson, a Chicago clinician, developed this cure for nervousness out of his earlier research under E. B. Titchener, an experimental (...)
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