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  1. William Whiston, Isaac Newton and the Crisis of Publicity.Stephen David Snobelen - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (3):573-603.
    William Whiston was one of the first British converts to Newtonian physics and his 1696 New theory of the earth is the first full-length popularization of the natural philosophy of the Principia. Impressed with his young protégé, Newton paved the way for Whiston to succeed him as Lucasian Professor of Mathematics in 1702. Already a leading Newtonian natural philosopher, Whiston also came to espouse Newton’s heretical antitrinitarianism in the middle of the first decade of the eighteenth century. In all, Whiston (...)
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  • Newton and Newtonianism: An Introduction.Scott Mandelbrote - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (3):415-425.
  • Philosophy in Poland: Varieties of Anti-Irrationalism. A Commitment to Reason Without the Worship of Reason.Konrad Werner - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-32.
    I shall elaborate more on the idea of anti-irrationalism proposed by the Polish analytic philosopher Kazimierz Ajdukiewicz, a prominent member of the Lvov-Warsaw School of philosophy and logic. In my reading, anti-irrationalism stands in opposition not only to overt irrationalism, which is made clear by the term itself, but also to all forms of rationalism that tip toward something like worship of reason. Having characterized anti-irrationalism as it originally appeared in Ajdukiewicz’s works, I shall propose a certain reformulation of it, (...)
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  • Newtonianism and Religion in the Netherlands.Ernestine G. E. van der Wall - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (3):493-514.
    In the early eighteenth century Newtonianism became popular in the Netherlands both in academic and non-academic circles. The ‘Book of Nature’ was interpreted with the help of Newton’s natural philosophy and his ideas about a providential deity, thereby greatly enhancing the attractiveness of physico-theology in the eighteenth-century United Provinces. Like other Europeans the Dutch welcomed physico-theology as a strategic means in their battle against irreligion and atheism. Bernard Nieuwentijt, Johan Lulofs, Petrus Camper, and Johannes Florentius Martinet were prominent experts in (...)
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  • Isaac Newton And The Publication Of His Mathematical Manuscripts.Niccolò Guicciardini - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (3):455-470.
    Newton composed several mathematical tracts which remained in manuscript form for decades. He chose to print some of his mathematical tracts in their entirety only after 1704. In this paper I will give information on the dissemination of Newton’s mathematical manuscripts before the eighteenth-century printing stage. I will not consider another important vehicle of dissemination of Newton’s mathematical discoveries, namely his correspondence with other mathematicians or with intermediaries such as Collins and Oldenburg.In a first stage, Newton’s mathematical manuscripts were rendered (...)
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  • Fitting Geomagnetic Fields Before the Invention of Least Squares: II. William Whiston's Isoclinic Maps of Southern England (1719 and 1721). [REVIEW]Richard J. Howarth - 2003 - Annals of Science 60 (1):63-84.
    (2003). Fitting Geomagnetic Fields before the Invention of Least Squares: II. William Whiston's Isoclinic Maps of Southern England (1719 and 1721) Annals of Science: Vol. 60, No. 1, pp. 63-84.
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  • Openness Versus Secrecy? Historical and Historiographical Remarks.Koen Vermeir - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Science 45 (2):165-188.
    Traditional historiography of science has constructed secrecy in opposition to openness. In the first part of the paper, I will challenge this opposition. Openness and secrecy are often interlocked, impossible to take apart, and they might even reinforce each other. They should be understood as positive categories that do not necessarily stand in opposition to each other. In the second part of this paper, I call for a historicization of the concepts of ‘openness’ and ‘secrecy’. Focusing on the early modern (...)
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  • Religious Reform and the Pulmonary Transit of the Blood.Stephen Mason - 2003 - History of Science 41 (4):459-471.
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  • Steve Fuller and Intelligent Design.J. Shearmur - 2010 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 40 (3):433-445.
    This essay offers a critical introduction to the intellectual issues involved in the Kitzmiller case relating to intelligent design, and to Steve Fuller’s involvement in it. It offers a brief appraisal of the intelligent design movement stemming from the work of Phillip E. Johnson, and of Steve Fuller’s case for intelligent design in a rather different sense.
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