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  1. ‘A Compound Wholly Mortal’1: Locke and Newton on the Metaphysics of Immortality.Liam P. Dempsey - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):241-264.
    In this paper I consider a cluster of positions which depart from the immortalist and dualist anthropologies of Rene Descartes and Henry More. In particular, I argue that John Locke and Isaac Newton are attracted to a monistic mind-body metaphysics, which while resisting neat characterization, occupies a conceptual space distinct from the dualism of the immortalists, on the one hand, and thoroughgoing materialism of Thomas Hobbes, on the other. They propound a sort of property monism: mind and body are distinct, (...)
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  • Unitarian Materialism. Christoph Stegmann, Joseph Priestley, and Their Concepts of Matter and Soul.Sascha Salatowsky - 2020 - Intellectual History Review 30 (1):7-29.
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  • From Matters of Faith to Matters of Fact: The Problem of Priestcraft in Early Modern England.James A. T. Lancaster - 2018 - Intellectual History Review 28 (1):145-165.
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  • John Locke, the Early Lockeans, and Priestcraft.Mark Goldie - 2018 - Intellectual History Review 28 (1):125-144.
  • Written in the Flesh: Isaac Newton on the Mind–Body Relation.Liam Dempsey - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (3):420-441.
    Isaac Newton’s views on the mind–body relation are of interest not only because of their somewhat unique departure from popular early modern conceptions of mind and its relation to body, but also because of their connections with other aspects of Newton’s thought. In this paper I argue that (1) Newton accepted an interesting sort of mind–body monism, one which defies neat categorization, but which clearly departs from Cartesian substance dualism, and (2) Newton took the power by which we move our (...)
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