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  1. How to Handle Co-Authorship When Not Everyone’s Research Contributions Make It Into the Paper.William Bülow, Zubin Master & Gert Helgesson - 2021 - Science and Engineering Ethics 27 (2):1-11.
    While much of the scholarly work on ethics relating to academic authorship examines the fair distribution of authorship credit, none has yet examined situations where a researcher contributes significantly to the project, but whose contributions do not make it into the final manuscript. Such a scenario is commonplace in collaborative research settings in many disciplines and may occur for a number of reasons, such as excluding research in order to provide the paper with a clearer focus, tell a particular story, (...)
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  • Authorship Not Taught and Not Caught in Undergraduate Research Experiences at a Research University.Lauren E. Abbott, Amy Andes, Aneri C. Pattani & Patricia Ann Mabrouk - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (5):2555-2599.
    This grounded study investigated the negotiation of authorship by faculty members, graduate student mentors, and their undergraduate protégés in undergraduate research experiences at a private research university in the northeastern United States. Semi-structured interviews using complementary scripts were conducted separately with 42 participants over a 3 year period to probe their knowledge and understanding of responsible authorship and publication practices and learn how faculty and students entered into authorship decision-making intended to lead to the publication of peer-reviewed technical papers. Herein (...)
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  • Authorship Policies at U.S. Doctoral Universities: A Review and Recommendations for Future Policies.Lisa M. Rasmussen, Courtney E. Williams, Mary M. Hausfeld, George C. Banks & Bailey C. Davis - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (6):3393-3413.
    Intellectual contribution in the form of authorship is a fundamental component of the academic career. While research has addressed questionable and harmful authorship practices, there has largely been no discussion of how U.S. academic institutions interpret and potentially mitigate such practices through the use of institution-level authorship policies. To gain a better understanding of the role of U.S. academic institutions in authorship practices, we conducted a systematic review of publicly available authorship policies for U.S. doctoral institutions, focusing on components such (...)
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  • Taiwanese Researchers’ Perceptions of Questionable Authorship Practices: An Exploratory Study.Sophia Jui-An Pan & Chien Chou - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (3):1499-1530.
    In 2014, SAGE Publications retracted 60 articles authored by Taiwanese researchers due to suspected peer-review fraud. This scandal led to the resignation of the Minister of Education at the time since he coauthored several retracted works. Issues regarding the lack of transparent decision-making processes regarding authorship were further disclosed. Motivated by the scandal, we believe that this is one of the first empirical studies of questionable authorship practices in East Asian academia; we investigate Taiwanese researchers’ perceptions of QAPs. To meet (...)
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  • Researchers’ Perceptions of Ethical Authorship Distribution in Collaborative Research Teams.Elise Smith, Bryn Williams-Jones, Zubin Master, Vincent Larivière, Cassidy R. Sugimoto, Adèle Paul-Hus, Min Shi, Elena Diller, Katie Caudle & David B. Resnik - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (4):1995-2022.
    Authorship is commonly used as the basis for the measurement of research productivity. It influences career progression and rewards, making it a valued commodity in a competitive scientific environment. To better understand authorship practices amongst collaborative teams, this study surveyed authors on collaborative journal articles published between 2011 and 2015. Of the 8364 respondents, 1408 responded to the final open-ended question, which solicited additional comments or remarks regarding the fair distribution of authorship in research teams. This paper presents the analysis (...)
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