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  1. The Role of the Imagination in Adam Smith’s Refutation of the Homo Economicus Thesis.José de la Cruz Garrido - 2015 - Ideas Y Valores 64 (159):169-194.
    La filosofía moral de Adam Smith se fundamenta en el papel de la imaginación para explicar el orden social en un nivel macro, y como mecanismo de identificación afectiva en un nivel micro. En ambos casos, el rol de la imaginación en nuestra psicología moral refuta la tesis de un homo economicus, o de que el ser humano está motivado a entrar en sociedad por su interés personal. Esto sirve de premisa para refutar la posición hobbesiana de un estado de (...)
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  • The Origin of Language: A Scientific Approach to the Study of Man.Rüdiger Schreyer - 1985 - Topoi 4 (2):181-186.
    The Enlightenment regarded language as one of the most significant achievements of man. Consequently inquiries into the origin and development of language play a central role in eighteenth-century moral philosophy. This new science of man consciously adopts the method of analysis and synthesis used in the natural sciences of the time. In moral philosophy, analysis corresponds to the search for the basic principles of human nature. Synthesis is identified with the attempt to interpret all artificial achievements of man (arts, sciences (...)
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  • God and the Market: Adam Smith’s Invisible Hand. [REVIEW]Paul Oslington - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (4):429 - 438.
    The invisible hand image is at the centre of contemporary debates about capacities of markets, on which discussion of many other topics in business ethics rests. However, its meaning in Adam Smith's writings remains obscure, particularly the religious associations that were obvious to early readers. He drew on Isaac Newton's theories of divine action and providence, mediated through the moderate Calvinism of the eighteenth century Scottish circles in which he moved. I argue within the context of Smith's general providential account (...)
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  • Carrying Matters Too Far? Mandeville and the Eighteenth-Century Scots on the Evolution of Morals.Eugene Heath - 2014 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 12 (1):95-119.
    Mandeville offers an evolutionary explanation of norms that pivots on the power of praise to affect individuals. Yet this sort of account is not mentioned by Hume or Ferguson, and only indirectly noted by Smith. Nonetheless, there are various similarities in the thought of Mandeville and these philosophers. After delineating some resemblances, the essay takes up the objection Hume poses to Mandeville: praise fails to motivate if individuals take no pride in moral conduct. To this challenge there is a Mandevillean (...)
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  • James Dundas on the Hobbesian State of Nature.Alexander Broadie - 2013 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (1):1-13.
    During the last few months of his life James Dundas, first Lord Arniston (c. 1620–79), wrote a monograph on moral philosophy. It appears never to have been mentioned in any work whether academic or otherwise. It includes a discussion promoting three doctrines against Hobbes. First, that something is simply good and something is simply bad, and that the first rule of morals is not self-love, but the glory of God. Secondly, the state of nature is not a state of war. (...)
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  • Aristotle, Adam Smith and the Virtue of Propriety.Alexander Broadie - 2010 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):79-89.
    Adam Smith's ethics have long been thought to be much closer to the Stoic school than to any other school of the ancient world. Recent scholarship however has focused on the fact that Smith also appears to be quite close to Aristotle. I shall attend to Smith's deployment of a version of the doctrine of the mean, shall show that it is quite close to Aristotle's, shall demonstrate that in its detailed application it is seriously at odds with Stoic teaching (...)
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  • Sympathy, Beauty, and Sentiment: Adam Smith's Aesthetic Morality.Robert Fudge - 2009 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 7 (2):133-146.
    One of the more striking aspects of Adam Smith's moral theory is the degree to which it depends on and appeals to aesthetic norms. By considering what Smith says about judgments of propriety – the foundational type of judgment in his system – and by tying what he says in The Theory of Moral Sentiments to certain of his other writings, I argue that Smith ultimately defends an aesthetic morality. Among the challenges that any aesthetic morality faces is that it (...)
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  • Beyond Self-Interest and Altruism: A Reconstruction of Adam Smith's Theory of Human Conduct: Elias L. Khalil.Elias L. Khalil - 1990 - Economics and Philosophy 6 (2):255-273.
    I attempt a reconstruction of Adam Smith's view of human nature as explicated in The Theory of Moral Sentiments. Smith's view of human conduct is neither functionalist nor reductionist, but interactionist. The moral autonomy of the individual, conscience, is neither made a function of public approval nor reduced to self-contained impulses of altruism and egoism. Smith does not see human conduct as a blend of independently defined impulses. Rather, conduct is unified, by the underpinning sentiment of sympathy.
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  • The Self‐Deception of Economics.Robert Heilbroner - 1998 - Critical Review 12 (1-2):139-150.
    Formalization has led contemporary economics to turn its back on the study of capitalism as the social order to which it owes its origins and its intrinsic analytical focus. As a consequence, contemporary economics turns a blind eye to the empirical analysis of capital accumulation, the real‐world properties of markets, and the bifurcation of political power that endow capitalism with its unique historical properties. Instead, economics takes scientific, not social, analysis as its model, a view that gives an ideological cast (...)
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  • God and the Market: Adam Smith’s Invisible Hand.Paul Oslington - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (4):429-438.
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  • Rythmus and the Critique of Political Economy.Thomas H. Ford - 2010 - Empedocles: European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication 1 (2):215-224.
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  • The Economics of Science.Arthur M. Diamond - 1996 - Knowledge and Policy 9 (2-3):6-49.